Mercedes-Benz Forum banner
1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
87 190d 2.5TD, 98 ML320, 09 CLS550
Joined
·
129 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I wanted to document an issue that is becoming more and more common on the M112 & M113 engines now that the years are starting to pile up.

Over the past few years... I have heard of many individuals dive into a head gasket job because of "oil in coolant" or "coolant in the oil". Many perform the entire head gasket job only to see the issue remains.

I have noticed this issue as well on 5 different engines now. 3 of my own personal vehicles and 2 from friends/family.

The reality is: the head gasket itself rarely fails. Most usually, the cause of this issue is one (or both) of the 2 main rubber o-rings that seat between the timing case and engine block.

There were reports years back (when I had my repair shop) of this "rare issue". But I would like to reassure everyone here: this is no longer a rare occurrence. Due to the nature of what happens, this issue will become ever-more common as we move forward. Here is why: the material used for those o-rings actually swells over the years. On one side, that o-ring is exposed to coolant. On the other, it is exposed to oil (even though the factory applies a very thin coat of silicone, that silicone breaks down and eventually gets onto the o-ring).

Once this o-ring swells enough, it literally swells INTO the passage-way where the coolant flows and eventually... gets pushed out of it's spot by the coolant-flow and washed out-of-place and ends up somewhere in the engine.

It usually comes to rest in the cylinder head.

Even a couple engines that did NOT have this issue - but were tore down for other reasons: those o-rings were not far from having failed the same way.

Here are some pictures...

Just removed this timing cover from my 1998 ML320:
Motor vehicle Machine Auto part Wood Engineering


Notice this passage is missing the o-ring?
Motor vehicle Bicycle part Automotive wheel system Gas Rim


This is where I found the o-ring... this seems to be the most common place it comes to rest: the cylinder head.
Automotive tire Motor vehicle Wood Bicycle part Rim


A comparison of the original o-ring next to a new (MB OEM!) one.. Notice how severe the swelling is? The o-ring literally swells up INTO the pathway of coolant until the coolant washed is out of it's position. Luckily, they apply a tiny amount of silicone from the factory on the oil side, so when this happens - the leak/contamination is often more subtle and not a catastrophic event. Nonetheless, it WILL begin to leak oil into the coolant or coolant into the oil.
Automotive tire Tire Gas Rim Tints and shades


Again, these particular photos are from my 1998 ML320. HOWEVER - I have seen this failure (or about-to-fail) on just about every 112/113 engine I have opened up over the past 3 years (and I have opened several). So this issue affects any chassis with the M112/M113 engines.

Keep in mind also: these o-rings are essentially the same material that your oil level sensor o-ring is made of. If you have ever had to change the oil-level-sensor o-ring, you can bet these timing cover o-rings are not in much better shape! And consider this: after 150-200k miles.. virtually every M112 or M113 engine has had to have the oil level sensor o-ring replaced by now.

I believe over the next few years, this issue will crop up more and more and these o-rings continue to swell and get washed out-of-place. As this happens, many will be led to believe that the head gasket has failed when it has NOT. Unfortunately, if you happen to pull the timing cover and find one of the o-rings missing, the only safe thing to do is pull the heads to ensure you do not leave this floating around in the block as it could cause serious issues eventually if left where-it-is.

Anyway.. I wanted to get this out there so others know: if you pull the heads.. PULL THE TIMING COVER AS WELL!!! Chances are almost 100% that - given the age of these motors now - those o-rings are either near-failure or have already failed.

Hope this helps others.

Maybe make this a sticky somewhere?

Tags: M112, M113, Cylinder Head Gasket, water coolant in oil, oil in water coolant, still leaking, timing cover, leaking
 

·
C9H9N Offensive Odor Exuder
2002 ML320, 2005 S430 4MATIC RIP, 2010 F150 Crew Cab
Joined
·
11,442 Posts
If mine fails I will push it to the junkyard. On a good day when it’s dark it might be worth 1500. Age is the real killer. Not miles.
 

·
Registered
99' E320, 00' E320, 03' E320T, 05' C230K
Joined
·
4,151 Posts
o_O WOW........just WOW! This is not what I want to hear as I currently have three cars with the M112 engine. We were all told that these engines were "bullet proof" and all of mine so far has been exemplary.

Is it hard to replace that seal as a preventative measure? Might have to drive it until it dies as they are just worth a little more than pocket change.
 

