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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The main thing that I need with my Unimog is identifying what is original and what is not. I need help with a few things. I'll attach some pictures for reference. A lot of things on my truck have been modified in unimaginable ways. if you have pictures of what original pieces should look like, that would be appreciated as well. I'll continue to update this as I get more into the truck.

  1. Picture 1 is what I have for a windshield wiper switch. It only has two speeds. I wouldn't mind pictures of wiring either.
  2. Picture 2 is the switch to turn on the pto I believe. I don't know what the small solenoid next to it is. I traced a wire from under the dash to it. The wire has been spliced in a ton of different ways and I want to get it back to normal.
  3. It's a longshot. Some random hanging wire I found underneath the dash
  4. I feel like it's almost what I'd imagine to be where you'd want to hook up any power supply for inside the cab. It just seems to have a few power lines coming in, but I feel like there's more a technical term for the junction. The other owners tapped a lot of wires in.
  5. I know the wiring to my headlights is way messed up. This is another connection I found near my headlights though. It's on the other side as well. I found the other end of both of them by the firewall spliced off. I'd almost imagine it to be an air line.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
A few more things.

  1. I'm sure this is engine hours. How many times do you think it has rolled over with 50,000+ kilometers on it? haha
  2. I found this connection up front with some spliced wires. It's a similar connection to the one that I found going to the solenoid at the PTO.
 

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OK, well, that is a bit of a mess. Clearly whoever worked on the wiring was a scatterbrain.
I have a U1450L, which is also a 427.111, and it is largely intact, so I might be able to help a little. The problem is that your wiring is so, um , modified that it may be hard to make one to one comparisons.

A. The wipers are controlled by a stalk on the steering column. The positions are O(off)- l - ll -lll.
The progression is Off - non-adjustable intermittent - Low - High, if I recall.
The Stalk has two plugs, which should just plug in to existing sockets in your wiring loom, if they are still there.

B. The Headlight switch is to the lower left of the dash, and it is a multi- position switch, with a small rotary knob next to it, which adjusts the brightness of the instrument lights. The light switch has a 'Pull out' function as well. If you grab the switch and (gently) pull it towards you, it turns on the rear Rear Fog Light, if the truck is so equipped. It is also known as an 'Inclement Weather' lamp. It is a bright red light that helps following drivers see that there is a vehicle ahead of them in fog, rain, snow, road spray, etc.

The switch is is little unusual when it comes to turning the Rear Fog Lamp on and off. First, you have to turn it to the right to the 'Headlights On' position, then you can turn the rear fog on, by pulling the switch out. It will stay out. To turn it off, you rotate the switch counterclockwise to 'Off', and the switch pops back in, turning the rear fog lamp off. You can't push it in to turn it off when in the 'Headlights On' position. When the light switch is parked in the 'Off' position, you can pull the switch out, but it is spring loaded, and it won't stick. I assume this allows you to momentarily turn the Rear Fog Lamp on to check the bulb (with an assistant back there looking at it). Maybe.

C. Under the left side of the dash, there should be a small sheet metal panel, which covers up the wiring (as seen on the Red truck below). On your truck, it would normally be the smaller panel as on my truck, and there probably isn't anything mounted to it. Depending on factory options, there could be a switch or something mounted to it.
On later trucks, this panel grew in size, and often had an hour meter mounted to it.
You can run without this panel, but if you have it, I'd install it to clean things up, and it keeps your left foot from getting into any of the wiring.

D. An owner's manual (BUCH und BILD, in Gaggenau, is the best source.) will have a schematic of the electrical system, which will help you trace out your wiring.

E. The socket on the front bumper....it could be anything. It is common to have a plug up front to power marker lights on a Snow Plow, for instance. If that is what this socket is for, then it will power up when the running lights / headlights are turned on. I'd put this on the back burner, since the wiring in the cab is more critical to sort out first.

F. If your truck has the high 'Plow Lights' mounted to the A pillars, then there will be a toggle switch on the left end of the dashboard structure. You have to open the door to access it. This is an Either / Or switch - You can power up the bumper mounted headlights or the plow lights, but not both at the same time, unless the circuits have been modified. The plow lights function as regular headlights, with the Low / High beam functions working via the stalk on the steering column as normal.

