Mercedes-Benz Forum banner

1 - 3 of 3 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
0 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Just wasted 30 minutes this Sunday morning watching an infomercial for Zmax. Several endorsements (Shelby and Foyt to name a few) and the product seems to be successful.<br> <br> Has anyone added these three additives to their Mercedes? What's the result? Can a product really eat away all the carbon, seep into the metal and clean it out, and increase the life of your engine? The system includes one for engine, gas, and transmission.<br> <br> I have an '88 560SL with about 130,000 miles on it. It runs well, but could be better. What do you think?<br> <br> All responses appreciated!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
0 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
Is "ZMAX" z answer?

I wouldn't use it on a newer car but maybe it can help the high mileage vehicles. I personally wouldn't use it.<br> <br> My neighbor got the Z-max and he gave me the small engine formula. I can say that it seemed to help my lawnmower start easier. He didn't think it did anything for his truck he used it on though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
0 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Re: Just Say No to Oil Additives

The Federal Trade Commission's (FTC) recent lawsuit against zMax auto additives, seeking to halt false and misleading advertising and gain refunds for customers who purchased the products. According to the FTC, the enhanced performance benefits zMax claims its products provide are totally unsubstantiated, and in the same tests cited to support performance claims, motor oil treated with zMax actually produced more than twice as much bearing corrosion than motor oil by itself. They further allege that the three different zMax products- an engine additive, a fuel line additive and a transmission additive- are nothing more than tinted mineral oil.<br> The complaint states that since at least May of 1999, zMax has aired infomercials promoting its 'Power System', a $39 package of three additives to be used in the engine, fuel line and transmission of automobiles. The infomercials are quite convincing, even going as far as featuring testimonials from various consumers and race car drivers making such claims as, 'I was averaging about 22 miles to the gallon on the highway. I installed the zMax and so I jumped right up to about 28 miles per gallon' and 'zMax guarantees a minimum of 10% gas mileage increase.' Other advertising claims 'zMax with LinKite has the scientific, CRC L38 proof it takes you car to the Max!' and 'Why zMax Works- Cuts carbon build-up on valve stems 66%; Lowers wear on valve stems 66%; Lowers wear on piston skirts 60%; Reduces blow-by leakage 17.7%; Increases combustion efficiency 9.25%; Lowers fuel consumption 8.5%- results of an independent CRC L38 test.'<br> The CRC L38 test is a standard auto industry test which measures the bearing corrosion protection properties of motor oils. According to the complaint, in early 1997 an independent testing facility performed two CRC L38 tests of the zMaz products. The results showed motor oil treated with zMax additives produced more than double the bearing corrosion as motor oil alone. According to the FTC, the defendants eliminated the bearing corrosion results, as well as all other negative results, to produce one 'report' from the two sets of tests, using this 'report' in its infomercials and on its website.<br>
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
Top