·
Registered
99' E320, 00' E320, 03' E320T, 05' C230K
Joined
·
4,151 Posts
If mine fails I will push it to the junkyard. On a good day when it’s dark it might be worth 1500. Age is the real killer. Not miles.
I don't think I would even push it to a junkyard. Just abandon it were it stops.
 

·
W163 and General M Gremlin
Joined
·
8,281 Posts
Good info Dean,

Im going to move this thread over to the w163, since your example here pertains to it.
Let's hear what other comments my come in.

Cheers.
 

·
Registered
2002 ML 500
Joined
·
98 Posts
I wanted to document an issue that is becoming more and more common on the M112 & M113 engines now that the years are starting to pile up.
Good info.

What’s involved in pulling the timing cover off to replace this O-ring as a preventative measure?
 

·
Registered
87 190d 2.5TD, 98 ML320, 09 CLS550
Joined
·
129 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
Changing/replacing these o-rings requires removal of the timing cover.

The timing cover is sandwiched between the upper oil pan and the cylinder head.

Either the heads need to be removed OR the upper oil pan needs to come off.

On the W163, the upper oil pan can not easily (or at all?) be removed while the engine is in the vehicle. And given how easy engine removal is on the W163.. I just cannot see why anyone would not just pull it and perform a re-seal.

I have heard of people actually removing the timing cover without removing the cylinder heads OR the oil pans. Not sure how, but...

Honestly.. these engines ARE pretty solid. This particular ML320 has been to central Mexico (Hidalgo) and back to Colorado a few times already - PULLING 3,000+ pounds of enclosed trailer through some of the worse mountains you can imagine. Engine still runs smooth-as-can-be. Actually... it runs smoother than my 2009 CLS550 ever has.

A basic re-seal of the entire engine is NOT that bad of a job. Entire engine can be removed in less than 4 hours.

Cylinder head gaskets, new head bolts, new timing chain guide rails, and a "timing cover re-seal kit" from FCP all total less than $400 in parts. And I will easily get another 100k-150k miles from this engine. Still less than the cost of a single car payment for a new vehicle. So the end-result is (IMO) well worth the effort.

Not trying to advertise for FCP here, but.. for $160-ish.. the "timing cover re-seal kit" comes with it all: breather hoses (all of them), front and rear main seals, all the o-rings, VC gaskets, ETC. For another $100.. the head gaskets and valve stem seals are easily sourced on fleabay. The same for the guide rails.

The timing chain itself is a double-row chain. Very robust and really no need to replace it. I seriously doubt it will give you any issues before at least 800k. The guide rails are all usually starting to crack and fracture by now.

I have pushed the M112 well into 400K miles on another ML. Original transmission, too. My last ML500 that was left w/ the ex-wife was about to hit 400k before she got it. Still ran great last I saw it. That one also had original transmission.

Recently did this on an SLK and C as well. Re-sealed the entire engines. Same issue: o-rings swelled up and got pushed through the cooling system. Pull the motors, perform a re-seal and drop the engine back in. Not that hard, really.

4-6 hours to pull, 4-6 hours cleaning and replacing everything. Another 4 hours to put the motor back in.

On an 163 ML, I can pull the engine in about 3.5 hours. Once on a stand, the re-seal goes really quick.

Going back to the comments regarding sending these to the junk yard...

Perhaps. But it depends on the overall condition of the vehicle, I suppose. If you have one in very-good to pristine shape (I personally keep my stuff in top shape).. It is hard to replace a good used vehicle for under $3500. And even at that price: you do not know what you are buying or will end up with. Of coarse, if you can do this work yourself - or with the help of a pal who can help you, it should seem to be a no-brainer. But even at a shop that charges upwards of $100/hr - this entire job should not be more than $2500-$3000. And again, I would like to point out: are you seriously going to buy a used car these days for under $3500 that will not need some major work?

Even a $5,000 used car is going to typically cost you a couple thousand in repairs over the first 2-3 years easily. Step up to a $10k used car and if you do not drive too much... You may be okay for a few years with some luck.

But I have seen many early-2000's era benz and beemers that are just absolutely ragged the hell out. People use them, run them into the ground, and once they die - roll them into the pull-a-part. I get it, honestly. But my vehicles often make very long trips into some very remote areas of central Mexico while pulling trailers. I cannot afford to be broke down in such areas and therefore keep my stuff in top-running shape. And buying a new $60k (or more) car - just to pile the miles on - does not make any financial sense.