In Germany, it is not allowed to operate the higher Plow Lights unless there is an implement attached up front which blocks the regular headlights, I've been told. I'm not sure what the rules are in the US, but you can count on them varying by state. There is usually a maximum height allowed, when it comes to headlights, and guys with jacked up pick-ups can run into problems with this if they are way up there. The UNIMOG Plow Lights are higher yet....

Some Photos.
Green Vehicle Motor vehicle Car Hood
Car Vehicle Steering part Motor vehicle Speedometer
Car Speedometer Vehicle Odometer Motor vehicle
Font Screenshot Bicycle part Auto part Logo
Bicycle part Bicycle handlebar Rim Automotive exterior Automotive wheel system
Musical instrument accessory Wood Bumper Automotive exterior Hardwood
Hood Automotive tire Vehicle Car Automotive lighting
Car Motor vehicle Gear shift Automotive design Steering wheel
Gas Automotive exterior Auto part Machine Tool
 

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Regarding the hour meter, it looks like you are registering
2687 Hours ( The Red number is not a 10th… according to people on here that would know).
In looking at the chart in the owner’s manual
(424 series) this is not out of line for 50,000 Km.
There are a lot of possible variables of course.

The PTO controls can be in various places on or near the shift plate. The manual (424 again) shows the PTO clutch
Lever (11), as well as the 540 / 1000 RPM speed control (6).

The other diagram shows the under dash
Panel, number 213 .

Font Rectangle Parallel Number Document
Font Pattern Art Paper Visual arts
Jaw Gesture Font Newsprint Paper
Font Handwriting Art Book Number
Handwriting Font Parallel Pattern Rectangle
 

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Regarding your numbered photos, some thoughts, guesses, and wild speculation :

1. I'd look at where the wires for the rocker switch for the wipers come from. Is your control stalk in place on the steering column ? If not, I'd order one of those, as your high beams, horn, turn indicators, windshield washer and wipers are all controlled by that. If it is in place, then I'd get the voltmeter out and check to see if the thing is functional across all of its functions - presumably, there was some reason that the Professor went with the rocker switch. It might save time and trouble to just order a new stalk if there is anything sketchy about the original one...if it is still there at all.
The wiring schematic will call out the wire colors, so you'll be able to figure out what wire is what from that, hopefully.

In the backgound, something else to check is the position of your accelerator pedal at rest. Yours does not look bad, but what has happened to others is that the pedal has moved out of adjustment, and 'Flooring It' is not actually opening up the throttle all of the way. In other words, the pedal hits the floor before the throttle is open, and so you'd have an involuntary governor in place.
You'll note the different positions the pedal takes when at rest. Lining up with the brake pedal, more or less, looks to be pretty common, but the main thing is to make sure that the travel of the the pedal is synced up with the throttle linkage. Note - I'm using the term 'Throttle' in terms of giving the engine fuel, although these engines do not have a throttle body like a more modern Diesel might. The Go pedal makes the fuel flow to the engine increase as you step on it...to be blunt and untechnical.



Vehicle Plant Steering part Steering wheel Car
Vehicle Hood Automotive tire Automotive design Tire
Green Motor vehicle Vehicle Automotive tire Hood
Vehicle Motor vehicle Car Steering part Steering wheel
Tire Wheel Vehicle Automotive tire Car
Vehicle Automotive tire Hood Motor vehicle Automotive design
Tire Wheel Vehicle Car Motor vehicle
Tire Automotive tire Motor vehicle Bumper Yellow
Automotive tire Hood Motor vehicle Trunk Automotive exterior
Hood Motor vehicle Vehicle Automotive tire Steering wheel
 

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Photo 2.
It is hard to tell what is going on here - additional photos from other angles might help. it looks almost like a joystick with a shaft coming out of the aluminum housing, and then a ball hovering in space...connected to something else, maybe the 540/1000 rpm control. At first glance it does not look like factory PTO equipment, but it is hard to say from what is shown.
Wider shots of your dash and the whole shift plate would help the detectives.
'Watching the Detectives...'
 

