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1996 SL500, 2000 E430
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3,780 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I’m going to change the front brake pads on the E430 in the next day or two. Looks fairly straightforward.

A few days ago when looking under the car I noticed something that was nice on the cross frame that my R129 lacks.

A little rubber block in the middle of the cross frame just for a floorjack.

I had to go under the R129 a couple of days ago and it’s always a comedy.

The ramps slide around the garage floor which seems a pretty common problem.

I end up jacking up each side in the front by the rubber lift pads on the side and then putting each ramp under the wheel

you cannot really see the crossmember on that car (R129) without taking the plastic panel off the bottom.

Of course lifting it any place in front other than the front crossmember or the side rubber lift points is asking for a lot of bad trouble

in the back of course the differential is the only place you can lift it. I don’t really like it because I’m sure it puts a lot of stress on the differential mounts but it is what it is

I wish I had one of those portable lifts but my garage is really a one and a half size

anyway seeing the rubber block on the crossmember was a nice little surprise
 

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E320/E250 Bluetec Ford F350 6.7l
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36,720 Posts
It is plastc, not rubber.
Put plywood under the ramps so your car wheels stays on it before hitting the ramp. Also try to not use main brakes as that will push the ramps. Parking brake should do the job.
That said, my $2000 lift has its own casters, so I can move it around.
 

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1996 SL500, 2000 E430
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3,780 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
It is plastc, not rubber.
Put plywood under the ramps so your car wheels stays on it before hitting the ramp. Also try to not use main brakes as that will push the ramps. Parking brake should do the job.
That said, my $2000 lift has its own casters, so I can move it around.
Thanks, I'll give it a try. The interesting I read on this - it seems to be a widespread problem - is that FWD cars don't seem to have this problem.
 

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E320/E250 Bluetec Ford F350 6.7l
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36,720 Posts
Neither have 4M.
Front drive is "grabbing" the ramp with front wheels, while RWD will push it.
The situation reverses when you want rear lifted.
 

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Outstanding Contributor , SDS Guru
1998 MB E300TD, 1997 MB E36 AMG, 2001 MB E55 AMG
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3,972 Posts
Grab one of those scissor jacks. I've been eyeing a few of them, they are small and portable enough and you don't need to fiddle around with jacking points and all, just drive over the ramp and the scissor jack will lift it up.

1585966437526.png

This is one of the more expensive one, but the idea is same.
 

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1998 E320s sedan and wagon
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1,040 Posts
Does the 129 suspension have enough travel to get one wheel on a ramp lifting at the jack point without stressing the frame? Might it be better to lift the control arm?

My ramps have rubber feet. A layer of rubber (tool box liner? yoga mat?) between the ramps and your slick floor might keep them from sliding.

Sixto
98 E320 wagon 197K miles
 

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E320/E250 Bluetec Ford F350 6.7l
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36,720 Posts
Grab one of those scissor jacks. I've been eyeing a few of them, they are small and portable enough and you don't need to fiddle around with jacking points and all, just drive over the ramp and the scissor jack will lift it up.

View attachment 2626591

This is one of the more expensive one, but the idea is same.
That one is tall and expensive, not to mention safety.
I have seen same concept on lifts that go like 2 feet off the ground. Much safer and easier for DIY, although they were not cheap neither.
 
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