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1983 380SL, ivory/dk brown, 46k miles, dual roller timing chain. 1986 560SL, red/white, 190K mile.
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9,088 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
... it was a better price than Bosch, and I felt that URO has not been given a fair evaluation by some folks here in the past.
In addition, I've used other URO parts with success too - some rubber trim pieces, and their Steering Coupler.

I have been having difficulty starting my 1986 560SL after driving it a while, turning the engine off, and then several minutes later doing a hot restart. I purchased my URO accumulator on Ebay for about one half the price of the Bosch accumulator. Nothing wrong with Bosch, its a good part too. I've noted that URO does price their offerings at a much more reasonable price so instead of just writing off everything URO, that we should give the company a fair evaluation. Initial evaluation is very positive and seems to be the fix for the issue I have.

The URO Accumulator came well packaged, felt high quality, and fitted perfectly. An easy installation.

Yellow Font Material property Ticket Electric blue


Wheel Gas Circle Auto part Wood


Auto part Nickel Metal Household hardware Cylinder


Automotive fuel system Motor vehicle Gas Engineering Auto part


Not having a car lift, I backed my 560SL up on Ramps:
Tire Wheel Vehicle Car Hood


Used a 10mm socket, extension, and 1/4" ratchet to remove the plastic cover.
There are three 10mm screws to be removed in order to get that plastic cover off.
One of the three screws you will need a 12" extension on your ratchet and insert it through the preformed hole in the cover.

I used a Harbor Freight Hose Clamp to pinch closed the fuel line from the gas tank.

Then an 8mm wrench and phillips screwdriver to loosen the band around the old Accumulator.
You won't be able to see the 8mm nut on the other end so it will be by feel.
Then a phillips screwdriver to loosen the hose clamp on one end of the Accumulator.
Before pulling off that rubber hose, have ready a stubby phillips screwdriver to plug the hose to minimize fuel spill.
Wear some old clothes as working underneath on a creeper you are going to get some gasoline spilled on you.

Then a 14mm and a 12mm wrench to disconnect the hard line and slightly bend away.
I used a "stubby" 14mm wrench because it was a confined space.

The old fuel accumulator should then be easy pull out and away.
Simply reinstall the URO accumulator by following the removal procedure.

Tools I used:
Azure Hand tool Office supplies Tool Gas


While I was under there, I decided to mark with Red Paint the positive ends of the two Fuel Pumps ... just in case my Fuel Pump Relay fails. I'm going to make up an "emergency breakdown" wire with clamps on both ends and store it in the trunk. If the Fuel Pump Relay fails, I can connect the wire from the battery to the fuel pump and the Red Paint would easily let me know which end to clip to the Fuel Pump.
Automotive fuel system Motor vehicle Gas Automotive tire Auto part



The old Bosch Accumulator that after 30+ years was failing to keep fuel pressure:
Hand Finger Gas Button Circle


Versus the new URO Accumulator:
Wheel Gas Circle Auto part Wood


I know some folks diss anything URO but these two Accumulators looked and felt the same quality.
 

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560SL,380SL,E350
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4,344 Posts
My 0.02, Uro's quality has gone up noticeably over the last several years. We shall see! The good news is, that for many of the parts that they sell, it doesn't cost any more to design and make a good part than it takes to design and make a bad part.

That seems to be bucking a trend, that the quality of things in general seems to be going into a decline over the last 50 years, and in particular, the last 20. Due to economics, EVERYTHING is a race to the bottom. Everyone wants quality but doesn't want to pay for it...also, I am beginning to believe that the extreme desire for "lightness" and CAFE in cars is contributing to the decline in quality.

A good example is the auto transmission. 50 years ago, the GM Turbo 400 was the best automotive automatic transmission on the planet. Simple, overengineered, and much stronger than it really needed to be in virtually all applications. It also cost 18 horsepower JUST to run the pump, never mind, what was needed to move the car (with not very good efficiency). Now, you have 10-speed transmissions with tiny parts and complexities, just strong enough to work, where it's a miracle that they ever work at all.

I've come to notice that my daily, a Hyundai Sonata, is incredibly noisy. The reason that it's so noisy is that to meet CAFE, they took the sound-deadening out of it that Sonatas in the rest of the world have!