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Photo 3.
You are holding a factory 2-pin Plug / Socket. I'll look up under my dash when it isn't raining to see if I can locate that on my truck. It looks like the plug / socket is partially disassembled (maybe), and we are looking at the backside of the socket part and the plug is plugged into it on the left side of the photo...the seam would be the break point between the plug and the socket, and the socket part has pulled out of, or been disassembled from its base. Maybe.
 

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Photo 4.
The Cad-plated bracket is normally hidden by the sheet metal panel, and the rectangular holes are for various plugs/ connectors. I have the same thing on my truck, and all of the holes are open. I imagine that if the UNIMOG is equipped with the Terramatic system or something, those holes might come into play.
In your photo, I'd get the meter out and pin down what the wires are doing - Hot or Ground ? Always Hot, or Key-on Hot ? Are they Fused ? What do they power ? And so on.

On Square Cab UNIMOGs, once you get past the battery circuit, the Hot leads in the truck are often black, but they can be any color or combination of colors (White w/ Blue stripe, Green with White stripe, etc.) as they branch out...except Brown. In Unimog land, the grounds are Brown.

I would not trust any of that, even on a factory fresh truck, until I had a lot of time with the meter and came to trust the conventions. On a truck like yours, or mine for that matter, which has had stuff added or altered by unknown actors, I always start with the meter to see what is hot, switched or otherwise, and what is ground. Some people just hook up stuff willy-nilly, and never pay any attention to wire color, wire gauge, fusing, or anything, so it is best to establish what you are dealing with for yourself. Then, I photo it, make a diagram/doodle that is labeled with polarity and colors, and often I'll put a tape label on the wires (as I see that you have done as well) so I don't have to figure it out twice.

I'm guessing that the heavy green wire might be a positive feed from the battery, and the smaller red and yellow wires are taking that power out to other places unknown. I'd check that guess with the meter, and if true, then backtrack to see if there is a fuse inline with the green cable. If not, I'd add one.

My Cad-plated bracket looks to be 'deeper' - mounted an inch or two closer to the firewall, than in your truck, but it is hard to tell.
 

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Photo 5
So, the headlight is at the bottom of the photo, the cab shock is to the right, and we are looking down on the bracketry that supports the pull-out step under the bumper.
The circled tube end does indeed look like an Air line. If you look into the end and there are no wires inside, then an Air line is a very good guess. What it is doing there....? More on that later.

The wire and plug that are dangling in space ?
Well, it could be that the two wires that are coming out of the plug deal and heading out the lower left corner are going to the headlight. The other two wires that are not connected to anything, but which come out of the same PVC tube that feeds the plug, could be for the parking lamp circuit for that headlight.
This Plug unit also looks to be partially disassembled, with the threads hanging in space. Some really fine work....

Now, the Air Line.
Since things have obviously been re-configured on your truck, it could be anything. It might be a fluid line that somebody re-did, to feed the bug juice to the hydraulic headlight adjustment. These lines are usually either white or pale blue, one color for each headlight. They route through the firewall and down the inside of each fender, where they dive down to enter the headlight housing, before they snap off cleanly, trashing the whole (ridiculous) system in an instant.
I don't think that is what your line is for, but it is not out of the question.
 

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The Front Bumper.
It looks to me that next to your Socket (which has the wiring chopped a few inches from the housing) is a fitting that looks like a female air fitting, with a black airline exiting it and disappearing under the radiator.

Photo 5 is not wide enough to show this line on the backside of the radiator, but it might go to a junction box that might then have a port for the disconnected Air line in photo 5.
They both look like Air lines, more than anything else. They may or may not have tied into the same circuit, however.

Putting an Air fitting on the front bumper is not uncommon, although they more often use a Glad Hand fitting, when done by the factory.
On German Military trucks, a single Glad Hand on the front bumper allows the truck's air system to be charged up if the truck is disabled. This allows the parking brakes to be disengaged, and the service brakes to function, if the truck is being towed or otherwise being recovered. A driver in the disabled (let's say) UNIMOG, can steer (with difficulty) and brake the truck, to help in the recovery and to help keep it from over-running the winch cable / tow strap , etc.
Your truck might have a home grown version of this, but it depends where the line goes. If kept in a garage or truck barn, especially in the winter, charging up the air system by using the shop air would allow for the truck to start and warm up for a much shorter period of time before it could be moved outside, so that the MogStink could assail the whole of Mother Nature, rather than just the life forms in the truck barn.

