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1988 560 SEC
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Discussion Starter #21
As I waited for the new front crank seal to arrive I set about taking care of small projects. First was the transmission cooler lines. I do not know if the hoses on the car were the originals but they were ready to be changed as one had an obvious split just waiting to rupture.

Next up I dedicated an hour to re-sealing my SLS pump. Since it was off the car and its history was unknown, now was the perfect time to do it. I used Kent's seal kit which includes two of each seal in case you rip one. However, it only includes one rear seal and is a genuine MB part. You will also need to supply your own copper crush washers for the high pressure output banjo bolt. The kit comes with a really good set of instructions and I also watched all the videos I could find related to re-sealing the pump. For the cost of the kit ($75) I was a bit disappointed it did not include the crush washers or the torque spec once you get ready to bolt it back up to the block. I have another post with this question. I let everything soak overnight in solvent before re-assembling per the instructions.
 

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1988 560 SEC
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Discussion Starter #22
The new Erling crank seal arrived from Amazon and it is a 99% match to the original. Much closer than the Corteco seal I had. The old seal came out with little fuss and the new seal went in as planned using my press to ensure it was pushed in and seated properly.

In keeping with the theme "let's replace everything that looks worn or suspect" I replaced the oil pump chain tensioner guide. The old one showed some wear so installing a new one from MB for under $3.00 was a no-brainer. I also have a new Iwis oil pump chain to go with it which be installed later. I moved to replacing the water channel o-rings in the timing cover. The old ones were flattened from age so they definitely needed replacing. I cleaned up the grooves they sat and used a very small dab of Shoe Goo behind them to ensure they did not fall out while re-installing the timing cover.
 

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1988 560 SEC
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Discussion Starter #23
As I let the Shoe Goo dry I turned my attention to the rear accumulator spheres. I hosed down the fitting with some PB blaster the night before and luckily everything came apart without much of a fight. Once the old accumulators are off you have swap the hose adapter over to the new ones. Again, disappointing at $80/each they do not include the copper crush washer that goes in-between the adapter and the sphere. Luckily I had some extras that were the right size. Its a messy job so be prepared!

The oil level sensor pass-through plug has two o-rings on it. Mine had been leaking from this point so new o-rings has been ordered. For small stuff like this I order two and even three of everything in case I damage one. A small somewhat fiddly job but rewarding none the less with one more item checked off.
 

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1988 560 SEC
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Discussion Starter #24
With the adhesive dried on the timing cover o-rings, now was the time to re-install the timing cover. It was a job that actually took three tries as it felt like it was getting caught on the center chain idler gear. The final time felt the most re-assuring so on it went. As I began to tighten the bolts I made sure the motor spun over freely by hand.

To end the weekend on a win I took 15 minutes and replaced the under-hood fuel lines with new FI rated 5/16 fuel hose and new FI hose clamps. The clamps are not tightened at the moment which allow me to get the right arc on them once I get ready to button everything back up.

That was enough for one weekend!
 

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1988 560 SEC
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Discussion Starter #25
It has been awhile since I have posted an update but rest assured, I have been very busy. I have run in to various issues here and there but the community has been very supportive! Once I had the timing cover back on I installed the resealed SLS pump and routed the new SLS pressure hose. I also re-installed the air pump valve, cleaned and re-installed the air pump, and got the air pump hoses in place so I could route the SLS hose around everything. I had cleaned up all the grommets and hardware which made everything nicer to work with. Installation was straight forward but took some trial and error to get the angle correct on the connection going to the SLS pump.

With the SLS hose done I turned my attention to buttoning up the oil pan. I let the bolts sit overnight in parts cleaner. Looking back on it I wish I had just bought new ones. In the pictures you can see the newly installed Iwis oil pump chain and previously installed oil pump chain tensioner rail. I cleaned up the pan and took about 15 minutes to clean out all the oil pan holes with a tap. This would ensure all of the fasteners were properly torqued. A new gasket with a skim coat of black RTV on the pan was that was needed to seal it up. I also installed a magnetic oil drain plug and new copper crush washer.
 

