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2014 G550, 2000 SL500, 1995 E320 Cabriolet, 1980 TR8
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At one time I was an engineer in the alternative energy business where I learned that you need to look at the the totally energy cycle when swapping this for that. Many times an alternative consumes more energy to manufacture and install than it will ever produce/save. What you can end up doing is swapping (inefficiently) one form of energy for another. Indeed, the only for-sure way to "conserve" with energy is to never expend it in the first place.

I have several issues with EVs as they exist today.

1. Remote tail pipe - Most of our electricity supply still comes from fossil fuels so an EV merely relocates the tail pipe to a fossil fuel bburning power plant somewhere. Nuclear may seem like an option, but the waste issue has not really been solved yet. Alternatives like wind and solar may help, but again one needs to look at the total energy cycles for these sources.

2. Plant capacity factor - our current (no pun intended) electrical distribution system could not handle a major conversion to EVs. The only way that might work is to recharge only a night when industrial demand is low (not very practical).

3. As has been mentioned, recharge time needs to be dramatically shorter to be practical as a total replacement for liquid/gas fuel powered cars.

4. The environmental impact of the manufacture of EV components (mostly batteries, but motors too) is still something that I think needs to be studied. These "clean" cars may be a lot dirtier on the back end than our current vehicles are up front.

5. Total energy cycle - I'm not sure if anyone has really looked into this, but an EV may not be the energy savior it is touted as being.

That being said, a Tesla is faster than snot and a blast to drive, but 'm just not sure things are fully baked yet.

Just my 2¢ worth . . .
 

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An electric car is just a giant iphone with 4 wheels. Do you guys expect to charge your phone in 2 minutes?
Tesla tried to switch them out in orders of minutes in their stations but I'm not sure how well received that effort is going.

Latest Tesla vehicle has 400 mile range. Not very many people drive longer than 400 miles a day. That issue would be put to rest when they reach 500 mile range.

My issue with electric vehicles has to do more with e-waste and cost. Hopefully, manufacturers have figured out a way to recycle batteries with <10yrs life.
All solvable problems and we are at an inflection point on all this.

There is a nuclear plant out there in the sky that is sending us 1KW / square meter of energy 10 hours a day. And an Electric car is a perfect way to harness and store that power.

For full disclosure, I do not have an electric car (yet). I have two gasoline, 1 diesel, 1 hybrid in the household.
They all serve the purpose they are intended for when they were built.

Converting a W124 to all electric would be a fun project but it would be a ton of work. Hybrid is probably a waste of an effort as PN187 mentioned.

My 2 cents worth ....
Hear Hear! My iPhone has a spare battery that charges the iPhone from near zero to 100% in less than an hour. It will provide two of those "zero to hero" charges before its depleted. There is no doubt in my mind that as the heel draggers continue to delay adoption of electric vehicles, the problems (as they see it) will mostly if not all be worked out. I'm sure the most popular argument when horses were being replaced by cars, was "where the heck is everyone going to buy gas????" Its not rocket science; its just different.
 

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1990 Benz 300E 2.6 (mine) ; 1994 E320 Wagon (wife's) ; 1993 300CE Cabrio, needs some TLC
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now just scale that battery up about 10000 to 1 to power a car. I think the Tesla's batteries are 90,000 watt*hours. your iphone battery is like 9 watt*hours.
 

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I'm not thinking to convert it to fully electric car
I think we can just add an electric motor and battery and get the engine to charge the battery
Hopefully your motivation for this project is curiosity because the money saved offsetting fuel costs will never be recouped if you ever do see this to completion. Even comparing a Prius and a Corolla it takes a long time unless the miles driven is far more than average, and Toyota knows very well wtf they're doing. The Prius is designed ground up to be a hybrid by nearly the largest automaker in the world. Those motors are a hell of a lot more efficient than anything offered in a W124, and the start/stop technology is a huge contributor to the increased fuel economy.
 

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1990 Benz 300E 2.6 (mine) ; 1994 E320 Wagon (wife's) ; 1993 300CE Cabrio, needs some TLC
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Cracked me up the other day when someone in a local forum was complaining their Prius lost its OBD memory and needed to be snogged. Smog folks said they had to drive it about 500 miles at random speeds to reload the monitors.... Kid was complaining he barely drove 500 miles a year. Wtf did he have a Prius for???
 

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'95 E300 DIESEL, '91 600SEL, '92 600SEL
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Don't get me wrong. It's not that I'm deadset against hybrid or full electric technology, it's just that the choice of vehicles leaves a lot to be desired and these "eco friendly" vehicles require a lot more of the planet's resources than a standard car. The only hybrid vehicle that tickles my feathers is the Porsche 918 since it runs cleaner than a Prius and still has a decent V8.

Indifferent about Tesla, and does absolutely zero for me. Way overhyped IMO, and build quality leaves a lot to be desired for the price tag they're asking. It's a closed end to end eco system like Apple, so DIY is out of the question and you're at the mercy of the manufacturer. And if Tesla puts your car on their blacklist, you're F'd until eternity.

