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for a person (me) with above average mechanical skills? I remember reading up on this procedure many years ago, but was 'scared off' with the idea of having to 'bleed' the brakes, etc. Sounded like one of those tasks I could reasonably tackle, but realizing that a simply screwup on my part could lead to diaster, I backed off!

The thread below about the EBC Greenstuff Pads & Rotors got me to thinking.

ReBell
 

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CURRENT: 2011 SL550 FORMER: C300, ML350, CLK550 Cabriolet, C240, ML320, 300TD
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Although periodic brake fluid changes are recommended, it is not necessary to bleed the brakes when just changing rotors and pads. If you've done any brake work before, the ML is easy. The floating caliper system on the ML320 (& 1999 ML430) is about as simple as it gets - no bearings to fool with and the calipers are easy to remove with two bolts each (the fronts are Torx). The fixed caliper system on the V8’s is ever so slightly more of a PITA since you have to drive some pins out to remove the calipers. Search the forum - there are many, many comments and links to some step-by-step photo guides.
 

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I have the fixed caliper brakes and can confirm that servicing them is not difficult.

I enjoyed replacing pads and rotors and would recommend the task to anyone who is inclined to do it.

Search for rotors on http://www.whnet.com/4x4/

or look at http://www.petefagerlin.com/ML/brakes.htm

and searching on this forum will reveal lots of information. Good luck!
 

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ae86pwr - 4/3/2006 4:18 PM

always get yourself a big ole hammer to pound the rotors out.
No doubt about this, I just did my this past weekend and I thought I was going to rip something apart trying to get them off.

Nothing to worry about, just brake dust comes flying off but be sure you have the right tools for the job.
 

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and about 2 cans of WD-40, spray plenty of WD-40 at the back of rotor to loosen out the sticky/rusty part.
 

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I only had problems removing the rotors the first time. After that, they now just seem to fall off. Maybe they come “pre-rusted� from the factory?
 

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rudeney - 4/3/2006 1:34 PM

I only had problems removing the rotors the first time. After that, they now just seem to fall off. Maybe they come “pre-rusted� from the factory?
Pre-rusted is a value added feature, something more they can charges us for..[:D][:D][:D]
 

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fyi - remember there should be one sensor on the driver's side. There sensor should be transfered onto the new pads. Mine cracked during the transfer so just be careful. Not a difficult task.
 

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It sounds pretty straight forward. The one question that

I have and that never gets addressed is the rear drum brake assembly for the parking brake. During a regular 4-wheel pad replacement, does one have to fool around with that mechanical nightmare at all??? What about when one has to replace the rear rotors? Somehow, in this case, we will have to deal with all that spring mechanism at the rear. Is there an easily written DIY for this or am I off left field here? I hate spring mechanisms!!!
 

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RE: It sounds pretty straight forward. The one question that

Darkmann - 4/3/2006 7:02 PM

I have and that never gets addressed is the rear drum brake assembly for the parking brake. During a regular 4-wheel pad replacement, does one have to fool around with that mechanical nightmare at all??? What about when one has to replace the rear rotors? Somehow, in this case, we will have to deal with all that spring mechanism at the rear. Is there an easily written DIY for this or am I off left field here? I hate spring mechanisms!!!
Well, back in the “good old days�, all brakes were like that! In fact, some cars still use rear drum brakes. They aren’t that hard to work on, although they are not as easy as most disc systems. The good news is that a drum parking brake rarely wears out so it’s doubtful you’ll ever need to disassemble the “nightmare� to replace the shoes. It does, however, need periodic adjusting and a good cleaning won’t hurt either. With the rotor/drum removed, soak it with some brake parts cleaner.

As for adjusting, this should be done with the tire mounted. Basically, there is and adjustment shaft that sits between the pair of shoes. To tighten the brakes, you extend the length of the shaft by turning a star wheel. With the rotor removed, you will see the star wheel (i.e. gear) sitting vertically near the top of the “nightmare�. There is a metal cog that keeps the star wheel from rotating backward and loosening the brakes. Make a note of the correct direction for rotating the wheel to tighten the shoes by expanding the adjustment shaft.

Directly behind the star wheel, on the back of the wheel hub assembly, there is a rubber plug covering the access hole. Remove it and practice adjusting the wheel with a screwdriver through this hole. Don’t tighten it though, because you may not be able to get the rotor/drum over the shoes. If you do over tighten the shoes, then you have to press the cog out of the way and rotate the star wheel the other direction to loosen them. This is easy to do with the rotor/drum removed, but much more difficult to do “blindly� through the access hole.

Once you have everything reassembled and the tire remounted, use a screwdriver to adjust the star wheel while rotating the tire. You want it just tight enough so that you can feel or hear the shoes barely dragging all the way around the drum. Replace the rubber cover once you’re done. Oh, technically, you are supposed to disconnect the parking brake linkage when adjusting the shoes, but I never do this.
 

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RE: It sounds pretty straight forward. The one question that

rudeney - 4/4/2006 4:06 PM
Well, back in the “good old days�, all brakes were like that! In fact, some cars still use rear drum brakes. They aren’t that hard to work on, although they are not as easy as most disc systems. The good news is that a drum parking brake rarely wears out so it’s doubtful you’ll ever need to disassemble the “nightmare� to replace the shoes. It does, however, need periodic adjusting and a good cleaning won’t hurt either. With the rotor/drum removed, soak it with some brake parts cleaner.

As for adjusting, this should be done with the tire mounted. Basically, there is and adjustment shaft that sits between the pair of shoes. To tighten the brakes, you extend the length of the shaft by turning a star wheel. With the rotor removed, you will see the star wheel (i.e. gear) sitting vertically near the top of the “nightmare�. There is a metal cog that keeps the star wheel from rotating backward and loosening the brakes. Make a note of the correct direction for rotating the wheel to tighten the shoes by expanding the adjustment shaft.

Directly behind the star wheel, on the back of the wheel hub assembly, there is a rubber plug covering the access hole. Remove it and practice adjusting the wheel with a screwdriver through this hole. Don’t tighten it though, because you may not be able to get the rotor/drum over the shoes. If you do over tighten the shoes, then you have to press the cog out of the way and rotate the star wheel the other direction to loosen them. This is easy to do with the rotor/drum removed, but much more difficult to do “blindly� through the access hole.

Once you have everything reassembled and the tire remounted, use a screwdriver to adjust the star wheel while rotating the tire. You want it just tight enough so that you can feel or hear the shoes barely dragging all the way around the drum. Replace the rubber cover once you’re done. Oh, technically, you are supposed to disconnect the parking brake linkage when adjusting the shoes, but I never do this.
I replaced my rear rotors and had no trouble with the drum brake, I just left the adjustment as it was and I was able to reassemble the rotor without any difficulty.

However, I must be blind, but I cannot see the rubber bung for adjusting the star wheel and cannot see how it can be done with the tyre assembled. If anyone has a picture I would be very grateful.
 
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