Once you perform a re-seal, these engines will easily turn out another 150k (or more) miles. So well worth the investment.

My last ML320 cost me: $750. I have put almost 100K on it and invested less than $1500 over 3 years to keep it going.

My last ML500 (2002 sport!) cost me: $240. Woman did not want to pay the $$ to replace the conductor plate. It is at 200k, and after a re-seal, I will get another easy 100k out of that.

I have purchased some amazing E39 BMW 5-series as well: the M62 engines are known for timing chain guide failure. My last 2001 540i (6 speed!!) was less than $600. Over half the E39 and E38 BMW's found at your local pull-a-part are the result of the owner not wanting to pay the shop rate to replace them guide rails.

I patiently wait for you all to "scrap" that junk so I can buy it for next-to-nothing lol. I only wish I had done the same w/ my CLS550 purchase.

I paid WAY too much for that thing.

But back to the original topic here...

This issue affects all the M112 and M113 engines. C-Class, G-Wagon, Roadsters, E-Class.. Those o-rings are slowly absorbing the engine fluids after 20+ years and are all eventually going to swell and cause internal leaks. Just a matter of time now.
 

·
Registered
2002 ML 500
Joined
·
98 Posts
Changing/replacing these o-rings requires removal of the timing cover.

The timing cover is sandwiched between the upper oil pan and the cylinder head.

Either the heads need to be removed OR the upper oil pan needs to come off.

On the W163, the upper oil pan can not easily (or at all?) be removed while the engine is in the vehicle. And given how easy engine removal is on the W163.. I just cannot see why anyone would not just pull it and perform a re-seal.

I have heard of people actually removing the timing cover without removing the cylinder heads OR the oil pans. Not sure how, but...

Honestly.. these engines ARE pretty solid. This particular ML320 has been to central Mexico (Hidalgo) and back to Colorado a few times already - PULLING 3,000+ pounds of enclosed trailer through some of the worse mountains you can imagine. Engine still runs smooth-as-can-be. Actually... it runs smoother than my 2009 CLS550 ever has.

A basic re-seal of the entire engine is NOT that bad of a job. Entire engine can be removed in less than 4 hours.

Cylinder head gaskets, new head bolts, new timing chain guide rails, and a "timing cover re-seal kit" from FCP all total less than $400 in parts. And I will easily get another 100k-150k miles from this engine. Still less than the cost of a single car payment for a new vehicle. So the end-result is (IMO) well worth the effort.

Not trying to advertise for FCP here, but.. for $160-ish.. the "timing cover re-seal kit" comes with it all: breather hoses (all of them), front and rear main seals, all the o-rings, VC gaskets, ETC. For another $100.. the head gaskets and valve stem seals are easily sourced on fleabay. The same for the guide rails.

The timing chain itself is a double-row chain. Very robust and really no need to replace it. I seriously doubt it will give you any issues before at least 800k. The guide rails are all usually starting to crack and fracture by now.

I have pushed the M112 well into 400K miles on another ML. Original transmission, too. My last ML500 that was left w/ the ex-wife was about to hit 400k before she got it. Still ran great last I saw it. That one also had original transmission.

Recently did this on an SLK and C as well. Re-sealed the entire engines. Same issue: o-rings swelled up and got pushed through the cooling system. Pull the motors, perform a re-seal and drop the engine back in. Not that hard, really.

4-6 hours to pull, 4-6 hours cleaning and replacing everything. Another 4 hours to put the motor back in.

On an 163 ML, I can pull the engine in about 3.5 hours. Once on a stand, the re-seal goes really quick.

Going back to the comments regarding sending these to the junk yard...

Perhaps. But it depends on the overall condition of the vehicle, I suppose. If you have one in very-good to pristine shape (I personally keep my stuff in top shape).. It is hard to replace a good used vehicle for under $3500. And even at that price: you do not know what you are buying or will end up with. Of coarse, if you can do this work yourself - or with the help of a pal who can help you, it should seem to be a no-brainer. But even at a shop that charges upwards of $100/hr - this entire job should not be more than $2500-$3000. And again, I would like to point out: are you seriously going to buy a used car these days for under $3500 that will not need some major work?

Even a $5,000 used car is going to typically cost you a couple thousand in repairs over the first 2-3 years easily. Step up to a $10k used car and if you do not drive too much... You may be okay for a few years with some luck.

