Mercedes-Benz Forum banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Early this month, the dealer replaced my rotors and pads, but the pads are just the 1st set of pads coming with the vehicle.
Is it reasonable that MB's rotors only last for one set of pads?
 

·
Outstanding Contributor , SDS Guru
1998 MB E300TD, 1997 MB E36 AMG, 2001 MB E55 AMG
Joined
·
4,267 Posts
Mercedes (German cars in general) rotors are softer than brake pads, so when you brake, you're actually scraping away more of the rotors as opposed to pads. This combination offers greater braking forces without having to resort to massive brake calipers/rotors.

Downside is increased wear. But usually the rotors are replaced every two pads, not one. Did dealer charge you?
 

·
Registered
1989 W124 260E
Joined
·
1,871 Posts
We will soon be in a once used item,, and throw it away .The car i own as had one set of rotors from 1989 up to 2014 .And it is 31 years old car .I replaced both discs and pads in 2014 .
 

·
Outstanding Contributor , SDS Guru
1998 MB E300TD, 1997 MB E36 AMG, 2001 MB E55 AMG
Joined
·
4,267 Posts
......ouch. For reference, the front rotors are replaced every two or three pad sets depending on driving habits.

Rear rotors last much longer, it's not uncommon to see them still having more than decent meat even after 100k, since a majority of the braking forces is in the front.
 

·
Registered
1999 E320, 2000 E320, 2003 E320 Wagon, 2005 C230K SS, 2010 Accord LX w Eibach & Koni FSD's
Joined
·
3,140 Posts
$906.65 for rear rotors and pads replacement.
You're going to pay a premium price whenever you take your vehicle to any dealer for a repair. If you're a DIYer, Genuine MB parts will be less than $200 for the rear (at least in USA).

It is not unusual for a Mercedes to have brake pads that doesn't go to the outer edge of the rotor. As the brakes wear, this will leave a raised edge. Therefore, the rotor is usually replaced with the pads.

I don't know why Mercedes do this. If they made the pad bigger, you would think there would be more braking surface area and increase performance. This surface area is not trivial.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Planethill

·
Registered
1999 E320, 2000 E320, 2003 E320 Wagon, 2005 C230K SS, 2010 Accord LX w Eibach & Koni FSD's
Joined
·
3,140 Posts
Just did the calculation for the rear 300mm rotor on a GLK. Assuming an 1.5 mm lip, there will be an increase of 2% in braking surface area (1,409 sq mm) on one side of the rotor = 4.36 sq in surface area (both side) per rotation of the rotor. This is for rotor surface swept area and not pad area.
 

·
Outstanding Contributor , SDS Guru
1998 MB E300TD, 1997 MB E36 AMG, 2001 MB E55 AMG
Joined
·
4,267 Posts
The lip actually offers better braking, and it also locks the pads in place, so it doesn't shift around or drop out like other cars. Surface area is negligible, but the dividends it pays is pretty good.

Most german cars do this.
 

·
W163 Crash Test Driver
2008 ML350 (Me!), 2010 GLK350 (Wife), 2003 ML-350 (Deceased)
Joined
·
1,647 Posts
$906.65 for rear rotors and pads replacement.
Of which 75% or more is labor. 😮 Next time, buy a socket set, watch a YouTube video and save $700. Buy aftermarket pads/rotors and save even more.

This topic comes up from time to time, and while many point to the vehicles parts, I truly believe that those who burn through pads and rotors constantly simply need a class in braking/driving technique. I see it everyday on my commute: People braking for no reason. Seriously...for NO reason. Like on the highway doing 70 and they want to change lanes, but there is a car already next to them. Instead of just taking their foot off the gas and letting the car slow down naturally so they can then move over, people hit the brake. Or you see traffic building a mile ahead. Again, instead of just slowing down, people brake (then realize they slowed down too much, speeding up and braking again!). I have seen some drivers that alternate back and forth between gas and brake for dozens and dozens of miles! Every time I see it, I say to myself "and they will be the ones complaining that their brakes suck and constantly need replacing".

But I digress! Seriously, if you feel like you are going through brake pads and rotors waaaay too fast, take a step back and analyze your own driving technique. Be conscious of your foot and try counting out loud how many times you hit the brake. Then ask yourself "did I really just need to hit the brake? Or was it reflex/unnecessary?". I think you will be surprised at how high the number gets from braking unnecessarily.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Bob338
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top