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Decided to bleed the brakes on the 87 560SL and swap out the brake fluid with ATE Super Blue. (Good stuff and makes brake bleeding easy - just watch for the color change). Also, decided to install Speed Bleeders on car so that the next time, bleeding will be easier.<br> <br> First thing is to open up hood and unscrew brake fluid reservoir. Using a syringe with silicone tube attached to end, suck up all the brake fluid out of the reservoir. Clean off the brake fluid filter as well. Once all or most of the fluid has been removed, fill with ATE Super Blue.<br> <br> Jack up the rear and remove one tire at a time. In case you didn't know, the wheel bolt takes a 17mm socket to remove.<br> <br> Start with the rear wheels first, then move to the front wheels.<br> <br> The brake fluid bleed valve uses a 9mm socket to loosen/remove. Since I'm installing speed bleeders, we just remove them. The speed bleeders use 8mm sockets to install. Once on and tightened, loosen the speed bleeder 1/4 turn and attach a silicone tube to it. Pump the brakes about three times, then check to see the brake fluid change color to blue (which means the fluid has made it through the system and out the rear caliper). Once the blue fluid gets through, tighten the bleeder valve. Carefully remove tubing and move onto the next wheel.<br> <br> Bleeding the first caliper takes the longest since you've got the push through all the old brake fluid. Therefore, I highly suggest starting with the rear driver side wheel first. Everything is right there and you can watch the color change as you pump the brakes.<br> <br> The Speed Bleeder valves makes bleeding the brake lines very easy and no need to mess with those vacuum sucking devices.<br> <br> Also, I recommend ATE Super Blue and ATE TYP 200 for changing brake fluid. It's much easier to watch for color change then to keep pumping for some unknown amount of time. ATE Super Blue is blue (of course) and ATE TYP 200 (same exact stuff as Super Blue) is amber in color. Alternating between the two makes changing a snap (if some of you haven't already figured it out).<br> <br> Also, I noticed that on the front brakes, there are two bleed valves. One on the inside portion of the caliper and another on the outside portion of the caliper. I went ahead and replace the inside valve.<br> <br> <br> <br> <br> <br> <br> <br> <br> <br> <br>
 

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One More Thing!

<br> Also, when you remove your wheels. If you find them difficult to remove AFTER you've removed your wheel bolts, it probably means you need to grease your center hub. What happens is the wheel rests it's weight on the hub. Over time, it may rust - sort of bonding the wheel and the hub together. It takes some force to remove them depending on how bonded they are.<br> <br> So, after you've exerted a lot of force to get the wheel off, apply some grease to the wheel hub so it doesn't happen in the future.<br> <br> As you can guess, this is what happened to me on one of my front wheels...<br> <br>
 
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