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E320 4Matic My wife's Arbonne car
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27 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I ran the auto diagnostics and got this

Sensor Data
15
09
32
32
12
36
00
11

Error Codes
b1231
b1234
b1235
b1459

Prior to running the diagnostics the ac blows hot air. I tried to clean the duo-valve but was unsuccessful at getting it fully apart. I was doing it from memory and I dont think I removed/cleaned enough. I am hoping like a lot of people, I just need a recharge and duo-valve cleaning.

thanks
Bob
 

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1996 210.020
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3,972 Posts
00 on #7 probably indicates a leak. Furthermore, it is likely that air has entered the system, which also means moisture. The first thing to do is find the leak. That will require some refrigerant in the system for a sniffer to be useful. It's not legal to add it and then dump it though, unless it is a non-refrigerant mixture like 4oz R22 plus nitrogen for the pressure.

If it's not obvious, I would not recommend adding refrigerant to the system and running it. If you do, you will likely have expensive problems down the road.
 

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E320 4Matic My wife's Arbonne car
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27 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I did some more searching and reading since my first post, I think I have come to the same conclusion.

When I did partially disassemble the duo valve there was some fluid leakage though. I never made it down the plunger level. I could not get the metal plate that goes between the top and bottom halves, to come loose.

Is there a non-R134 can of stuff to charge with, for finding leaks, at the part store? The R22 you referred to, is that common at the part store?

Does the fact that I have (1234, 1231, 1235) sun, emmissions and ect sensor error codes mean I will also be replacing those? I am not sure what to make of the interface connection error (1459).
 

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If you clear those codes after fixing the leak, they will probably not return. For some reason, they seem to pop up now and then.

R22 is indeed available, but I've only seen it in 30# cylinders, and you need a license to buy it. Nitrogen is available at welding supply places and is cheap, but you need a cylinder and regulator for it, which makes it not cheap any more.

People do use 134a to find leaks, but of course it's not recommended and not legal. That is, don't tell us that this is how you found the leak if it is indeed true. While you're very unlikely to have problems with the EPA, if you do, the fines are quite steep ($25,000 per day). They're targeted mainly at service shops, of course.

But here's another thought. If you're going to flush the system, you can use about anything to pressurize the system and check it with soapy water (or even listening to the rush, if the leak's big enough). Air comes to mind. Don't exceed 150 psi.

Testing with air is usually not done due to moisture content. Water hurts the oil. But you may already have moisture in there, and might want to flush all of the old oil out anyway. I would do it.
 
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