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Discussion Starter #1
Thanks in advance for any suggestions. And I apologize in advance for my simple language to describe my problem, I am the farthest thing from a mechanic.

So heres how it went:

I sat in dead traffic for a couple hours. The next morning there was a puddle under my car. It wasnt oil, but it felt like water with a slight oil texture. I guessed probably water that dripped down and hit parts that had oil/grease on them.

Now when I start the car it makes a noise in the very front of the engine. It seems that it is coming from the connection between the fan and engine. The connection wobbles and that seems to the source of the noise. The noise sounds like a whine/rubbing.

The car makes the noise at idle and it is constant. I cant tell if it changes with rpms.

Any ideas?

Thanks
 

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Hi, Brian.

My best guess is that your water pump is about to let go completely. Nice job on your description, you did good. The puddle is coolant, the wobble is the water pump bearing.

Check your expansion tank (where your radiator cap is) and see if you are at all low on coolant. If you are that would confirm it. *This is important*: Add some fresh water to the expansion tank to fill it up and then put the cap back on but only turn it to the first detent/notch. it will still be a bit loose but you won't be able to simply lift it right off. That will prevent the system from pressurizing and forcing more coolant out the bleed hole on the water pump.

Then close the hood and DO NOT drive the car.

Call your shop and tell them you need a water pump, make a date to get it in ASAP -- depending on how soon you need the car.

The next time you drive your car drive it straight and gently to the mechanic for repair. You should be okay doing that, but don't drive otherwise. If your water pump fails the wobbling part will break off and damage many other things under the hood and it will strand you as well. Your choice whether to instead call roadside assist for a tow to the shop, if it is close by you have a decent chance of getting there okay. Many miles away over freeways, you might not.

I'd recommend a new drive belt as well.
Altogether depending on where you are and your shop rates you could be looking at $600-$750 or more for the repair costs.

Take care and enjoy the ride,
Greg
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the response Greg.

I was low on coolant and have filled it up. I am bringing the car ASAP.

I appreciate your help.

Brian
 

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Hey Gregs210, what island is that where it can be done for $600-$750? My pump recently went bad and my indie wanted $1000 to replace the pump, the belt and the thermostat; he said the thermostat should be replaced just in case it was the root of the problem. The dealer, of course, wanted more. Since I'm cheap and adventurous, I spent about $200 for the parts and tool (the only tool I didn't have and had to buy was a fan wrench - bought on Ebay $40) and replaced it myself. It actually wasn't that hard to replace - getting the fan off was a bit trying, but I survived. Took half a day off, took my time, took a couple of breaks to watch some tennis and finished the project. I'm not trying to say you should do it yourself, but if you're marginally mechanically inclined and want to save a few $$$, you can do it.

Tennisguy
 

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Hey Gregs210, what island is that where it can be done for $600-$750? My pump recently went bad and my indie wanted $1000 to replace the pump, the belt and the thermostat; he said the thermostat should be replaced just in case it was the root of the problem. The dealer, of course, wanted more. Since I'm cheap and adventurous, I spent about $200 for the parts and tool (the only tool I didn't have and had to buy was a fan wrench - bought on Ebay $40) and replaced it myself. It actually wasn't that hard to replace - getting the fan off was a bit trying, but I survived. Took half a day off, took my time, took a couple of breaks to watch some tennis and finished the project. I'm not trying to say you should do it yourself, but if you're marginally mechanically inclined and want to save a few $$$, you can do it.

Tennisguy
Hey, TG, with him in Boston you are probably correct. Some indies would also use rebuilt (which is fine) and that saves a bit on the parts end.

I am a huge DIY fan, bit since our OP admitted a lack of mechanical ability, didn't recognize coolant and -- while offering a very good layman's description of the problem -- seemed to have trouble identifying components under the hood. My guess was therefore that he didn't have the present interest and ability to jump in and fix it. Doesn't mean it can't be learned, but tools aside, a WP would not be my recommendation for an initial foray into the DIY forest. ;)

Congrats to you for the successful replacement. The good feeling of accomplishment is compounded by the money saved, too. Tennisguy 40, MB Love. :thumbsup:

Take care and enjoy the ride,
Greg
 

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Discussion Starter #6
you guys havent learned the trick of calling roadside assistance and offering a couple hundred bucks to the tech? I havent been to the dealer in 4 years.
 
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