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1988 "Zender" 300CE Coupe, 2009 Renault Koleos, 2007 Kia Rio Sport
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hi Guys
Being a relatively new MB owner and a first timer I have been contemplating lot's of things regarding my new vehicle and how to look after it. Being a European luxury vehicle I figure it should maybe have better treatment in the engine oil department than perhaps what the local mechanic might drizzle into it's innards !
I spent a fair amount of time reading posts and researching and came up with some sheets from an MB site which I have copied and pasted into my own pages for reference in case they (like so many links) go missing some day.
First up though here's a diagram from MB showing the viscosity/types it suggests for ambient temperature ranges.

 

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1988 "Zender" 300CE Coupe, 2009 Renault Koleos, 2007 Kia Rio Sport
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Discussion Starter · #2 · (Edited)
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1988 "Zender" 300CE Coupe, 2009 Renault Koleos, 2007 Kia Rio Sport
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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
And yes from this list I chose to use : drum roll please........




229.1 Approval and about half the price of Castrol/Mobile/Shell. :baby bottle:
 

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1988 "Zender" 300CE Coupe, 2009 Renault Koleos, 2007 Kia Rio Sport
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Generally depends on the temperature range of the area you live and use the car.

Just rememeber there are perceived advantages and disadvantages to using some oils though.

For example, Melbourne Austrlaia, where I live, is a moderate climate with no snow though it does get cold but it also gets very hot.
Using the chart up top I should match something with 0 to +5 low temp through 30+ high temp.
So I could be by its reckoning use 20W-40 but really thats a pretty thick brew.
As a normal environment I would normally go 10W or 15W.

I have run in the past 5W however the downside to that is if you have any worn parts such as the plug at the front of the timing cover, it seeps and weeps making a mess and inevitably you end up cleaning the stains and replacing oil. The good side to that though is 5W takes shorter amount of time to heat up to normal operating temperature.
And that means on an ageing engine, less wear and tear at start up of a cold engine.

Of course that sort of statement is subjective.
I guess truth would be difficult to prove unless two exactly same engines were run on a test bed under varying temperature but in the same operationally controlled environment.

The big thing to remember though is to look for a product with MB approval if you want to be sure and I think (someone correct me here if this is wrong) full Zinc included in the oil which aids wear and tear.

I use a Penrite spec MB approved 10W-40
 
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