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Discussion Starter #1
bringing back manufacturing has been one of trump's signature policies-
which industry is next?
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Besides manufacturing, pubs have made big promises for coal- a big focus for the last 3 years-

let me see what numbers i can find there...
 

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Fracking is starting to loose its shine too - rig count is down from around 1600 in 2015 to about 700 today, down about 150 or 20% from the beginning of the year.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
ok well there's this article from march. maybe things have really turned around since then-


Trump administration concedes coal is collapsing on its watch as renewables soar
Under Trump, coal’s share of U.S. power mix falls to lowest level on record.
JOE ROMMMAR 13, 2019, 12:14 PM

GOP PRESIDENTIAL NOMINEE DONALD TRUMP HOLDS A SIGN SUPPORTING COAL DURING A RALLY IN WILKES-BARRE PA, ON OCTOBER 10, 2016.

Coal production will drop nearly 8 percent in 2019, and then another 4.5 percent in 2020, according to a new Trump administration analysis.
But over the same two years, total renewable power generation will rise 30 percent, the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) projected on Tuesday.
So despite campaigning on a pledge to save the dirtiest of fossil fuels, President Donald Trump is overseeing a collapse in both domestic coal production and coal generation.
Coal power is increasingly unprofitable in a world of cheap natural gas and rapidly dropping prices for renewable energy sources like solar and wind.

THE EIA PROJECTS COAL'S SHARE OF THE US POWER MAX WILL KEEP DROPPING UNDER PRESIDENT TRUMP. CREDIT: BLOOMBERG.

In fact, the EIA’s March “Short-Term Energy Outlook” projects that coal’s share of the U.S. power mix will drop from 27.4 percent in 2018 to 24.7 percent this year — its lowest level on record — and then to 23.4 percent in 2020.
Meanwhile, the EIA projects that wind, solar, and other non-hydropower renewables will rise from 10 percent of U.S. electricity generation in 2018 to 11 percent in 2019 and 13 percent in 2020.
Significantly, the EIA “expects wind’s annual share of electricity generation will exceed hydropower’s share for the first time” in 2019. And while hydropower’s share is expected to remain flat for the foreseeable future, wind power continues to soar.
So what went wrong for Trump? After all, he had said he would end President Barack Obama’s supposed “war on coal.” But in reality he presided over a faster rate of coal plant retirements in his first two years than Obama saw in his entire first term.
The reality is no such war ever existed.
The inescapable problem for coal was — and still is — economics, not politics. As one leading industry analyst explained last year, under Trump “the economics of coal have gotten worse.”
Wyoming’s coal plants are so unprofitable Republicans turned to a ‘socialist program’ to save them
The ongoing price drops in wind and solar power mean that in many areas, building and running new renewables is now cheaper than just running old coal plants. And new renewables have actually become more affordable than new natural gas plants.
So we can expect coal’s steady decline in power generation to continue, while solar and wind will keep soaring.
 

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Good. The sooner coal goes away, the better.

Too bad for those goobers who banked on Trump's promise that coal would be the energy of the future.
 

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Good. The sooner coal goes away, the better.

Too bad for those goobers who banked on Trump's promise that coal would be the energy of the future.
But but but… all those super-environmentally friendly EVs need electricity that has to be generated somehow....
 

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But but but… all those super-environmentally friendly EVs need electricity that has to be generated somehow....
Actually, you do have a point. Yes, there is such a thing as clean coal, provided we require the plants to implement it, and it can be a stop-gap power source while we bring yet cleaner methods of power generation online.

And as for manufacturing...aren't those Teslas made here in the United States, and isn't the GigaFactory--where the batteries are made--also located here in the United States?
 

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How much limestone does a "clean" coal power plant get through each year? The answer is nuclear, but as someone recently pointed out, there really hasn't been any serious R&D (Bill Gates aside) on nuclear for 30 or 40 years.
 

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The solar companies offering "deals" here in Houston are trying to screw people over. 5% interest (if your credit is excellent) and double the retail price for panels that'll probably only last 10 years. You're lucky to save $50 a month.
 

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No coal out here and solar getting better and better. My electric bill is near nothing since we get ‘paid’ for feeding the grid.

View attachment 2606290
So, Nutz.. What kind of a solar set-up do you have ?.. You're producing more than you use??.. Can't beat that.. I get hammered by the power company every month.. My only experience with solar was panels on my boat.. Which was a long time ago.. $10 a watt is what I was paying for panels...
 

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11 panels making like 3.0kw. About 75% covered under normal usage. Don’t run AC hardly either, so that helps.

If you going to install in house, see what tax credits are available and if any permit restrictions.
 

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It must be nice, only needing 3kw to live comfortable.. If it's not my AC going full time, it's the electric furnace that sends the power bill through the roof..
 

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5600 square feet and Texas heat means our AC alone would need closer to 10 kW. And with the complicated shape of our roof it isn't really feasible anyway.
 

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That's the problem with existing construction. Take my neighborhood as an example. The houses were not built with strong southern exposure in mind for the roofs. There are plenty of trees, as my neighborhood was (thankfully!) not clear-cut before construction, so we actually have some greenery. Having 70-year-old oak, maple, hickory, etc. trees in our yards is not uncommon at all, and I consider that generally a good thing.

The issue with that is solar panel output. All those trees, with all those leaves, block direct sunlight to the panels for the vast majority of the year, thus the benefit isn't nearly what it would be in, say, the Southwest United States.

Sometimes one does get lucky and has an opportunity for a house with good southern exposure. That means solar panels/shingles are a fine idea for such locations.

New construction is pretty much all infested with HOA's in my area, which tends to preclude things like solar panel construction. Remember, these are the same HOA Nazi's who got bent out of shape about a WWII Medal of Honor awardee flying the American Flag on a pole in front of his house (major political pressure got them to back down, but it took the help of a US Senator and the Governor of Virginia--no small thing). So, unfortunately, solar panels apparently aren't valued around here much, at least among the builders. The real estate market is hot here, so the builders don't have incentive to take things like solar power into account.

So, the only real-world way you're going to get solar power in this area is if you have your house custom-built, which some people do. Even then, they're not thinking about solar; they're too busy thinking, "how big of a McMansion can I fit on this lot?" Yikes. I'd rather have a smaller-to-moderate-sized, very energy-efficient house than a monster that costs a fortune to keep cooled and heated.
 

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Our house has a large total roof area but it's "architectural" meaning there are very few large continuous areas you could put solar panels on, which is disappointing because the main roof areas taken as a whole face east and west, with virtually no tree shading.Then we would have to deal with the aesthetics. Texas state laws actually stop HOAs banning solar panels so that's not an issue. However, the rip-off merchants are trying to sell second rate panels at inflated prices. Moreover, their finance schemes mean if we were to sell our house before the finance is paid off we'd have to pay off the loan entirely then hope the new buyer wants them (and will pay the extra to get them), or we could take them with us (yeah, real useful if the house we buy already has its own or if we move into a condo). QED for fifty bucks a month saved I'm not going to bother.
 
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