Another option is that this air tap on the front bumper is to plug in an air hose to air up tires, blow debris out of the radiator if mowing, and who knows what all. The question then would be 'Where does this line come from?" rather than where does it go to ?


Automotive tire Cylinder Gas Motor vehicle Mesh
Automotive tire Gas Electrical wiring Machine Auto part
Gas Engineering Auto part Cable Circuit component
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 · (Edited)
OK, well, that is a bit of a mess. Clearly whoever worked on the wiring was a scatterbrain.
I have a U1450L, which is also a 427.111, and it is largely intact, so I might be able to help a little. The problem is that your wiring is so, um , modified that it may be hard to make one to one comparisons.

A. The wipers are controlled by a stalk on the steering column. The positions are O(off)- l - ll -lll.
The progression is Off - non-adjustable intermittent - Low - High, if I recall.
The Stalk has two plugs, which should just plug in to existing sockets in your wiring loom, if they are still there.

B. The Headlight switch is to the lower left of the dash, and it is a multi- position switch, with a small rotary knob next to it, which adjusts the brightness of the instrument lights. The light switch has a 'Pull out' function as well. If you grab the switch and (gently) pull it towards you, it turns on the rear Rear Fog Light, if the truck is so equipped. It is also known as an 'Inclement Weather' lamp. It is a bright red light that helps following drivers see that there is a vehicle ahead of them in fog, rain, snow, road spray, etc.

The switch is is little unusual when it comes to turning the Rear Fog Lamp on and off. First, you have to turn it to the right to the 'Headlights On' position, then you can turn the rear fog on, by pulling the switch out. It will stay out. To turn it off, you rotate the switch counterclockwise to 'Off', and the switch pops back in, turning the rear fog lamp off. You can't push it in to turn it off when in the 'Headlights On' position. When the light switch is parked in the 'Off' position, you can pull the switch out, but it is spring loaded, and it won't stick. I assume this allows you to momentarily turn the Rear Fog Lamp on to check the bulb (with an assistant back there looking at it). Maybe.

C. Under the left side of the dash, there should be a small sheet metal panel, which covers up the wiring (as seen on the Red truck below). On your truck, it would normally be the smaller panel as on my truck, and there probably isn't anything mounted to it. Depending on factory options, there could be a switch or something mounted to it.
On later trucks, this panel grew in size, and often had an hour meter mounted to it.
You can run without this panel, but if you have it, I'd install it to clean things up, and it keeps your left foot from getting into any of the wiring.

D. An owner's manual (BUCH und BILD, in Gaggenau, is the best source.) will have a schematic of the electrical system, which will help you trace out your wiring.

E. The socket on the front bumper....it could be anything. It is common to have a plug up front to power marker lights on a Snow Plow, for instance. If that is what this socket is for, then it will power up when the running lights / headlights are turned on. I'd put this on the back burner, since the wiring in the cab is more critical to sort out first.

F. If your truck has the high 'Plow Lights' mounted to the A pillars, then there will be a toggle switch on the left end of the dashboard structure. You have to open the door to access it. This is an Either / Or switch - You can power up the bumper mounted headlights or the plow lights, but not both at the same time, unless the circuits have been modified. The plow lights function as regular headlights, with the Low / High beam functions working via the stalk on the steering column as normal.

In Germany, it is not allowed to operate the higher Plow Lights unless there is an implement attached up front which blocks the regular headlights, I've been told. I'm not sure what the rules are in the US, but you can count on them varying by state. There is usually a maximum height allowed, when it comes to headlights, and guys with jacked up pick-ups can run into problems with this if they are way up there. The UNIMOG Plow Lights are higher yet....

Some Photos. View attachment 2713007 View attachment 2713008 View attachment 2713009 View attachment 2713010 View attachment 2713011 View attachment 2713012 View attachment 2713015 View attachment 2713016 View attachment 2713017
The guy that did all of this was an absolute joke, along with whoever else worked on this thing. haha. Well, I need to buy that entire assembly for the blinkers along with the ignition.

