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CH4S Admin , Outstanding Contributor
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Iranian cleric denounces dog owners
BBC, Monday, 14 October, 2002, 11:57 GMT 12:57 UK


Hardline conservatives are still influential in Iran

A conservative Iranian cleric has denounced the "moral depravity" of owning a dog, and called for the arrest of all dogs and their owners.
Dogs are considered unclean in Islamic law and the spread of dog ownership in Westernised secular circles in Iran is frowned upon by the religious establishment.

"I demand the judiciary arrest all dogs with long, medium or short legs - together with their long-legged owners," Hojatolislam Hassani is quoted as saying in the reformist Etemad newspaper.

"Otherwise I'll do it myself," said the outspoken cleric, who leads Friday prayers in the north-western city of Urumiyeh.

"In our country there is freedom of speech, but not freedom for corruption," he said.

Canine clampdown

Tehran journalist Mafiseh Kouhnavand told the BBC that the subject of dog ownership had been brought up many times before.

Hardline judiciary agents and police occasionally clamp down on the practice, fining owners and confiscating their pets from streets and parks.


Short-legged dogs were the target of a previous campaign

In June, police banned the sale of dogs and penalised anyone walking a dog in public. The practice is seen by conservatives as a corrupting influence of decadent Western culture.

But despite the clampdowns, dog ownership has been on the rise, especially among rich Iranians in the north of Tehran.

"Now it has reached Urumiyeh, but some people were not ready for it," Ms Kouhnavand said.

Hojatolislam Hassani appears to be widening the scope of his anti-canine campaign.

Last year, he publicly thanked police for their policy of exclusively confiscating short-legged dogs in Urumiyeh.



See also:


18 Aug 01 | Middle East
Iran police plan moral crusade

08 Dec 99 | Middle East
Iran buys 'unclean' sniffer dogs
 

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Always Remembered RIP
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Someone is clearly barking up the wrong tree.
 

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I hike my leg in their general direction.
 

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Surely A Large Human
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I'm glad to read this.

The "judiciary" can start with this crazy motherfucker here.



AKI - Adnkronos international Iran: President's dogs upset religious leaders

Tehran, 5 Feb.(AKI) – A decision by Iranian president Mahmoud Ahmadinejad to acquire four guard dogs has upset the ayatollahs from the holy city of Qom.

The four dogs, bought in Germany at a cost of 110,000 euros each, are the topic of theological controversy because Islam considers dogs to be impure.

For this reason, the government has banned owners of domestic animals from taking them on the streets of the city, and owners risk penalties or the 'detention' of their animals in a pound.

Now that Ahmadinejad is protecting German dogs, many are asking the question: why can he have dogs while other citizens are banned?

The move has been badly received by several high-ranking ayatollahs.

In the middle of the controversy, the Fars agency considered the unofficial spokesman for Ahmadinejad, gave wide coverage to the issue related to the president's dogs.

"First of all these dogs are only of a German breed, bought as puppies, but grown and trained in Iran in the hands of Iranian instructors," Fars said.

"The purchase of these dogs was authorised by a fatwa issued by several ayatollahs who approved the use of these animals if the only goal was to guarantee personal security and not infringe on any religious rule."

It's a judgement not shared by other religious leaders, for example, those that issued a fatwa authorising police to fine whoever is seen on the street with a puppy.​
 

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CH4S Admin , Outstanding Contributor
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When I lived in Tehran, I would walk my Irish setter to an International News stand every morning. I remember a number of occasions when construction site workers etc. would throw small stones at the dog.
I could never identify the thrower(s) though.
An Iranian law prohibiting dog ownership is funny, the Saluki, thought to be the oldest known breed of dog (3,000BC), originated in the region. The second oldest breed is the Afghan hound.
 

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Good for him.
Bloody short legged dogs are an affront to the benificient creator of everything that exists...
which the mighty one smiles upon and provides for, praised be him...
excepting short legged dogs and their long and medium legged cousins.
 

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When I lived in Tehran, I would walk my Irish setter to an International News stand every morning. I remember a number of occasions when construction site workers etc. would throw small stones at the dog.
I could never identify the thrower(s) though.
An Iranian law prohibiting dog ownership is funny, the Saluki, thought to be the oldest known breed of dog (3,000BC), originated in the region. The second oldest breed is the Afghan hound.
You mean Sloughi?
 

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CH4S Admin , Outstanding Contributor
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Some of Iran's nomadic tribes use the Saluki to hunt by horse. The dog will be with the hunter on a horse that is in full galopp, jump off to hit the ground running, and then really take off.
It's one of the most amazing things I have ever seen.
 

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Good for him.
Bloody short legged dogs are an affront to the benificient creator of everything that exists...
which the mighty one smiles upon and provides for, praised be him...
excepting short legged dogs and their long and medium legged cousins.
Brilliant!
 

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Making a Home for Charlie, Away From Baghdad's Slums
By Karin Brulliard
Washington Post Staff Writer
Friday, February 15, 2008; B01

He hesitated just a bit as he rounded a corner inside Dulles International Airport yesterday and spotted the flock of television cameras and cooing journalists awaiting him. Then, with posture erect like a soldier's, he trotted straight toward the action -- he was used to bomb blasts and gunfire, after all, so this was nothing.

