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I am new here and new to Mercedes. I took an M113 motor (5.0L displacement) in a trade a few weeks ago. It spins freely and if I can't use, I'll part it out.

If I understand correctly, the 5.4L variant is a stroked version of the 5.0L. Besides crankshaft, rods, and pistons, what would have to change mechanically to turn the 5.0 into a 5.4? Is the main bearing arrangement the same (diameter, number of mains, main cap bolting) or completely different? The usual Google Fu and a search of this forum haven't yielded much information. Thanks in advance.
 

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2000 S430, 2003 S430, 2000 S500, 2003 S600 TT, and 2005 E320 CDI
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Yes, it is a stroked version of the "standard" 5.0L. And the M113 series of engines, generally, tend to be very good and durable. That's why there are so many of 'em available. :)

You'll probably also need the ECM from a 5.4L. That also means you'll need the other "immobilizer" parts, such as the shifter, the EIS (ignition switch), and the ignition key. This is all part of M-B's "theft-relevant parts" nonsense which doesn't actually do much, if anything, to deter chop-shops.

Why not just add a small turbocharger on the 5.0L engine, with a fuel remap? Wouldn't that cost about the same? You'd also get good performance at altitudes as a nice side-benefit.
 

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1999 C43 AMG
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I am certainly no expert, but I would think that adding turbo chargers would mean putting the engine under stresses it was never designed for. For example, going from naturally aspirated to forced induction means that the combustion chamber his having to endure higher pressures due to air and fuel being forced and crammed into the combustion chamber which is then creating added pressure on the piston, piston rings, con rods, cylinder head bolts. This added pressure would increase the wear and tear of the engine.

In order to achieve the same durability, the relevant components would have to be designed to withstand these added forces from forced induction. the pistons, rings, connecting rods, crankshaft and crank bearing must be designed to push the pistons and rings to compress all of the extra air and fuel into a given amount of space inside the combustion chamber, which is pushing back against these components. For every action (forcing more air and fuel into a combustion chamber via turbos) there is an equal and opposite reaction (that force is pressing against the piston and crank assembly as well as the top of the combustion chamber and that force is then transferred to the fasteners that hold the cylinder head in place).

Without the engine being strengthened in a manner that is commensurate with the added pressure of a given amount of boost, it is logical to conclude that the engine will suffer catastrophic failure in a shorter amount of time due to accelerated wear. Things like popping cylinder head bolts or destroying piston rings or things similar to this.

In addition to adding turbos, one must add an intercooler assembly to cool the incoming compressed air that is on its way to the combustion chamber. As air heats up when it is compressed, via turbo or superchargers, it must be cooled to increase the air's density. Compressed air, that is cooled, will create a stronger combustion force when it is mixed with the appropriate amount of fuel and ignited because it is more dense. As opposed to compressed air that is hot (less dense) when mixed with fuel and ignited.

Going from N/A to F/I is a tricky proposition if the engine has not been beefed up to handle the added stresses. Unless the boost level is kept at a very conservative level so as to preserve the engine integrity. Lower boost equals lower horsepower gains. Given this, what else is to be concluded except that spending a great deal of money to gain relatively little horse power by dialing the boost way way back to preserve the engine makes very little sense.

I, once again, am no expert in engine performance or design. These are the idle comments from a dull mind, shared freely after a generous helping of alcohol. As such they are merely my thoughts based upon that which I have heard from those who are smarter than me, and should be taken with a grain of salt.

I wish everyone a most wonderful Christmas this holiday season. Now, I must refill my beer!
 

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1999 SL500 (5.5 AMG)
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Late to the party, but better late than never.
I did the swap, it was straight forward.

The wiring harness is different depending on which car the engine came from. Mine came from a W220 S55 AMG

So it was a straight drop and I used the existing intake manifold, throttle body and wiring harness from my car. You must use the injectors from the 5.4 engine too obviously.

I kept my transmission so no need for a new TCM. I also used my existing ECU and all it needs is a tune to compliments the new engine.


 
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