My headlight switch does not pull out, but it is all there.

I have that panel. I just took it off while working on it.

This might be a dumb question, but where do you buy owners manuals from. I was talking to one of the suppliers around here, and they said you can't even get your hands on them anymore. I see you listed a few companies, are those a few retailers. I'd love to have a few manuals so I don't have to ask everyone on here for little information bits all the time.

Well, that wiring to the front bumper, next to the air socket, is in a round about way connected to the actuator that it hooked to the PTO lever. It makes it's way through the entire mess of wiring out to that. I believe that it probably worked some sort of motor on the front that worked in conjunction with the PTO. Here's a picture actuator connected to the PTO lever that's a little clearer.

No plow lights. The truck was from Mexico.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Regarding the hour meter, it looks like you are registering
2687 Hours ( The Red number is not a 10th… according to people on here that would know).
In looking at the chart in the owner’s manual
(424 series) this is not out of line for 50,000 Km.
There are a lot of possible variables of course.

The PTO controls can be in various places on or near the shift plate. The manual (424 again) shows the PTO clutch
Lever (11), as well as the 540 / 1000 RPM speed control (6).

The other diagram shows the under dash
Panel, number 213 .

View attachment 2713018 View attachment 2713019 View attachment 2713020 View attachment 2713021 View attachment 2713022
I should have noted that the speedometer was disconnected. This also means that the odometer hasn't been working. So, I really have no idea how many miles are on the truck, but that is a good help. I'm thinking that it has quite a few more than 50k though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Regarding your numbered photos, some thoughts, guesses, and wild speculation :

1. I'd look at where the wires for the rocker switch for the wipers come from. Is your control stalk in place on the steering column ? If not, I'd order one of those, as your high beams, horn, turn indicators, windshield washer and wipers are all controlled by that. If it is in place, then I'd get the voltmeter out and check to see if the thing is functional across all of its functions - presumably, there was some reason that the Professor went with the rocker switch. It might save time and trouble to just order a new stalk if there is anything sketchy about the original one...if it is still there at all.
The wiring schematic will call out the wire colors, so you'll be able to figure out what wire is what from that, hopefully.

In the backgound, something else to check is the position of your accelerator pedal at rest. Yours does not look bad, but what has happened to others is that the pedal has moved out of adjustment, and 'Flooring It' is not actually opening up the throttle all of the way. In other words, the pedal hits the floor before the throttle is open, and so you'd have an involuntary governor in place.
You'll note the different positions the pedal takes when at rest. Lining up with the brake pedal, more or less, looks to be pretty common, but the main thing is to make sure that the travel of the the pedal is synced up with the throttle linkage. Note - I'm using the term 'Throttle' in terms of giving the engine fuel, although these engines do not have a throttle body like a more modern Diesel might. The Go pedal makes the fuel flow to the engine increase as you step on it...to be blunt and untechnical.



View attachment 2713040 View attachment 2713030 View attachment 2713031 View attachment 2713033 View attachment 2713034 View attachment 2713035 View attachment 2713036 View attachment 2713037 View attachment 2713038 View attachment 2713039
From the previous set of pictures that I posted, you can see what is in place of the original blinker setup. I'll order another one and hopefully all of the wiring is still there.

As for pedal and fueling system, I think I know how that all works, or have a decent idea. I read up a little bit when I was looking into a turbo setup. I don't think that that's a possibility till everything else is in place.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 · (Edited)
Photo 2.
It is hard to tell what is going on here - additional photos from other angles might help. it looks almost like a joystick with a shaft coming out of the aluminum housing, and then a ball hovering in space...connected to something else, maybe the 540/1000 rpm control. At first glance it does not look like factory PTO equipment, but it is hard to say from what is shown.
Wider shots of your dash and the whole shift plate would help the detectives.
'Watching the Detectives...'
I put up a few more pictures of this.

Photo 3.
You are holding a factory 2-pin Plug / Socket. I'll look up under my dash when it isn't raining to see if I can locate that on my truck. It looks like the plug / socket is partially disassembled (maybe), and we are looking at the backside of the socket part and the plug is plugged into it on the left side of the photo...the seam would be the break point between the plug and the socket, and the socket part has pulled out of, or been disassembled from its base. Maybe.
It seems to have the wires ripped out the back side that's pictured. It's spliced into all sorts of extra stuff as well.