Post-escape from Baghdad and fresh off a 13-hour flight from Kuwait, Charlie the border collie mix actually seemed to be smiling for the crowd.

Five months after the SPCA International received a plea from American soldiers hoping to transfer their beloved Iraqi stray to U.S. terrain, the 9-month-old mutt became the first beneficiary of the animal advocacy organization's effort to rescue pets from the war zones where they provide solace to service members. Charlie eventually will live in Phoenix with one of his caretaker soldiers.

It being Valentine's Day, the SPCA dished out the emotional hyperbole. Charlie's bond with his caretakers, the organization said, "is the ultimate love story between a man and his dog." The soldiers, too, were effusive.

"We can't wait for him to get his first taste of the good old USA," one wrote in an e-mail to the SPCA. "We especially can't wait until we can see him again."

Parts of Charlie's back story were obscured to protect those he left behind. In his case, they were U.S. soldiers based at a Baghdad outpost -- the SPCA identified the unit only as Charlie Company -- who were barred by military rules from keeping pets. But when the soldiers came upon a flea-infested and starving puppy while on patrol, they could not resist sharing their affection and their ready-to-eat meals.

One soldier, identified by the organization as "Sgt. Watson," sent e-mails to animal rescue groups. The SPCA took up the case, and Operation Baghdad Pups was born.

But first, program manager Terri Crisp interviewed Watson in Phoenix when he was on leave in October. Watson wanted to adopt Charlie at the end of his tour in March.

"He was a soldier and tough, and toward the end, I said, 'Why are we bringing Charlie home?' And he said, 'Because I made a promise' " not to abandon the dog, Crisp said yesterday, her voice choked with tears.

Eleven other dogs and two cats adopted by service members in Iraq or Afghanistan are in the pipeline for rescue, said Stephanie Scroggs, a spokeswoman for SPCA International. The SPCA will pay about $4,000 per rescue, Scroggs said. She acknowledged that the sum could aid many more stateside animals but said the program also supports the troops.

"It's too much to ask them to leave, go to Iraq and then to desert their companion animals," Scroggs said.

To prime Charlie for departure, rabies and distemper vaccines were shipped to Baghdad, where a veterinarian at the Ministry of Agriculture was prepared to administer them. Although the soldiers lived near the ministry, Crisp said, they needed to generate a "mission" to justify the visit because they are not allowed to have pets.

After a 30-day quarantine, a cloak-and-dagger turnover was arranged so Charlie would not come to the attention of the soldiers' senior officers. This week, a quartet of U.S. security contractors picked up Charlie at his outpost and took him to Baghdad International Airport. Crisp, meanwhile, flew United Airlines to Kuwait, then Gryphon Airlines to Baghdad. When her plane touched down, the contractors carried Charlie in his crate across the tarmac, and he was soon on his way to the United States.

Once at Dulles, Crisp said, she e-mailed the Charlie Company, "to let the company know that Charlie has put paws on American soil." Soon Charlie was striding with Crisp into the baggage claim area, his still-dingy white tail curved like a plume over the camouflage cape that draped his back.

There to welcome him was former Navy reservist Mark Feffer, accompanied by Cinnamon, a refugee dog Feffer brought home from Afghanistan in 2006. Cinnamon got lost in transit for six weeks, prompting Feffer to launch a rescue mission that his sister, Christine Sullivan, chronicled in a book titled "44 Days Out of Kandahar."

"They give so much support to the guys that are over there," Feffer, who lives in Annapolis, said of war-zone pets.

As the humans spoke, Charlie, perhaps feeling amorous on Valentine's Day, eagerly edged toward Cinnamon. Regal and aloof, Cinnamon leaned toward a row of soft seats, where she later fell asleep.

Charlie, too, quickly sprawled in slumber on the shiny linoleum.

"Jet lag," Crisp pronounced.

Much lay ahead: A dog spa appointment to wash away desert dust. A night at a hotel. In coming days, a vet checkup, a flight to Los Angeles and a drive to Phoenix, where he will be cared for until Watson returns from Iraq.

But first, Charlie was scheduled to stroll around the Mall.

"It's probably going to be a real shock for him to see such beauty and great monuments," Watson wrote in an e-mail to Scroggs yesterday at 2:14 a.m., "after knowing nothing but the slums of Baghdad."
 

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What if the saluki had 3 normal legs and one stunted or missing? Does that go to some heavenly semi-unclean room with no virgin slut doggies, a pet purgatory, if you will?

B
 

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"An important factor, not to be overlooked, is the leg length to body size ratio of the creatures. Some dog's, such as the Mullah's 'Fi Fi', have relatively long legs when compared to their tiny cute little bodies, and therefore, shall be the last dogs to be eliminated under the 14 year plan to rid the earth these creators so offensive to the sight of the creator."
 

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It Is What It Is, Dude
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This week, a quartet of U.S. security contractors picked up Charlie at his outpost and took him to Baghdad International Airport.
And how much of our tax monies will the Pentagon over pay Blackwater for that little excursion?
 

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Every picnic has a rain cloud hunting it down.
 
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