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1988 560 SEC
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Discussion Starter #26
Next up was the water pump. I picked up a new Graf water pump and a new thermostat. When I removed the old water pump I took note of the position of each bolt by numbering them 1 - 8 with the #1 position being the left of the two holes on top. Experience has taught me that most cars have specific size bolts that go in to each location and the 560SEC is no different. The original bolts were very crusty so I ordered new ones from Fastenal. They are class 10.9 and the beautiful yellow zinc coating compliments the new water pump nicely. I also cleaned up the thermostat cover and bypass neck. As with any water pump replacement I also installed a new bypass hose and clamps. The pictures really show it was all time and money well spent.

A list of all the bolts and sizes are below

Water Pump to Engine - all are M8 x1.25
Bolts 1 - 4 60mm long. #5 is 83mm long. #6 & 7 are 65mm long. #8 is 135mm long. I had to cut off a few millimeters from the Fastenal bolts for #5-8 as they were a little too long and bottomed out

Upper Bypass Neck - all are M8x1.25
85mm, 65mm, and 30mm

Thermostat housing - all three are M6x1.0 and are 22mm long
 

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1988 560 SEC
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Discussion Starter #27
When I was installing the air pump and hoses for the SLS hose routing, two of the three split due to age. Luckily they are easy to find and two sellers on eBay had the best price. All are genuine MB parts and went with no drama.

Next up was the new radiator. The one in the car was showing its age with rust forming in the corners. It is a Behr unit from 2002 and made in South Africa. Seems like most owners recommend Nissens radiators. A new Nissens radiator is $246 and carries a 2 year warranty. A Spectra radiator on Amazon also has a 2 year warranty, has really good reviews, and only $120 shipped to my door. It is made in China and I figure its worth a shot. Below are some side by comparisons. I will report my experience once I get some miles on it. Initial impressions are good.
 

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1988 560 SEC
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Discussion Starter #28
Some other non-glamorous items were checked off the list, battery tray was stripped and painted, distributor installed with new shaft seal, new Bosch rotor and cap installed, new plug wires run, fuel lines were re-connected, and the clamps tightened on the new rubber hoses. I spent several days over-coming issues with two spark plugs holes, see my thread about it. Again, the community came through and after some patience and finesse I successfully repaired them. New NGK BP7ES spark plugs were installed as non-resistor Bosch plugs are no where to be found.

One small detail was the strap holding the lower radiator hose. The original was toast so I ordered a variety of clamps from McMaster-Carr. The clamp pictured next to the old clamp was one size too big. The clamp I ended up installing was smaller. After the hole was enlarged using a step drill bit the clamp was installed and as you can see it will do its job for many years to come.

With everything buttoned up and double checked and my wife in the driver seat, I asked her to turn the key so I could check for any fuel leaks. All connections and hoses looked good so I hooked up a bottle to allow the SLS system to flush. Another turn of the key and the car fired up after only a few revolutions. Within about 8 seconds the car settled in to a nice idle. The SLS pump started pulling new fluid from the bottle in the car the as old fluid made its way to the catch bottle. This test was to confirm the car would run and generate oil pressure. Once I finish the re-seal job on my power steering pump and get all the belts on, I will fill the cooling system and check for leaks or issues.

It has been a very productive weekend but getting to hear the engine run again is a huge milestone!
 

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1989 SEL 560
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It has been awhile since I have posted an update but rest assured, I have been very busy. I have run in to various issues here and there but the community has been very supportive! Once I had the timing cover back on I installed the resealed SLS pump and routed the new SLS pressure hose. I also re-installed the air pump valve, cleaned and re-installed the air pump, and got the air pump hoses in place so I could route the SLS hose around everything. I had cleaned up all the grommets and hardware which made everything nicer to work with. Installation was straight forward but took some trial and error to get the angle correct on the connection going to the SLS pump.

With the SLS hose done I turned my attention to buttoning up the oil pan. I let the bolts sit overnight in parts cleaner. Looking back on it I wish I had just bought new ones. In the pictures you can see the newly installed Iwis oil pump chain and previously installed oil pump chain tensioner rail. I cleaned up the pan and took about 15 minutes to clean out all the oil pan holes with a tap. This would ensure all of the fasteners were properly torqued. A new gasket with a skim coat of black RTV on the pan was that was needed to seal it up. I also installed a magnetic oil drain plug and new copper crush washer.
HardwayMB, your pictures show you removed the oil dipstick tube. What method did you use to reinstall the oil dipstick tube? Thanks-Tom
 

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1988 560 SEC
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Discussion Starter #32
HardwayMB, your pictures show you removed the oil dipstick tube. What method did you use to reinstall the oil dipstick tube? Thanks-Tom
Hey Tom, I left it in the freezer overnight. Once I got ready to install it I moved very quickly. It pretty much slid in and seated with no problem.
 