Photo 4.
The Cad-plated bracket is normally hidden by the sheet metal panel, and the rectangular holes are for various plugs/ connectors. I have the same thing on my truck, and all of the holes are open. I imagine that if the UNIMOG is equipped with the Terramatic system or something, those holes might come into play.
In your photo, I'd get the meter out and pin down what the wires are doing - Hot or Ground ? Always Hot, or Key-on Hot ? Are they Fused ? What do they power ? And so on.

On Square Cab UNIMOGs, once you get past the battery circuit, the Hot leads in the truck are often black, but they can be any color or combination of colors (White w/ Blue stripe, Green with White stripe, etc.) as they branch out...except Brown. In Unimog land, the grounds are Brown.

I would not trust any of that, even on a factory fresh truck, until I had a lot of time with the meter and came to trust the conventions. On a truck like yours, or mine for that matter, which has had stuff added or altered by unknown actors, I always start with the meter to see what is hot, switched or otherwise, and what is ground. Some people just hook up stuff willy-nilly, and never pay any attention to wire color, wire gauge, fusing, or anything, so it is best to establish what you are dealing with for yourself. Then, I photo it, make a diagram/doodle that is labeled with polarity and colors, and often I'll put a tape label on the wires (as I see that you have done as well) so I don't have to figure it out twice.

I'm guessing that the heavy green wire might be a positive feed from the battery, and the smaller red and yellow wires are taking that power out to other places unknown. I'd check that guess with the meter, and if true, then backtrack to see if there is a fuse inline with the green cable. If not, I'd add one.

My Cad-plated bracket looks to be 'deeper' - mounted an inch or two closer to the firewall, than in your truck, but it is hard to tell.
The wires going out feed a variety of things. It goes to the brake solenoid, the blinker setup, ignition, and wipers. The aftermarket fuses they put in are useless.

Good to know all of the browns are grounds.

I'll have to check everything a little more. I have done a little already.

Photo 5
So, the headlight is at the bottom of the photo, the cab shock is to the right, and we are looking down on the bracketry that supports the pull-out step under the bumper.
The circled tube end does indeed look like an Air line. If you look into the end and there are no wires inside, then an Air line is a very good guess. What it is doing there....? More on that later.

The wire and plug that are dangling in space ?
Well, it could be that the two wires that are coming out of the plug deal and heading out the lower left corner are going to the headlight. The other two wires that are not connected to anything, but which come out of the same PVC tube that feeds the plug, could be for the parking lamp circuit for that headlight.
This Plug unit also looks to be partially disassembled, with the threads hanging in space. Some really fine work....

Now, the Air Line.
Since things have obviously been re-configured on your truck, it could be anything. It might be a fluid line that somebody re-did, to feed the bug juice to the hydraulic headlight adjustment. These lines are usually either white or pale blue, one color for each headlight. They route through the firewall and down the inside of each fender, where they dive down to enter the headlight housing, before they snap off cleanly, trashing the whole (ridiculous) system in an instant.
I don't think that is what your line is for, but it is not out of the question.
So, first of all, I really wish I had that step..... it's long gone..... I didn't even know that existed till now.

I think the wires that are dangling are for the lights. The ones that are the two spades into the four prong female outlet go to the headlight. I think I put that in my other thread. It's fantastic work.

The air lines I believe are that light adjusting circuit you were talking about. I think the switch for that is missing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
The Front Bumper.
It looks to me that next to your Socket (which has the wiring chopped a few inches from the housing) is a fitting that looks like a female air fitting, with a black airline exiting it and disappearing under the radiator.

Photo 5 is not wide enough to show this line on the backside of the radiator, but it might go to a junction box that might then have a port for the disconnected Air line in photo 5.
They both look like Air lines, more than anything else. They may or may not have tied into the same circuit, however.