But I have seen many early-2000's era benz and beemers that are just absolutely ragged the hell out. People use them, run them into the ground, and once they die - roll them into the pull-a-part. I get it, honestly. But my vehicles often make very long trips into some very remote areas of central Mexico while pulling trailers. I cannot afford to be broke down in such areas and therefore keep my stuff in top-running shape. And buying a new $60k (or more) car - just to pile the miles on - does not make any financial sense.

Once you perform a re-seal, these engines will easily turn out another 150k (or more) miles. So well worth the investment.

My last ML320 cost me: $750. I have put almost 100K on it and invested less than $1500 over 3 years to keep it going.

My last ML500 (2002 sport!) cost me: $240. Woman did not want to pay the $$ to replace the conductor plate. It is at 200k, and after a re-seal, I will get another easy 100k out of that.

I have purchased some amazing E39 BMW 5-series as well: the M62 engines are known for timing chain guide failure. My last 2001 540i (6 speed!!) was less than $600. Over half the E39 and E38 BMW's found at your local pull-a-part are the result of the owner not wanting to pay the shop rate to replace them guide rails.

I patiently wait for you all to "scrap" that junk so I can buy it for next-to-nothing lol. I only wish I had done the same w/ my CLS550 purchase.

I paid WAY too much for that thing.

But back to the original topic here...

This issue affects all the M112 and M113 engines. C-Class, G-Wagon, Roadsters, E-Class.. Those o-rings are slowly absorbing the engine fluids after 20+ years and are all eventually going to swell and cause internal leaks. Just a matter of time now.
Thanks again for the info.
At 190K miles on my ML500, this is probably something I should consider doing sooner or later. Maybe a good project for next summer. (I doubt I’ll put 2.000 miles on it between now and then.)

Edit - are there any specialty tools required for this job? (Or if not required, maybe highly beneficial?) Just for reference, I don’t run a shop or anything like that but have built/rebuilt a fair number of car and bike engines and am a machinist sometimes too, but don’t have much specific experience with Mercedes.

Wish you were in the Pacific Northwest, I’d happily pay you the $$ you mentioned for this job, just because I have way too many other projects to get done these days.
 

·
W163 and General M Gremlin
Joined
·
8,281 Posts
May be move it to the R129 section as well.

Great info thanks, my 2000 320 is on 145k so might be worth looking into.
I can copy the OPs post#1 over to R129 and provide a link to this one should members there wish to read any comments here on this thread.
 

·
Registered
87 190d 2.5TD, 98 ML320, 09 CLS550
Joined
·
129 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
SPECIAL TOOLS NEEDED:

Beyond the basic "engine removal" stuff (cherry picker, engine stand, etc...)

You need the harmonic balancer holder tool in order to remove/install the crank bolt. Can be easily sourced on fleabay and the amazon for about $60.

Some of the early engines did NOT have a hex nut, instead they used a 17MM allen bolt. Not a very common size to find in most allen socket sets. Found online pretty cheap. Autozone also usually stocks a "Special sized allen socket set" for $15 that has 3 over-sized sockets - including the 17mm. If you ever worked on Audis, you likely already have one :)

If you have an older-model engine w/ mechanical fan clutch (newer cars use electric fan).. you need a fan clutch removal tool. Another $20 or so online.

You will likely want to stick in the new valve stem seals that come with head gasket kits. A cheap $20 "c clamp style" valve spring compressor (ebay or amazon) works just fine for this.

If you are OCD, a parts washer or at least a large plastic tote. Fill it with diesel (or parts washer solvent) in order to get everything clean.

I will snap some pics of my current overhaul shortly.

I have had my 190D restoration project on the back burner for over a year now, but I think I may be doing this to my 2002 ML500 soon. I will likely create a very long "How to remove, re-seal, and replace engine" thread with ton of pics once I start that one.

I no longer have the repair business, and in-fact am doing this current job in the back yard with NO GARAGE and on a sandy yard! Even on the sandy yard, I can have the ML engine out in just under 4 hours. So YES, this can easily be done DIY style.

As soon as the housing market cools down, I hope to purchase a new home WITH a garage, but until then... I am stuck with what I have.
 

·
Registered
1999 CL500
Joined
·
7 Posts
Really digging this thread and love the way you think :)

Looking forward to this M113 "semi-overhaul" project of yours.

God bless!
 

·
Registered
2000 E 320 Wagon + 2002 ML 500 SUV
Joined
·
1,734 Posts
Dean, I note you are restoring a 190D.

