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500 SE (1989), 304,000 km.
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659 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
How many of you have to slam shut your Benz's doors, and how did you fix the issue?

I was just wondering how many of you experience this, as I do, i.e. you first close your door, but it doesn't clunk shut, so then you give it more whammy, and then it clunks shut on the 2nd/3rd try, lol :rolleyes:. For me, it's the front passenger door (LHD), as well as driver's side, which are clunk-shut challenged :D.

Of course, my other question here, naturally, follows -- do new door seals eradicate this issue? What about the other seals, around the frame? Were they thickish seals when factory installed? Mine look thinnish now and rather chalky-coloured.

-- RS
 

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1990 Mecedes-Benz 420SEL
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1,217 Posts
Hi, RS. Look carefully at the door striker and latch to see if anything is binding. If it is, you will see scratches or worn spots. Sometimes a minor adjustment here can help. To adjust the door itself is a big job - you'd need help due to its weight. A body shop that works on these cars can fix the problem, and will have the shims to true up the door if it is sagging. I had the dealer body shop adjust mine and they now close great.

The door seals are rather thin when new, and the chalky color is normal, but inspect them carefully all the way around to be sure there are no creases or folds in them.

One last thing - make sure the door sill is seated firmly as there is very little clearance between the bottom of the door and the sill.

Regards,
Dave
 

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1965 220S, 1999 Volvo V70 (wagon), 2006 Ford Crown Vic Police Interceptor, 72 350SL 4 Speed
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1,830 Posts
Try greasing your hinges.
 

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1985 500 SEC, 2005 E320
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1,294 Posts
I have owned 6 mercedes' and haven't had to slam the door on any of em. I do, have to be firm though because the cars are fairly airtight. That's what we mean when we say the doors still "Thunk". I wouldn't really call it slamming though. if it's anything more than that, I would look into greasing, and checking to see if the door is sagging. pull up on the door when it's open, if it moves up and down, you may need hinges. this is really rare though. I personally have never had to replace even one.
 

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1990 560 sel
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70 Posts
mine did that

lubricating the latch assembly and hinges totally eliminated that prob for me. I was actually amazed that's all it took.
 

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1985 380SE
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1,293 Posts
When mine did it it was because that body colored trim/seal that runs along the b-pillar had come out from under the door sill cover.
 

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1990 560 SEL with Euro engine, 1998 SL500 Sport
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2,957 Posts
bradelee said:
lubricating the latch assembly and hinges totally eliminated that prob for me. I was actually amazed that's all it took.
I would only add to that maybe dry (PTFE) lubricant would be good as grease tends to collects dirt. I did this on my hood with great results.
 

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1986 560 sel
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38 Posts
With your door open stand at the rear of it and try lifting it up "as if your trying to lift the car" if you feel movement or hear a clunk sound near the front of the door you may need new hinges .

Oops I didn't read all of darkones post sorry
 

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300SD
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11,191 Posts
No!!!!!! Adjusting the door striker is the key here. This is a common problem with these cars. Doors tend to sag on the hinges over the years so you must compensate for this by adjusting the door striker on the center pillar for front door and on front of the rear quarter panel for the rear door.

The Bolts on the strikers can be a PITA to break loose - be patient and do no strip out the Allen head bolts. Use copious quantity of penetrating oil first. Then play around with the striker until the door closes smoothly. Greasing the hinges and the latch will do very little, if anything for you.
 

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1991 300SE
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1,435 Posts
My W126 has perfect doors! Shut with the least bit of effort. :)

However, the 190 is a different story. I had to adjust at the hinges and the striker post as well as a good amount of lubricant to get them to shut with only a little bit of force.

Just goes to show the difference in craftsmenship from the W126 to the W201.
 

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1983 Euro 500SEC AMG, 83 SEC custom convertible, 2x 84 500SEC, 02 w203coupe, euro 1985 300d
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1,579 Posts
like p100 said --there is a rubber piece in the door check that usually falls apart with age, replace it they are cheap and your doors never shut so nice afterwards. look for the OE location for these--hinges are rarely the problem
 

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Premium Member
1986 560SL with M120 V12 Engine, 1988 560SL Stock
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10,865 Posts
Cheep Latch fix

I see this thread is old but I figured I would resurrect it because I did invent an inexpensive solution to fixing these latches. I came across this post looking for ways to adjust my door latches on my 107 because they wouldn't close full. the 107 and 126 share the same latch.

First off I tried to harvest a latch off my parts car. I notice removing the screws seems to be a huge issue for a lot of people so let me show you my procedure for removing stubborn bolts. I didn't even try to just take an allen wrench to the bolts on this parts car without doing something else first because this parts car looked like it was under salt water. The first picture shows the fuse box on this car to give you an idea. I have a name for this car, its called Ebola, If I were to have purchased it today it would be called Covid-19.

Removal of screws:

1) Soak all screws and the edges of the mounting plate with penetration oil.
2) Give each screw head a quick blast with a flat nose tip on an impact gun, see pics 2 and 3. Note the gun used in picks 2 and 3 is a 0.499 shank Chicago Pneumatic 717, well overkill for this job an will in fact easily push the door post in if I wasn't careful. I really recommend the smaller 0.401 shank guns and still be careful. With the CP 717 I gave each bolt head about a 1/2 second burst with minimum trigger. If you hit it too hard you will damage the head of the bolt to the point where you will have to drill it out.
3) If you hit it just right in step 2 you will need to tap the allen wrench with a hammer as shown in picture 4. Note that it would be better to use a hex bit socket on a T handle so that pure torque can be applied to the bolt. In any case I was able to get 6 of the 8 bolts off on both sides of the car. Had I let the car sit over night with the penetrating out, they may have all come out.
4) Since I had three bolts out on each side I was able to break loose the fourth bolt by tapping on the opposite corner of the latch in such a way as to rotate the latch a few degrees in the lostening direction, see pic 5. A few degrees of rotation is all you need to break the corrosion and remove it.

Figuring out what was causing these latches not to work.

I took one latch that was known to work and one latch that was know to not work an manually latched them onto the door as shown in pic 6. I found that the difference between the one that would latch to the door and one that would not latch to the door was caused by the absence of a small but important plastic tab. Picture 7 shows a latch with the plastic tab present. That latch worked fine. Picture 8 shows a latch with the tab broken off, that latch does not work. Examining the lock I found that that tab was necessary to depress the secondary lock, which comes up when the primary lock is engaged. Picture 9 shows the secondary latch being pointed out with a cut tie wrap. With the plastic tab gone it would not push the secondary latch over center.

The fix:

To fix it I simply riveted on a metal tab made from a bent piece of 060" steel about 12mm by 18mm and riveted with a 5/32" pop rivet. See pic 10. Once riveted in place I gave it a final squeezes with a vice grip as shown in the next post. The final product is also shown in the next post and it works perfectly.
 

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