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1991 420SEL, 1989 Porsche 928-S4, 1973 Lincoln Continental Town Car, 1960 Lincoln Continental Mark V
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75 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Battery in my car died today - Murphy blinked! I didn't absolutely, positively, have to be somewhere in 15 minutes! LOL

Anyway, for the life of me, I can't figure out how to get the battery out of the car. I've got the terminal cables removed, and the washer plumbing out of the way - and the damned thing won't even wiggle.

I'm assuming something in the tray is holding it down, but I can't see anything to loosen between the battery and the passenger fender, and there's absolutely no room anywhere on the other 3 sides.

How do I release the battery to get it out of the car?

Thanks in advance
 

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1993 300TE, 1995 E320 Wagon
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1,895 Posts
There's a clip/bar of metal holding down the base of the battery, right at the bottom front (or either side, I don't remember). I recall a 10mm nut. Should be pretty easy to see with the washer bottle out of the way.
 

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1989 560SEL, 1988 300SEL, 1979 Toyota Cressida MX32, 2006 F150 Lariat
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1,542 Posts
There are 2 plates holding the battery in position. 2 10mm nuts and they are located in the front of the battery towards the washer tank. 1 on the left and 1 on the right. The plates are easy to locate if the washer tank has been removed and the area has been cleaned up.
 

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1991 420SEL, 1989 Porsche 928-S4, 1973 Lincoln Continental Town Car, 1960 Lincoln Continental Mark V
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75 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
That's what I was afraid of, and you're right. I had hoped even German engineers wouldn't require a radiator drain to remove a battery, but no ... they did.

The only way I could get the washer bottle out was to partially put an 3x4 oil drip pan under the car, disconnect the washer "heater" coil plumbing (uses coolant to heat the washer fluid), which - naturally, mean that about 1 quart of coolant drained out of the hose and coil, spashing down the battery, inner fender, and along the frame to drip (mostly) onto the drip pan.

What a frik'n mess! If they're going to heat the fluid this way (which is ingenious, in an of itself), the least they could have done was make the stupid thing easily removable.

Arg!

Anyway, with the washer reserviour removed, the batter could be wiggled out of it's compartment. I'm sure it will be even harder to put the new one in while keeping all the extra wires, hoses, and cables out of the way.

Actually, with where they have it - squeezed into the box just large enough to fit the battery and washer bottle, and securely covered with the hood, why lock it down anyway?

Or, if you have to lock it, put a rod with lock tabs with a bolt accessable from the side that could be spun to move the lock up or down without requiring removal of the washer bottle at all.

It should be a new Universal Law (aka, Common Sense) that anyone designing a usable part of a vehicle (buttons, seat adjustment, hood/trunk release, turn signals), or a part that isn't "permanent" for regular use (like batteries, spare tires, etc), must be required to actually use what they designed for 1 month, turning on/off, getting in/out, installing/removing, etc at least once a day. Then let's see if they can think of a better way to do it. :bash:

OK. I'm over (this) tantrum. :D
 

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W126 500 SEL 9/85 W124 E320T Brabus
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OMG :rolleyes: WTH do you think a battery is? You put it in and leave it there for years! This Mercedes is built by a team of the best engineers one can find and if they think, the battery should be fixed, then there are very good reasons.

As you took it out, you know the weight of the battery. What would happen with a thing of this weight in an accident? It would fly like a projectile through the area! Would you like to stand in the flight path of this projectile? :1poke:
 

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1991 420SEL, 1989 Porsche 928-S4, 1973 Lincoln Continental Town Car, 1960 Lincoln Continental Mark V
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75 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Oh, don't get me wrong! I'm not bashing Germin engineers. Porsche and Mercedes are definately two of the best engineered cars ever made. I'm actually kind of disapointed; I would have thought they (German engineers) would have come up with something slick (like that 90deg hood hinge) to make maintenance easier.

If it wasn't secured, it wouldn't go anywhere since is packed tight with the washer bottle. Unlike most American cars, where it's just resting on a plate behind a headlight or something. If you're in a bad enough accident that it can fly of of it's compartment, that means the hood has been removed, and the hinges sheered off - a missing battery is definately the least of your problems! And, a hood frisbee is considerably heavier than a battery.

And, like I said, I can think of 1 or 2 different methods of locking the battery in place that wouldn't require removing the washer bottle.

I was just venting; I'm in Phoenix, so most batteries rarely last longer than 2years. And, I probably wouldn't even bitch about that except I hate dealing with coolant. One of the few maintenance chores I don't do myself involve coolant (except topping it off).

It's always frustrating when seomthing that should be easy it's only complicated because (at least, in my opinion) the engineer/programmer/designer didn't completely think something through.

Thanks for all the help!
 

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'90 560 SEL RUF 42,000m, '90 560 SEL RUF 56,000m, '90 560 SEL RUF 150,000m '90 560 SEC RUF 225,000m
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12 Posts
Suggestion; unbolt the tray and vacumm/wash under it, then coat it with wd40 before you put it back. leaves and dirt get trapped under the trays and can rot them out. If you've stripped everything back it would be good to remove any crud under the tray before you bolt it back.
 

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1991 420SEL, 1989 Porsche 928-S4, 1973 Lincoln Continental Town Car, 1960 Lincoln Continental Mark V
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75 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Great minds think alike ;) There was only some dirt and leaves/needles, so no obvious acid damage so far.

One thing I couldn't find. Where should the batter overflow tube connect to? I've got it connected to the battery, but I couldn't find where to connect it down by the tray. I'm assuming, since it's got a plastic ribbed connector, it's supposed to go somewhere to channel the overflow acid safely out of the car, instead of draining onto the tray and inside fender.
 
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