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1989 SEL 560
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Hey Tom, I left it in the freezer overnight. Once I got ready to install it I moved very quickly. I pretty much slid in and seated with no problem.
This is exactly what I was looking for. I have used the freezer/warmer trick before but sometimes I just need a reminder. Thanks-Tom
 

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1988 560 SEC
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Discussion Starter #34
Next up was to re-seal the power steering pump. As I showed in another thread, I modified an adjustable pitman arm puller to remove the pulley I damaged that was on the pump I purchased for wooky_chew-bacca. With the pulley off it was apparent the front shaft seal was shot. After a good cleaning of the pump I drilled two small holes in the old seal and screwed in some long wood screws and washers. I was able to use my pliers to work the seal out. Once it got started I pretty much pulled it out by hand. Resealing these Vickers pumps has been covered in other threads so I purchased a DHP seal kit and front shaft seal and got to work. Once apart, my pump had traces of rubber in the pump as you can see in the picture. I am guessing this was the seal in the middle of the pump body failing over time. I had considered trying to replace it but seeing the issues other owners have run in to with pumps not pumping once they were taken completely apart and put back together, I did not want to chance it. The rear seal and front shaft seal was replaced. I could not get the 30mm hex plug out so it stayed. A new Mann filter was installed. The pulley I purchased on eBay arrived with the impressions from the bubble wrap in the paint so it was stripped, re-painted, and installed. I must say, it looked very nice sitting on the bench.

I also cleaned up the air cleaner assembly and dropped in a new air filter and crankcase filter. Easy peasy!
 

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1988 560 SEC
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Discussion Starter #35
The PS pump went back on the car with no drama along with all the new Conti-Tech drive belts. The fan shroud and cooling fan was reinstalled along with a new upper radiator hose. I ran the return line for the PS pump to an empty bottle so I could let the PS pump flush the old fluid out. I filled the overflow tank with a mix of Zerex G-5 coolant and distilled water and let the radiator take on as much as it could. With my wife in the driver seat she started the car and worked the steering wheel. The power steering pump whined pretty loudly the whole time. The PS system originally had ATF in it and I was filling it with clear synthetic PS fluid as recommended by Kent M. I am unsure if the change over to synthetic is causing the pump to whine or something else. Should I consider flushing out the synthetic and go back to ATF? Should I clean and re-seal the other pump on my bench and try it? I welcome any input here.
 

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Discussion Starter #36
As the car warmed up I kept adding the mix of distilled water and Zerex coolant. All of the oil that had leaked on to the manifolds was burning off so I got to contend with all the smoke until it was gone. The heater is not getting hot so I suspect the mono-valve needs attention. The car's temp was hovering around 82 C which is 180 F. I would like for it to be a little lower but unsure if that is possible. With the power steering pump whining but the power steering working, I decided to go for a drive up and down the block.

This would be the first time I have driven the car since January. First impressions, I need to adjust the timing a little as it feels off by only a slight amount. The transmission shifted like butter! It certainly helped that it was now receiving the proper vacuum signal. The car feels like it has a ton of power. Just puttering down the street, it was hard not to take it up to speed a little. The PS pump is the only real let down but that will be resolved over the next few evenings. All in all, I am just happy that it runs again and moves under its own power. A true milestone moment in my ownership of the car. If I can get the PS pump resolved I am hoping to take it to Cars and Coffee on Sunday. I also installed the new flexible air tubes as the originals were toast. They really breath new life in to the engine compartment.
 

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1985 500SEL
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As the car warmed up I kept adding the mix of distilled water and Zerex coolant. All of the oil that had leaked on to the manifolds was burning off so I got to contend with all the smoke until it was gone. The heater is not getting hot so I suspect the mono-valve needs attention. The car's temp was hovering around 82 C which is 180 F. I would like for it to be a little lower but unsure if that is possible. With the power steering pump whining but the power steering working, I decided to go for a drive up and down the block.