What year ? We had a 1984 190E - the first Benz I bought my wife, back in the day.

Great car - man she loved that thing. But slow as could be. Most gutless 4 cylinder. Probably hampered by the Auto tranny - should have only been offer as a manual tranny.

Gold in color, bought in pristine shape at 90,000 from original owner in about 1992 or so.

He'd drive em 5 or 6 years almost to 100k then sell them.

Paid a reasonable $8500, we drove it for about 5 years & sold it well.

Were it a Diesel, I may have kept it.

Is yours a TD or just Diesel ? Love to hear how you obtained or any details you can share.

Best Regards - David in Texas
 

·
Registered
2002 ML 500
Joined
·
98 Posts
Really good info Dean, thanks! I look forward to your reseal thread on the ML500, especially since I have the same yet and model.
 

·
Registered
01 ML55
Joined
·
390 Posts
you can do the job w/o removing the heads but you have to be careful not to damage the head gasket when you reinstall the timing cover.

its a big job. look at tasos mochatos (sp) YT channel. he just did this on a M113k. from what I've SEEN (read as NOT DONE) this would be easier than the guides on the M62s (whoever else here was speaking BMW). if you're a DIY'er and can do this and have the time, tools, talents, etc. I wouldn't hesitate.
 

·
Registered
87 190d 2.5TD, 98 ML320, 09 CLS550
Joined
·
129 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Dean, I note you are restoring a 190D.

What year ? We had a 1984 190E - the first Benz I bought my wife, back in the day.

Great car - man she loved that thing. But slow as could be. Most gutless 4 cylinder. Probably hampered by the Auto tranny - should have only been offer as a manual tranny.

Gold in color, bought in pristine shape at 90,000 from original owner in about 1992 or so.

He'd drive em 5 or 6 years almost to 100k then sell them.

Paid a reasonable $8500, we drove it for about 5 years & sold it well.

Were it a Diesel, I may have kept it.

Is yours a TD or just Diesel ? Love to hear how you obtained or any details you can share.

Best Regards - David in Texas
Yeah.. restoring it for the second time. Only this time - a comprehensive restoration. Down. To. The. Bare. Chassis.

See the thread here:

1987 190D 2.5 Turbo (factory). Got 2 of em, actually. Entire story is in the thread.

Between the pandemic and the house I was renting getting sold... that project has been on hold until I get my garage space back.

you can do the job w/o removing the heads but you have to be careful not to damage the head gasket when you reinstall the timing cover.

its a big job. look at tasos mochatos (sp) YT channel. he just did this on a M113k. from what I've SEEN (read as NOT DONE) this would be easier than the guides on the M62s (whoever else here was speaking BMW). if you're a DIY'er and can do this and have the time, tools, talents, etc. I wouldn't hesitate.
Yes, it can be done but... the heads are easy to pull and new gaskets+bolts are cheap. The main reason I personally pull the heads while engine is out: valve stem seals and ability to do a deep clean on all the carbon. Both of these CAN also be done with heads still installed but... why? 10 minutes to remove heads... another 15-20 to install them. I mean - if the engine is out and on the stand. It makes no sense to go out of your way poking around the heads while still installed on the block.

The M62... dear jesus. I love em, but. Always wrenching on them. And yes - the job of JUST timing chain guides/rails could be a bit more involved on those. But keep in mind: you got the VANOS stuff to deal with. You need the flywheel lock, cam locks, etc. While it is broke down - you likely want the VANOS rebuild kit - along with the special VANOS press, etc. And the price of the timing set alone for those is still kind of high to be honest. The M112 and M113 are much more simple engines to deal with.

Most people have never seen a cam/sprocket set that has no splines or keyway. Get the torque spec or alignment just the least bit wrong with those motors (especially the cam!) and it can be a bad day. Plus the electronic thermostats, water-cooled alternators, valley pan, etc. Certainly a lot more to breaking a M62 down.

And don't get me going on the N62. Double VANOS with Valvetronic? Again, I love em... but easy money pits.

I promise to get some pics of the current ML320 I am re-doing up this evening once I get home from the office.

-Dean
 

·
Registered
87 190d 2.5TD, 98 ML320, 09 CLS550
Joined
·
129 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Some quick pics...