</rant>
 

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Registered
1983 380SL, ivory/dk brown, 46k miles, dual roller timing chain. 1986 560SL, red/white, 190K mile.
Joined
·
9,088 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Very nice writeup; your car looks just like my '86, which has the same hot restart issue. How much did you pay for that URO item? Autohausaz.com is a frequent source for me, they sell those for $62.
I considered Bosch and did install a Bosch Accumulator on my 1983 380SL a few months ago.
The price Bosch commands a pricey $170 to $250 while the URO Accumulator sells for $60 to $70.
I paid $72.45, Ebay which included taxes and free shipping.

I was curious about how reliable the URO accumulator was, so I contacted URO and feel I got an honest answer that they have very few customer complaints about it, especially when they were honest that there were fitment problems with a rubber seal I was interested in. URO did not give me anything, I paid for the part. It seems to be high quality part and I expect it to be long lived.
 

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Registered
1983 380SL, ivory/dk brown, 46k miles, dual roller timing chain. 1986 560SL, red/white, 190K mile.
Joined
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9,088 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Carl.
Can you provide the date you installed this URO accumulator and the millage, so we can track the outcome......
I installed it this morning 12April2021 and did some hot restarts and it appears the problem I had is fixed.
It would be good for the Benz community to get honest feedback on parts, especially URO which is a more economical and sometimes only alternative, as Mercedes parts in general are quite expensive.
 
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Registered
83 500SL (Used, from original owner) 85 380 SE (new) 07 CLS 63 AMG (new) 18 GLC 300 (new)
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144 Posts
My general rule is to use OEM or a long time MB supplier like Bosch, Lemfoerder for safety critical items, eg the steering coupler, brake and fuel hoses. On the other hand, I did try Uro for my new fuel gauge sender—-works so far!
 

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Registered
1983 380SL, ivory/dk brown, 46k miles, dual roller timing chain. 1986 560SL, red/white, 190K mile.
Joined
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9,088 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Good stuff Carl, please let us know in the year 2051 if it performed as well as the Bosch 😁
Shoot, in 2051 I'll be 103 and I won't be interested in Mercedes, just the pretty nurses taking care of me :)
 

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1,157 Posts
... it was a better price than Bosch, and I felt that URO has not been given a fair evaluation by some folks here in the past.
In addition, I've used other URO parts with success too - some rubber trim pieces, and their Steering Coupler.

I have been having difficulty starting my 1986 560SL after driving it a while, turning the engine off, and then several minutes later doing a hot restart. I purchased my URO accumulator on Ebay for about one half the price of the Bosch accumulator. Nothing wrong with Bosch, its a good part too. I've noted that URO does price their offerings at a much more reasonable price so instead of just writing off everything URO, that we should give the company a fair evaluation. Initial evaluation is very positive and seems to be the fix for the issue I have.

The URO Accumulator came well packaged, felt high quality, and fitted perfectly. An easy installation.

View attachment 2685968

View attachment 2685969

View attachment 2685970

View attachment 2685971

Not having a car lift, I backed my 560SL up on Ramps:
View attachment 2685972

Used a 10mm socket, extension, and 1/4" ratchet to remove the plastic cover.
There are three 10mm screws to be removed in order to get that plastic cover off.
One of the three screws you will need a 12" extension on your ratchet and insert it through the preformed hole in the cover.

I used a Harbor Freight Hose Clamp to pinch closed the fuel line from the gas tank.

Then an 8mm wrench and phillips screwdriver to loosen the band around the old Accumulator.
You won't be able to see the 8mm nut on the other end so it will be by feel.
Then a phillips screwdriver to loosen the hose clamp on one end of the Accumulator.
Before pulling off that rubber hose, have ready a stubby phillips screwdriver to plug the hose to minimize fuel spill.
Wear some old clothes as working underneath on a creeper you are going to get some gasoline spilled on you.

Then a 14mm and a 12mm wrench to disconnect the hard line and slightly bend away.
I used a "stubby" 14mm wrench because it was a confined space.

The old fuel accumulator should then be easy pull out and away.
Simply reinstall the URO accumulator by following the removal procedure.

Tools I used:
View attachment 2685983

While I was under there, I decided to mark with Red Paint the positive ends of the two Fuel Pumps ... just in case my Fuel Pump Relay fails. I'm going to make up an "emergency breakdown" wire with clamps on both ends and store it in the trunk. If the Fuel Pump Relay fails, I can connect the wire from the battery to the fuel pump and the Red Paint would easily let me know which end to clip to the Fuel Pump.
View attachment 2685988


The old Bosch Accumulator that after 30+ years was failing to keep fuel pressure:
View attachment 2685984

Versus the new URO Accumulator:
View attachment 2685985

I know some folks diss anything URO but these two Accumulators looked and felt the same quality.
i did not use made in china steering coupler . dont trust them .found a way to take the original apart and replacing the 2 plastic bushings .use the one from early cars that came apart .
 