This would be the first time I have driven the car since January. First impressions, I need to adjust the timing a little as it feels off by only a slight amount. The transmission shifted like butter! It certainly helped that it was now receiving the proper vacuum signal. The car feels like it has a ton of power. Just puttering down the street, it was hard not to take it up to speed a little. The PS pump is the only real let down but that will be resolved over the next few evenings. All in all, I am just happy that it runs again and moves under its own power. A true milestone moment in my ownership of the car. If I can get the PS pump resolved I am hoping to take it to Cars and Coffee on Sunday.
Love the extensive work you've done on the SEC. Theres nothing like the feeling of a victory lap around the block after repairs. I've been following the thread and i am envious of the work you've been getting after as i've only had the time and opportunity to work on minor annoyances and not those big noticeable jobs. What do you have in mind after the PS pump?
 

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1990 560SEC, 129,00 miles, in good shape, starting to do some small mods-steering wheel, exhaust
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As the car warmed up I kept adding the mix of distilled water and Zerex coolant. All of the oil that had leaked on to the manifolds was burning off so I got to contend with all the smoke until it was gone. The heater is not getting hot so I suspect the mono-valve needs attention. The car's temp was hovering around 82 C which is 180 F. I would like for it to be a little lower but unsure if that is possible. With the power steering pump whining but the power steering working, I decided to go for a drive up and down the block.

This would be the first time I have driven the car since January. First impressions, I need to adjust the timing a little as it feels off by only a slight amount. The transmission shifted like butter! It certainly helped that it was now receiving the proper vacuum signal. The car feels like it has a ton of power. Just puttering down the street, it was hard not to take it up to speed a little. The PS pump is the only real let down but that will be resolved over the next few evenings. All in all, I am just happy that it runs again and moves under its own power. A true milestone moment in my ownership of the car. If I can get the PS pump resolved I am hoping to take it to Cars and Coffee on Sunday. I also installed the new flexible air tubes as the originals were toast. They really breath new life in to the engine compartment.
Nice outcome, not the easiest engine bay to detail and end up with a grab your attention eye appeal. Too many frick'n vac lines, linkages, and other hoses/stuff that God knows WTH they do.

Although I guess us true MB car nuts do get excited over a clean 126 bay. Would have liked to have seen one in the showroom totally brand new.
 

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1988 560 SEC
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Discussion Starter #39
Based on yesterday's test drive I wanted to tackle a few things this evening. On my way home I picked up 4 quarts of MB power steering oil. It comes in a gray bottle and the fluid is the color of honey. I had read where other owners had the best luck with the MB fluid so I figured it was worth a shot. At $14/qt it is pricey but chalk it up to cost of doing business. Before starting the engine I turned it over to TDC and adjusted to the distributor so that the rotor was spot on. I have read lots of debates on the need to do this but I feel this is the baseline the EZL needs.

In preparation for another PS pump flush I sucked out as much of the old fluid as possible. Using a rubber cork I had in my collection, wrapped in some Teflon tape I screwed it in to the return line hole. This allowed me to fill the reservoir with much more fluid and not have to worry about it leaking out of the return line hole. One thing to note, get the biggest container to catch the PS fluid as the pump moves a lot of fluid very quickly. I took my eyes off the container for a second and when I looked back I had a volcano of PS fluid coming out. A few choice words and 10 minutes of clean up followed.

With everything back together another test drive was in order. The pump was now quiet at idle but still groaned when turning, especially at a dead stop. Bummer. I have read where taking it on the highway might cure it but I am not there yet. I did drive it out of the neighborhood a little bit, getting it up to 60mph for a small stretch. The idle adjustment seems to have done the trick as now it is very smooth. The temp never got above the hash-mark above 80 so I think my cooling system is in good shape. A new cooling fan clutch is in order but not urgent at the moment.

Tomorrow evening I am hoping to do a full systems check to get it ready for inspection on Friday morning. Its getting there and it felt good to finally have it out on a real road again.
 

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1991 560 SEC 1994 E500 2014 E350 Cab
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I think you are better off with the proper fluid, good call. I had a similar experience flushing the SLS, underestimating the speed of the flow.
 
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