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US spec MB560SL 1986, Audi A4 and A6, Ford Taunus 1964 17M and 2.0 1975
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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
My -86 560SL wheel angles were inspected today, I have planned to use wider tires. This is good point check and get adjusted correct wheel alligment and position values.

Before corrective adjustments 8 values from 20 were out of their tolerances. Passenger side front wheel toe-in remain out of its tolerance window because of loose wheel bearing.

While I was there I snap couple of pictures about the front wheel bearing cleaning and regreasing. Hope these pics will help others imagine how to clean and regrease the front wheel bearings. Used tools are pictured.

New parts and chemicals:

- MB front wheel special green grease 150g for two wheels A 002 989 0051 10.
- front wheel bearing rear side sealing ring.
- front wheel grease cap
- Loctite 242 medium locking glue
- brake cleaning solvent and small brush

1.) remove wheel and brake saddle assembly.
2.) remove grease cap - mine was too tight and I have to broken it.
3.) remove radio suppressor spring.
4.) loose bearing clamping nut and washer.
5.) remove outer bearing carefully.
6.) remove brake disk.
7.) clean steering knuckle bearing seats.
8.) remove old bearing rear side sealing ring from brake disk - mine was really tight and I have to broken it.
9.) wash both bearings and brake disk center hole/hub from old grease.
10.) fill new grease into both in/out bearings, inside the brake disk hole/hub 50g new grease and fill 20g new grease into cap. Provide grease also for roller faces. Look the pics.
11.) reinstall the bearing parts. Tab gently the new rear seal ring into its place by friendly hammer.
12.) adjust the front bearing free play 0,01-0,02mm. I tightened one wrench below the wheel bolt and listened the point were the freeplay sound is zero. Bearing clamping nut socket screw tightening torgue is 20Nm. Edit: Check that you can barely rotate the washer by fingers. Close the grease cap.
13.) clean brake disk and pad surfaces carefully.
14.) fix the brake caliber/pad assembly bolts using Loctite 242 medium range glue, brake caliber bolts tightening torque is 115Nm according the MBNA service book.

EDIT:
I dig my used front wheel seal ring from trashes, the writings on this 560SL -86 seal ring are:

011 997 6147
CFW A1
45-64-12/7
W.Germany

So it is most propably factory original, West Germany has not exists since the production era.
 

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US spec MB560SL 1986, Audi A4 and A6, Ford Taunus 1964 17M and 2.0 1975
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Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
More pics..

more pics...

EDIT: MBNA W107 Service book greasing instructions:

"Fill hub cap with spesified grease approx. Up to edge of bead.

Fill roller caga of inner tapered roller bearing well with grease, insert inner race with roller cage into the hub and apply grease to the roller faces.

Fill the radial sealing ring with grease between the sealing lip and the dust lip, then press in using special tool.

Note: If too much grease is used, the filling action causes the grease to overheat and it can lose its lubricant properties. The amount of grease must however not to be too small, otherwise the tapered roller bearings might not be properly lubricated."

Total capasity 70g, in hub with bearing 50g, in wheel cab 20g.
 

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1986 300 SL Euro spec - Signal Red/Black Eng/Trans: Inline 6 (M103.982) / 722.322 Auto
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1,976 Posts
Thanks for the post YKA :thumbsup:
 

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Outstanding Contributor , Bob's Your Uncle!
-----'83 280 SL----- 5 speed....The PIG
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29,494 Posts
Great thread!



But, I'm sorry.

Bearing grease is bearing grease. The only caveat is not to mix synthetic with dino.
 

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1977 450SL
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257 Posts
It almost appears that they are applying the grease to the surface of the bearing. I was taught to pack the grease into the bearing by forcing it in. Blob in palm and and force in to bearing by pressing bearing edge into blob of grease.
Maybe they were able to force it in with the squeeze tube
 

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Always Remembered RIP
1979 280sl 4 sp w/ac 1957 MGA 1998 volvo xc/70 2004 F150
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6,050 Posts
I've never seen a bearing packed like that either, it has to be forced into the rollers. There is a bearing packing tool but I was taught to hand pack them and I aint about to change.
 

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1979 280SL, 1984 280SL
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5,654 Posts
a most thorough job!

Either method of greasing the bearings will be fine. A bearing with rolling elements will find its own operational charge of grease. The hand pack method is mine as well- once the bearing reaches operational speed it will throw off any excess quantity of grease into the bearing cap or between the inner and outer bearings. As the bearings warm up and the grease is displaced, the lubricating oils in the grease will flow and provide lubrication.
 