But the rest of the players are basically repurposed washers & dryers.

And the biggest issue with electric cars is the painpoint of the battery. It is far less efficient in colder climates, and the replacement price renders the cars instantly "economically not repairable". So much for being eco friendly.

Also, there is a very finite amount of lithium that can be mined from the earth and comes at a very high and dirty price while the world has a glut of iron ore and lead.

And lastly, IF we were really want to start talking about zero CO2 footprints nuclear power generation is the one choice that must be left on the table. There is nothing else that works as efficiently in as little a footprint as nuclear. And if Bill Gates's foundation cracks the waste issue then the US by itself has enough energy for at least 750 years just by reusing the existing stockpiles of spent nuclear fuel.
 

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EV batteries have an 8yr/100k warranty, which exceeds the average length of new car ownership. When the battery fails cost to replace is not cheap, but Prii have shown us that you don't always have to replace the entire pack. Individual cells that test bad can be replaced. I don't have the experience to know how long you can expect the other cells to last when you do this type of repair. I suppose kick the can down the road until capacity drops below whatever percent is acceptable. Naturally a DIYer won't have to consider labor costs when that happens and is more of a concern for someone who would have to pay to have it done. Either way, over the life of the vehicle this is offset by far less required maintenance than an ICE car.

As since everyone seems to care about the 'big picture' when it comes to the environmental impact of EVs, same dude did an analysis on the subject.

 

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Well, that conversation starter sure got some conversation started.

Realistically, you might be able to swap in a 2008ish Toyota Camry hybrid powertrain as a front wheel drive solution, maybe with some 4MATIC parts. The battery is nickel metal hydride, so it doesn't need liquid cooling, is relatively cheap to buy used, and fits behind the rear passenger seat of the Toyota. Cabling and controllers might fit in the now empty drive shaft tunnel. The engine is a relatively standard Camry 4 cylinder inline that is more powerful on paper than the single cam 300E engine, and it's definitely cleaner on emissions than a Mercedes engine from the 80s or early 90s.

Bonus green points if you find a wrecked Camry donor car or two to swap from, right?
 

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Buying a 10+ year old hybrid anything is guaranteed to be a bottomless moneypit, even if the donor parts are Toyota based. Example, the starter/generator and the battery pack and on four wheel drive hybrids such as the Toyota Rav4 the electronic and hydraulic limited rear end diffs. The replacement costs for those 3 parts alone easily totals into the 5 digit territory.
 

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Discussion Starter #32
Many thanks to everyone who participated with us in this matter, whether by technical opinion, clarification, or even objection or disbelief in the possibility of this project. The purpose of the project is beneficial to all and may be sowing it for one of the creators to work on it and actually implement it because science has proven that there is no impossible word
 

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1990 Benz 300E 2.6 (mine) ; 1994 E320 Wagon (wife's) ; 1993 300CE Cabrio, needs some TLC
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Well, that conversation starter sure got some conversation started.

Realistically, you might be able to swap in a 2008ish Toyota Camry hybrid powertrain as a front wheel drive solution, maybe with some 4MATIC parts. The battery is nickel metal hydride, so it doesn't need liquid cooling, is relatively cheap to buy used, and fits behind the rear passenger seat of the Toyota. Cabling and controllers might fit in the now empty drive shaft tunnel. The engine is a relatively standard Camry 4 cylinder inline that is more powerful on paper than the single cam 300E engine, and it's definitely cleaner on emissions than a Mercedes engine from the 80s or early 90s.

Bonus green points if you find a wrecked Camry donor car or two to swap from, right?
indeed, you'd need the front suspension bits from a 4Matic as the drive axles would otherwise go right through the spring. and you'd need some way to mate the Toyota half-shafts to the 4matic front hubs.

you'd need to do some major engineering and fabrication on the front subframe of the Mercedes to adopt the transverse FWD engine+transaxle+hybrid package to a chassis that was designed for a longitudinal I6 RWD.

you'd then need to integrate the air conditioning, heater controls, and dashboard instrumentation to a completely alien system.

now you have a car that weighs around 1000 lbs more than the Camry with the same FWD power plant.
 

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I am a new member in this wonderful forum and a fan of Mercedes cars and I own W124 + W201 and I was thinking why do we share technical expertise from members who have engineering skills in the project of adding an electric motor and batteries to Mercedes cars to become hybrid like modern cars so that we do not give up our current cars that we love Actually we keep pace with the development and economy in gasoline expenses & Slow car advancement
Anyone have tried this idea, let us share our opinion and how it is possible
Which engine does it have . If its small then plug in otherwise a mild hybrid is more feasible . If u can spend m9ney and put in work and make some sacrifices like rear luggage space and shit then do it with a big engine that woukd be dope . If fuel economy is your concern then mild hybrid with a small turbo upgrade and some tweaks will improve fuel economy
 

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Pull out the M103/104 boat anchor and install one of the 5 cyl diesels from the W123. They will run all day charging the batteries, running power steering, A/C and providing heat.
 
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