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Please which of the w203 kompressor has low fuel consumption and low cost of maintenance. Between the.year 2003/2005 C180 c200 c220 and the c230 which of this cars seems better as im about getting my first car. By February I'll be 24yrs Old. Thanks er
 

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2003 C320 coupe, 2000 ML320
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Please which of the w203 kompressor has low fuel consumption and low cost of maintenance. Between the.year 2003/2005 C180 c200 c220 and the c230 which of this cars seems better as im about getting my first car. By February I'll be 24yrs Old. Thanks er
None of the above.. Being it's your first car... Find an old man that's been around cars a bit.. Take him with you to look them over..
 

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2000 S430, 2003 S430, 2000 S500, 2003 S600 TT, and 2005 E320 CDI
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Your first car? I'd recommend something easier to work on, such a 1990's-era Honda Civic or Accord, or Toyota Corolla. Not saying that a Mercedes-Benz is a bad car...not at all! We have five of them. But Honda and Toyota 4-cylinder cars are among the easier cars to work on and maintain, they're very fuel-efficient, and of course they're very reliable.

If you are looking for easiest maintenance on a W203, I would actually suggest a C240 with the V-6 and the 6-speed standard (manual) transmission. That M112 V6 engine is nearly bulletproof, and of course manual transmissions are known for their reliability. All of them should get close to the same fuel mileage, since Daimler built the W203 chassis very sturdily and thus not exactly featherweight.

Whatever car you decide on, bobby735's advice is good.
 

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I have to disagree that a Toyota or Honda is easier to work on. Those cars use transverse-mounted engines that pack the entire drivetrain into a small space. Many of those engines have timing belts that have to be replaced and the job is very difficult because of the tight spaces under the hood. I much prefer to work on a "correctly mounted" RWD style engine and transmission. Of course older version of those other cars will have simpler electronic systems, but issues with aging plastics are going to be a challenge with any older car.
 

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We actually have three Honda Civics in the 1990's range. They are indeed quite easy to work on, with everything pretty darn accessible (Accords of that age are even easier). Even the timing belt isn't too bad on those, and plastics aren't a big issue on at least Honda engines of that era. I was thinking of exactly the issue with electronics, which is dead-simple on those cars.

If one is going to own and drive a used Mercedes-Benz, then of course, I think that's great! M-B made these cars well. However, there are plenty of electronics in cars of this area and later (we currently also have four W220's and a W211, and I work on some friends' W203's...yes, I do like cars!). Therefore, if one is going to own one a W203/W211/W220 or anything like it, it's very important to have STAR Diagnostic System (SDS). If one has that, along with a mechanical interest, then I'd say sure, a W203 can be a good first car. But having SDS is a big part of that, and I would include that in the purchase price of any "modern-era" Mercedes-Benz automobile.

With that said, W203's are fine "little" cars. Rossafuss is in his early-to-mid 20's and has his 2005 E320 CDI with over 450,000 miles on it. I know that's a W211, but the W203's are basically just smaller W211's.

I would definitely suggest the V6.
 

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I love my w203, but it's not a car for an amateur.. I'm with Cowboy, ..Honda Civic, Toyota Corolla.. would probably be a better choice for a first time car owner.. Although, I do agree with you Rodney about the transverse engine thing.. Not any of my sideways engines ever got any of their back side plugs changed...
 

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My 2010 Honda Accord LX four banger is a dream car to work on. Plenty of space everywhere. Very reliable, has timing chain and just require mostly maintenance work.

I would not buy a Japanese cars from the 1990's. The newer (later 2000's) models are safer. When my kid started driving, I got him a used MB. They're safer cars and it gave me more peace of mind.

Good low mileage W210s can be had for a couple of thousands. If you're mechanically inclined, another 2K will make the car very reliable.

EDIT:

Just noticed you're from Nigeria? So........disregard my comments on the W210.

I have a 2005 C230K and I get about 10 kilometer per liter. It's a fun car to drive, but I prefer to drive my W210s. One of the reasons it currently has only 63,000 kilometers.

If you decide to get one, be aware that maintenance cost can be high around 160,000 km. Timing chain stretch and supercharger problems can happen around that mileage (kilometerage?) :)
 

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If the concern is electronics, then yes, older Asian and USA makes are going to be much easier to work on. But that is changing. All that electronics technology MBZ has been using over the last 25 years has trickled down into most every make now. Any car built int he last 5 years is going to need some specialized computer equipment and technology skills to work on.
 
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