Mercedes-Benz Forum banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
2000 CLK430 2010 S550 4matic
Joined
·
532 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
What is the proper way to either keep MB's anodized trim looking good. My 2000's is decent - I've NEVER polished it but have run the car through a carwash and notice that it seems to "loose" it shine over time. Any way to get it back without removing the coating with a polish as its very thin?

I've seen several Benz's with pink instead of black anodized trim from excessive polishing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
I've found that regular Vaseline works well on the anodized trim on my 70 280s. I use it on the Fuch rims on the 911 also per the Porsche manual. Work it in and buff excess off. Not a permanent fix, but makes a noticeable difference.
 

·
Registered
2000 CLK430 2010 S550 4matic
Joined
·
532 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
I found something that looks interesting and seems like a perm fix. Product seems to first clean it then add some sort of clear coating that brings back the black-ness to the trim. The website shows the process and it looks pretty promising. Think its better than just a wax that washes off. The other thing that would work but not remove any of the water spot oxidation is something like a Klasse acrylic wax coating.

Here is the link:

Black Anodized Aluminum Deoxidizer | Clean Your Oxidized Aluminum
 

·
Registered
2000 E320 Sedan 4Matic
Joined
·
14 Posts
Another option (i am using) is to get a 3M vinyl overlay. The advantage here is you can get flat or glossy black. I have had this stuff on my 2000 for many months and carwashes and it holds up.
 

·
Registered
2000 CLK430 2010 S550 4matic
Joined
·
532 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
I might order the stuff and give it a try - spoke to the vendor and when I lived in NJ I purchased a Porsche from them 20 years ago. The do know what they are talking about and the dealership is seriouisly anal about their cars. Their detaillers were absolutely amazing at the time.

The other option although I have no idea about the cost is just to remove the trim and get them re-anodized. There are places in California that do amazing things although locally I'm a little hesitant about quality - St Louis. The market here for custom work isn't very good and the craftmanship is pretty poor. The other option is getting them painted in gloss black similar to the way BMW does their sport package trim - but finding a shop willing to do that here is pretty difficult and I'm sure pretty expensive. Finding someone here to do microtouchup is impossible - they want to just repaint the entire panel and have no knowledge of the latest body techniques that fix small things without a repaint. Love the California market - they have everything and take detailling seriously.

Ordering the bits and pieces new is expensive - like 200 for each rear window - although the front top stripe isn't so bad - its the window pieces except for the front are insanely expensive.

If my car had about 40K instead of 70K it might be worth it but for the cost of the revitalizer kit - if deepens the color and makes it shiny for a decent amount of time its worth it. As long as you don't have color rub through and chips it should work fine.
 

·
Premium Member
2001 E320 - Brilliant Silver/Ash: 107,000+
Joined
·
17,193 Posts
I found something that looks interesting and seems like a perm fix. Product seems to first clean it then add some sort of clear coating that brings back the black-ness to the trim. The website shows the process and it looks pretty promising. Think its better than just a wax that washes off. The other thing that would work but not remove any of the water spot oxidation is something like a Klasse acrylic wax coating.

Here is the link:

Black Anodized Aluminum Deoxidizer | Clean Your Oxidized Aluminum
Thanks for posting this link, it looks promising.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
341 Posts
Plastic Anodized ‘Chrome’ Trim

Oxidation is the way aluminium protects itself, the oxidation or white rust (a small portion of the metals top layer) becomes a sacrificial layer. So it makes sense to provide a protective product to act as the sacrificial layer instead of the metal. It may be possible to restore the original appearance by an abrasive cleaning using a light abrasive (P21S Polishing Soap) or 3M Scotch-Brite 7448 - Grey (ultra fine). Coarser abrasives such as sandpaper or steel mesh should be avoided, along with acid or alkaline cleaners, any of which would damage the coating.

So it makes sense to provide a protective product to act as the sacrificial layer instead of the metal. After washing surface use remove the oxidation with P21S Polishing Soap and then apply Klasse all in one (AIO) to clean the metal water spots or stubborn stains and provide protection. Use with a terry weave towel to increase abrasiveness if required
 

·
Registered
2000 Merc. E320 4matic Wagon 210.282 Desert Silver
Joined
·
827 Posts
I used a German made paste called Flitz that I have successfully used on my firearms with similar materials and coatings. It's so delicate you can even use it on a blued barrel that started to rust from drunken neglect.

