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Discussion Starter #1
My mechanic says that my '86 560 engine needs valve guide seals but that he no longer only replaces seals due to to many problems on previous jobs. He says that he must do a complete valve job for between $2500 to $3000. Any comments or advice on this would be greatly appreciated.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
I think he is talking about:<br> - replace valve guides<br> - resurface head(s) to make sure it's flat (usually send it out to the machine shop)<br> - clean/replace and reseat valves<br> - replace head gasket(s)<br> - replace valve gasket(s)<br> - replace valve seals<br> <br> You are basically looking at a typical 'head' job. He can leave the bottom half (block, pistons) on the car, but some remove the whole engine out to get elbow room. <br> <br> While you are at it check hydraulic lifters, cam lobes, and shims since he has to take those out anyway.<br> <br> Depending on his definition of 'valve job', his figures are in the ball park, assuming he is using original MB parts.<br> <br> Good luck.
 

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When engine first starts it does not smoke unless you race engine and then it blows a small cloud of grey smoke and stops until I drive it and stop at a light and then when I accelerate it sends small amount of grey smoke. This does not happen everytime though but more often then not. There is evidence of oil use from the dip stick, probably 2 qts in the last 4 months and this is only driving about 1500 miles. I do not drive car everyday, mostly on weekends.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Ask your mechanic if he's done a compression test with the radiator cap off to see if water is getting into the combustion chambers. At least get the heads done also you may have a major oil leak from the motor somewhere. Depending on how many k's/ miles you've done the bottom end may need attention also.
 

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Just to add a couple of comments to Andrew's. Grey smoke usually point to rich fuel and blue to oil burn.<br> <br> Make sure oil is not leaking through main oil seals, distributor o-ring, and head gaskets. If you are loosing that much oil, you must be smoking (blue) big time. Check the plugs to see if they are 'sooty' (rich fuel) or 'oily cake' (oil leak).<br> <br> It's not always a good thing for a customer to start arguing with a mechanic (I've seen that alot at my friend's workshop). But if you are tight with your mechanic, ask him to verify these. I'm assuming he had already done that.<br> <br> Check your oil cap (for white/grayish foam) for excessive moisture, and oily anti-freeze/coolant. Both cases lead to possible busted head gasket; hence, lost in compression.<br> <br>
 
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