Putting an Air fitting on the front bumper is not uncommon, although they more often use a Glad Hand fitting, when done by the factory.
On German Military trucks, a single Glad Hand on the front bumper allows the truck's air system to be charged up if the truck is disabled. This allows the parking brakes to be disengaged, and the service brakes to function, if the truck is being towed or otherwise being recovered. A driver in the disabled (let's say) UNIMOG, can steer (with difficulty) and brake the truck, to help in the recovery and to help keep it from over-running the winch cable / tow strap , etc.
Your truck might have a home grown version of this, but it depends where the line goes. If kept in a garage or truck barn, especially in the winter, charging up the air system by using the shop air would allow for the truck to start and warm up for a much shorter period of time before it could be moved outside, so that the MogStink could assail the whole of Mother Nature, rather than just the life forms in the truck barn.

Another option is that this air tap on the front bumper is to plug in an air hose to air up tires, blow debris out of the radiator if mowing, and who knows what all. The question then would be 'Where does this line come from?" rather than where does it go to ?


View attachment 2713043 View attachment 2713044 View attachment 2713045
I think that the airline does go back to the tank. I'm not 100% sure yet. I have a few air leaks that I need to chase down as well. I'm wondering what that four pin female connection is. I've mentioned it in a few other posts. It leads back to that toggle or actuator next to the PTO switch.
 

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1991 Unimog 1250L wdb4271111w173869
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I put up a few more pictures of this.



It seems to have the wires ripped out the back side that's pictured. It's spliced into all sorts of extra stuff as well.



The wires going out feed a variety of things. It goes to the brake solenoid, the blinker setup, ignition, and wipers. The aftermarket fuses they put in are useless.

Good to know all of the browns are grounds.

I'll have to check everything a little more. I have done a little already.



So, first of all, I really wish I had that step..... it's long gone..... I didn't even know that existed till now.

I think the wires that are dangling are for the lights. The ones that are the two spades into the four prong female outlet go to the headlight. I think I put that in my other thread. It's fantastic work.

The air lines I believe are that light adjusting circuit you were talking about. I think the switch for that is missing.
 

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U1450L DOKA
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Hmmm...thanks for the additional photos. I'll see if there is anything to add from looking at those. Your steering column is an original MB UNIMOG part, just an earlier version. I had one like it on my earlier truck. It is a perfectly fine unit, it just does not have the steering lock on the column. The Turn indicators are a clamp-on unit, like the current aftermarket one, just the Mercedes version.
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Buch & Bild Unimog-Museum GmbH
buchundbild.de is the source for the manuals. They have owner's manuals, Workshop manuals, parts manuals, Data books, etc.
There are two good ways to search :
A. They list their publications available in English for the UNIMOG
And
B. They list everything they have for the 427.

Unfortunately, some of the things you'd want will only be available in German, but they are still worth getting, because they apply exactly to your truck. Having a workshop manual that is close (a 424 Series, when you own a 427 Series) can be very helpful, but it can also be way off. 3 piece axles in the Workshop manual, but 2- piece axles on the truck, for instance.

So, you pick and choose. Because the shipping time can vary from "not-so-bad to Long time, soon coming ",
it can be best to load up and get one shipment of the most useful stuff, rather than a lot of little bits, and maybe a second wad later.

There is a Thumb Drive workshop manual out there, apparently, that is less expensive than the books, but I'm not up on that. I think there is one for the 427 series, but somebody else will know better than I do.

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A note on your dash panel. It looks very good, and I notice a crack. This plastic is notoriously brittle. People often crack them when tightening the 4 bolts that hold it on. The Center Heater console has the same problem.
So, when you install it, I'd recommend adding a spring lock washer on each of the 4 bolts, and then carefully snugging it down. If you crank it tight, you can shatter the plastic around the hole, and it can be a mess.

For the existing crack, I'd clean it up and epoxy it on the backside, maybe carefully cutting a shallow V-groove with a Dremel for more bonding area, and clamping it tight if possible.Then, once the first pass is done, I'd probably epoxy another layer of plastic to reinforce the area around the holes. If left unattended, that whole corner could crack off, it is that touchy...

Then, whether you use those two holes drilled on the left or not, I'd get something in there to help reinforce them. It can be switches, or the plastic equivalent of an Oreo Cookie with a bolt in the middle. They were pushing it to drill holes that large in that area.

Dash panels are expensive, and they do not show up on Ebay.de all that often.


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