Here is my current W163 refresh. Was getting late when I took these photos, so sorry for the poor lighting. As you can see, I am stuck doing this one out in the yard.
Tire Wheel Car Vehicle Automotive tire


Here is the motor. Got it completely tore down. Need to clean it up a little...
Car Wheel Tire Vehicle Land vehicle


Oil pans, timing cover, motor mounts.. Got the lower pan and timing cover clean. Still got to clean up the mounts and upper pan.
Wood Gas Font Soil Composite material


THIS will be the next one to get the overhaul. Acquired this one for $240. Woman did not want to put any more money into it. She asked me what I would pay - I told her "scrap value?" she then asked how much. I took the official curb weight and multiplied it by the local pull-a-part yards price-per-pound and it came out to $238. Handed her the cash, and got a clear title. Actually drove it all the way across Aurora and to my brothers house. Ordered a conductor plate, new connector w/ o-ring and 2 gallons of Valvoline MaxLife. After that, I drove this ML just over 100 miles to where I live - where it is parked now. Runs like a top. Needed a few interior pieces, 2 lock actuators, and still needs a window switch module. Nothing that costly.
Tire Wheel Sky Car Automotive tail & brake light


Sitting under the tarp and to the left is ONE of my 1987 190D's. Stripped down to the bare hull. Soon I will buying something with a garage. The current housing market was just too insane lately for me to even consider a purchase. Once the evictions start, and the free monopoly money stops flowing... house prices will really start to settle - and I will buy.

Yeah.. I buy homes the same way I buy my cars. :)
 

·
Registered
01 ML55
Joined
·
390 Posts
Yeah.. restoring it for the second time. Only this time - a comprehensive restoration. Down. To. The. Bare. Chassis.

See the thread here:

1987 190D 2.5 Turbo (factory). Got 2 of em, actually. Entire story is in the thread.

Between the pandemic and the house I was renting getting sold... that project has been on hold until I get my garage space back.



Yes, it can be done but... the heads are easy to pull and new gaskets+bolts are cheap. The main reason I personally pull the heads while engine is out: valve stem seals and ability to do a deep clean on all the carbon. Both of these CAN also be done with heads still installed but... why? 10 minutes to remove heads... another 15-20 to install them. I mean - if the engine is out and on the stand. It makes no sense to go out of your way poking around the heads while still installed on the block.

The M62... dear jesus. I love em, but. Always wrenching on them. And yes - the job of JUST timing chain guides/rails could be a bit more involved on those. But keep in mind: you got the VANOS stuff to deal with. You need the flywheel lock, cam locks, etc. While it is broke down - you likely want the VANOS rebuild kit - along with the special VANOS press, etc. And the price of the timing set alone for those is still kind of high to be honest. The M112 and M113 are much more simple engines to deal with.

Most people have never seen a cam/sprocket set that has no splines or keyway. Get the torque spec or alignment just the least bit wrong with those motors (especially the cam!) and it can be a bad day. Plus the electronic thermostats, water-cooled alternators, valley pan, etc. Certainly a lot more to breaking a M62 down.

And don't get me going on the N62. Double VANOS with Valvetronic? Again, I love em... but easy money pits.

I promise to get some pics of the current ML320 I am re-doing up this evening once I get home from the office.

-Dean

You are correct! Cleaning everything up while in there is a great sense of satisfaction and might as well. Glad you're taking that route. I'm rebuilding an E38 at the moment and most of my time has been spent cleaning years of oil leaks!! BMW's that don't leak oil don't exist...like you said, money pits :)
 

·
Registered
01 ML55
Joined
·
390 Posts
I will happily double your investment on the ML500!!!
 

·
Registered
87 190d 2.5TD, 98 ML320, 09 CLS550
Joined
·
129 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Here is a shot of the timing chain guides...

Hood Motor vehicle Boats and boating--Equipment and supplies Wood Bumper


Notice 2 of the 4 are already cracked?

This is pretty typical of these engines. I would be very surprised to see a 200k+ engine w/ 20+ years that does not have at least one guide rail starting to fracture/crack.

For us BMW guys... this is almost normal maintenance. lol..

Honestly, there is no need to purchase the entire "timing chain kit".

The double-row chain itself is very robust and (under normal conditions) should last the lifespan of the engine.

Likewise, the hydraulic tensioners rarely give any issue and will normally last the lifespan of the engine.

These plastic guides are the only parts that pose an issue after age and mileage. When you do this refresh, get on fleabay and order the guides individually. Much cheaper than trying to find a "set" or "kit". If you scrape around, you can usually get all 4 rails for under $65.
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top