I use flits on my guns, knives, rims, aluminum and chrome. If you do the gray anodized trim on your mercedes, use a small pea sized dab on a microfiber cloth and use long strokes to get the discoloration or water marks out of the surface. It leaves a protective finish and if you get any on the paint, it wont matter. Just wipe off and rewax. Try not to get it on the plastics as it is a pain in the ass to get the dried paste off. If you do, get it out when it's fresh.

You will find all sorts of good uses for flitz. It's amazing stuff and if you have brass, you will be in heaven!

N
 

·
Premium Member
2002 CLK 430 Convt. '91 420 SEL, '80 240D, '93 190E Sportline, '70 300 SEL 6.3
Joined
·
1,555 Posts

·
Premium Member
2002 CLK 430 Convt. '91 420 SEL, '80 240D, '93 190E Sportline, '70 300 SEL 6.3
Joined
·
1,555 Posts
The Real Story from Kent @ mercedessource - a trusted expert!




.... From Kent's Garage:

For the past two months I have been working on a solution for restoring
oxidized aluminum trip around the windows on most of the older Mercedes Benz,
in particular the 116, 123 and 126 chassis. This is a huge problem that has
plagued owners for years. When this anodized trim becomes milky and spotted
in makes a old Benz look just plain ugly. In recent weeks I have made over
100 attempts on different pieces of heavily oxidized trim using over 30
different products and compounds, some of which I have "brewed up" myself. I
even used chocolate syrup as a binder to keep the polished compound suspended
longer. It worked and smelled pretty good, but left a sugary film on the trim
that you have to agressively clean off when done polishing. :)

I particularly have not been happy with the touted clear coat solutions from
a couple of Internet vendors. At first I thought clear coat was the answer.
It is sure a good thing I heavily tested the products before I shipped them
out to you. I have not found a one-part clear coat that can hold up to the
rigors of scratching. These clear coats could actually be scraped off with a
sharp finger nail after drying for 2 to 3 weeks. Good enough for a used car
dealer but not what I was looking for. So it was back to the drawing board to
find another solution. Yesterday I did a complete 300TD wagon in four hours
using my new power buffing approach. All the trim not only shines but looks
brand new. It required testing multiple tools, tool attachments and buffing
pads. In the end I had to mix my own brew that I will call Kent's Miracle
Paste. These is no quick and easy solution. But if you care about the looks
of your Benz this is a 3 to 6 hour job depending on how bad the oxidation is.
At least when using a power tool you will not have to wear out your elbow as
I have done... :)

Mercedes trim has to be the toughest anodized aluminum I have ever seen. It
is so hard that none of the convential aluminum hand polishes work. If you
don't believe me try it yourself!

" Clear coating proved to NOT be a lasting solution."

* Video Part 1: Overview of the problem: [13]
* Video Part 2: What does NOT work [14]
* Video Part 3 : Overview of the final solution (to be posted the later part
of September).
 

·
Registered
85 380SE 184K, 83 380SL 175K
Joined
·
148 Posts
I've found that regular Vaseline works well on the anodized trim on my 70 280s. I use it on the Fuch rims on the 911 also per the Porsche manual. Work it in and buff excess off. Not a permanent fix, but makes a noticeable difference.
This sounds like a great solution. I'm going to give it a try on my 126.

Thanks,
Brian
 

·
Registered
2000 Merc. E320 4matic Wagon 210.282 Desert Silver
Joined
·
827 Posts

·
Registered
97 S600 Coupe. Former 83 300D, 97 C230, 93 400E, 92 500SL, a few others
Joined
·
412 Posts
Everything I'm looking at on this subject pertains to older models - what about the 90s cars with the BLACK anodized trim that turns light gold? Is there any hope? It looks to me like it has a black coating on it - or is it actually anodized? Whatever it is, it looks like it could be scratched. I'm not sure something abrasive is the answer. Anyone have a definitive solution?
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top