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1987 560SL
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406 Posts
Sorry guys, but I don't agree. The only proper way to lube a wheel bearing like this is to pack it full of grease. This can be done by hand or with a power packer.

The rollers must be packed with grease to avoid bearing failure.
 

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1979 280SL, 1984 280SL
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Respectfully disagree. Do what works for you, but any rolling element bearing WILL throw off most of the grease you have packed into the hollows around the rollers, under the retainer.

No doubt you have purchased pre-lubed bearings somewhere along the line, and noticed that there did not seem to be much lube included. This is because the manufacturer has established the charge of lube to be the maximim the bearing will hold operationally. Any extra they include will be wasted, the bearing discharging the excess.
 

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1977 450SL
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257 Posts
I hand pack because the first one I ever did was on my fathers truck in 1974 and he said to do it that way or he would bust my ass......:D
good enough reason for me
 

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Outstanding Contributor , Bob's Your Uncle!
-----'83 280 SL----- 5 speed....The PIG
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29,494 Posts
I hand pack as well.

But...I hold Chief as the last word on this.
 

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1987 560SL
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406 Posts
Any replacement bearings I've purchased had a bit of rust preventative on them. I washed them with solvent and hand packed them before installing them.

I fill all the voids between the rollers, cages and races with grease. I'm comfortable with that practice and have never had a bearing failure.
 

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R/C107 Moderator
1986 560SL: '84 500SL: '84 280SL 5 speed: other 107s
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32,318 Posts
I wondered what those two concave discs with a grease zerk were for.

Just kidding. It works great with an air operated grease gun. Bought the air grease gun several years ago for the farm.
 

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Premium Member
'72 350SL, '85 300D, '98 E320, '19 Subaru Outback (sold '14 GLK250)
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10,325 Posts
I have used a Ziplock bag to pack the bearings. It seems to me that you want to at least get grease into the bearing before you use it. It is true that much of it may be thrown out, but I wouldn't think it would be advisable to have no grease inside the bearing to start with.

Regarding setting the bearing free play at 0,01-0,02mm. An experienced mechanic may be able to do this by feel, but don't MB recommend using a dial indicator? I bought a cheap one from Princess Auto (similar to HF) and it gives me some confidence I am close to the proper clearance.

The MB Chassis Shop Manual (in stickies) covers all of this in detail in sections 33-300, -310, -320. The do say to use dial indicator and to "Fill roller cages or tapered roller bearings well with grease. Also provide grease for roller faces" Elsewhere it says how much to put in caps (20g)

But, we do seem to pay more attention to these things these days! I remember doing wheel bearings on my early British cars. Just pack in some grease, tighten castle nut until it was tight, then back off a bit until one of slots lined up so split pin could be put in and we were good to go! Seemed to work!
 

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1981 380SL
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256 Posts
Packing a wheel bearing with new grease using the palm of your hand is one of the most satisfying parts of wrenching. Why would you deny yourself the pleasure?

Also, I, for one, have ruined a wheel bearing by slathering grease on the outside rather than packing. That's when I learned how to do a proper packing job. It wasn't a Mercedes, but Mercedes use the same tapered wheel bearings everyone else does.

And, yes, we know that most of that grease will be thrown off. You pack so that it starts well lubricated. Just like installing a new camshaft with plenty of assembly lube.
 

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US spec MB560SL 1986, Audi A4 and A6, Ford Taunus 1964 17M and 2.0 1975
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1,419 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
yka what is the history of the specialized tool in pic 9 14mm bent combination wrench?
This special 14mm bent wrench has story from year 1991 when I graduated as engineer. My godmother gave me as graduate present some money - with that money I bought a small japanese car Datsun 100A. Among the other difficulties the starter was broken. I had to bend my 14mm wrench to open the lowest starter fixing bolt. Datsun has gone away a long time ago but I have kept this bended tool with me - it is like a good memory about the nice graduate present from my Godmother.
 

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'89 300TE, '79 450SL, '01 ML320
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Seems as tho the poor 14mm gets all the abuse, I've got a couple mangled up for adjusting valves on the OM617 :D



Fish
 

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Premium Member
1986 560SL with M120 V12 Engine, 1988 560SL Stock
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10,170 Posts
I hand pack out of habit, but As Chief says I believe that to be overkill. I think the most important thing is the overall quantity 75gm per side. I have also found these bearings to be really forgiving for the way they are sized for this application. I have seen people use all sorts of preloads from really tight to really loose, but rarely do they fail. My guess is they are over sized to be abused in the field.
 
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