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Registered
1983 380SL, ivory/dk brown, 46k miles, dual roller timing chain. 1986 560SL, red/white, 190K mile.
Joined
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9,088 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I've used these URO rubber pieces: Soft Top rubber pieces, drivers and passenger door wrap around piece, Soft Top Compartment, and I think the rubber around Trunk Lid. Someone gave me the drivers/passenger door wrap around rubbers because they went with Mercedes rubbers, I found they fit reasonably well but never have glued them down permanently. I guess the Soft Top header rubber was one I had the most trouble with - it was just too long. I need the A-pillar rubbers but I understand the URO versions need a little tweaking - and the A-pillar rubbers I understand are a b*tch to install, need 3 hands and dealing with tiny screws.

I installed the URO soft top compartment rubber and had trouble towing away the soft top. The Soft Top tended to pull away on the rubber on both sides near the door. I measured it with my pristine OEM rubber and the OEM rubber was much narrower. So I went and replaced it with a new OEM Mercedes rubber and found it too the same as the URO rubber. Truth be known, the issue really was that I had replaced my Soft Top with a thicker canvas that made towing away the soft top a little troublesome.
 
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Registered
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I considered Bosch and did install a Bosch Accumulator on my 1983 380SL a few months ago.
The price Bosch commands a pricey $170 to $250 while the URO Accumulator sells for $60 to $70.
I paid $72.45, Ebay which included taxes and free shipping.

I was curious about how reliable the URO accumulator was, so I contacted URO and feel I got an honest answer that they have very few customer complaints about it, especially when they were honest that there were fitment problems with a rubber seal I was interested in. URO did not give me anything, I paid for the part. It seems to be high quality part and I expect it to be long lived.
the problem with made in china is not the metal part , but anything made out of rubber .so motor mounts , tie rods , ball joints and on , the ribber fall apart in 2 years .motor mounts on older cars like diesels last 6 months .
 

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Registered
1983 380SL, ivory/dk brown, 46k miles, dual roller timing chain. 1986 560SL, red/white, 190K mile.
Joined
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9,088 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
the problem with made in china is not the metal part , but anything made out of rubber .so motor mounts , tie rods , ball joints and on , the ribber fall apart in 2 years .motor mounts on older cars like diesels last 6 months .
Assuming that is true, we need to generate feedback to URO so they can tweak their product.
And we members can keep track of parts from URO and the other vendors on what works and what does not work properly.
 
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Registered
1974 450SL (US), 2005 SLK200 (UK)
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1,614 Posts
I've used these URO rubber pieces: Soft Top rubber pieces, drivers and passenger door wrap around piece, Soft Top Compartment, and I think the rubber around Trunk Lid. Someone gave me the drivers/passenger door wrap around rubbers because they went with Mercedes rubbers, I found they fit reasonably well but never have glued them down permanently. I guess the Soft Top header rubber was one I had the most trouble with - it was just too long. I need the A-pillar rubbers but I understand the URO versions need a little tweaking - and the A-pillar rubbers I understand are a b*tch to install, need 3 hands and dealing with tiny screws.

I installed the URO soft top compartment rubber and had trouble towing away the soft top. The Soft Top tended to pull away on the rubber on both sides near the door. I measured it with my pristine OEM rubber and the OEM rubber was much narrower. So I went and replaced it with a new OEM Mercedes rubber and found it too the same as the URO rubber. Truth be known, the issue really was that I had replaced my Soft Top with a thicker canvas that made towing away the soft top a little troublesome.
Many thanks Carl - that is good to know. URO rubber cost is a fraction of MB. Andy
 

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Vogon constructor fleet.
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10,472 Posts
Every time I've used URO parts, they left a bad taste. The last time I tried their stuff, I replaced the OEM engine mounts on my W210 E320 Lorinser. The car had about 150K on it. The UROs lasted until around 170K and collapsed. They're okay for hard-to-find items like trim pieces, switches, sensors and the like but avoid ANYTHING from them that has a rubber component.....especially suspension bushings.
 
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