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My console had a similar crack. I thought about various ways of doing a repair, but then was lucky to find a complete console in good condition here in Canada. The console was black, but I needed it to be brown (Mahogany). So I too redyed it.

Vinyl dyes/paints are available at auto stores. SEM is one manufacturer. However, colours are limited. World Upholstery sell dyes (also made by SEM?) that match the Mercedes colours. Mercedes-Benz Upholstery, Seats, Carpets, Interior Panels, Convertible Tops, Floor Mats, Headliners and Other Trim Accessories from World Upholstery and Trim

Picture of original black console. I removed the black carpet and replaced with new (I was installing new carpets throughout)
console.jpg

These pics show that console installed after dying. The dye has stood up well. I coated all of the lower part of the dash at same time.
console2.jpg finally4.jpg

By the way, the dash was always that brown colour. I would like to change it, but need to fix a couple of cracks first. Or install a dash cap.
 

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Thanks. So I asume you had to dye everything to get the color to match as the color of the dye probably did not match exactly? Or are you ok with having some slight color varation between original color and dyed color side by side?
 

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Discussion Starter #23
Very Cool! If I were going for a true to factory restore I would go with color matched dye from SEM for sure. The stuff I got was close enough. The original interior is already a rainbow of slightly different blues as it is.

I like that your Dash has a slightly different color. Kinda brings in the burl of the custom center console.

It turned out so well I am VERY tempted to change the interior color of my Land Rover. Currently it's tan, but I've always dreamed about a peanut butter or chocolate color interior!
 

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Thanks. So I asume you had to dye everything to get the color to match as the color of the dye probably did not match exactly? Or are you ok with having some slight color varation between original color and dyed color side by side?
It's true that because of age and fading, the colours were slightly different. Not enough to worry about, but I freshened up the lower dash pieces for that reason. It's so easy to do. I took everything off first. Then used some isopropyl alcohol to clean the old surface, then sprayed dye on. I think I used a foam brush to even out any runs or sagging of the coating. The dye is very easy to work with and seems to look better and better as it dries.

My seats were replaced a long time ago with leather of the original colour. The leather isn't an exact match either but probably wasn't, even when new.
 

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Discussion Starter #25
Another update.

Part of my project in the interior was updating the car stereo (my brother in law blew out the already aftermarket head unit and the speaker cones are deteriorated. While I was under the dash I found an alarm system that was confusing to say the least. I've never heard it operate, but based on the wiring it seems that if you had a switch turned on in the glove box and tried to start the car while the hood was open then a siren would go off? I ripped all that out. good riddance. One thing I did learn from the system was how to cleanly tap into the fuse panel.
1. remove the kick panel.
2. Use a heat gun on low to heat up all of the wires inside the fuse/relay area. Just enough so they are all pliable
3. Undo the two flat head screws holding in the fuse holder
4. pull the fuse panel up so that you have access to the backside.
5. You can now add new wires with ring connectors. I tapped into circuit #1 for constant and #3 for switched power to my new radio.

As long as I was digging in the wiring I decided I should at least leave some way to secure the car in cases where I need to park in public. I decided to add a kill switch to the Starter relay #4.
I pulled out the Relays #2 & 4 to get access. Then popped off the relay sockets. I tapped into the grounding pin #85 on the relay socket.

I don't have good photos of the finished product but I pulled the socket with brown wires out of the bundle and inserted a new wire. I used a socket connector I harvested from an old harness.
I used a male plug style wire terminal on the return and inserted it into the brown wire plug and taped it off inside the fuse box. This way i can return it to stock if needed without having to solder a new connection.

Everything worked perfectly when I was finished. With a switch in the glovebox turned off, the car will not start, just a bunch of clicks under the hood as if the battery is flat. Flip the switch on and everything is normal.

The ONE failure I had is that the tabs on the relay socket broke when re-inserting. It still works, but it's not secured as well as I would like.
Does anyone have a hookup for a new relay socket?!!!

 

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Is it one or both of these that you need? If so PM me and we'll get you set up.
I don't know what's more impressive, that you have an entire vault chock-full of spare parts or that you can actually lay your hands on whatever it is you're looking for. Either way, it's very good magic.
 

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Discussion Starter #31
Another Update. It's been a while. After finishing up the interior and working on the electrical I moved on to mechanical. Early this summer I did an epoxy floor in my garage and it made it VERY obvious where and what was leaking. Diff, Trans, RMS, & Power steering.

I removed the rear subframe, took apart the Differential and replaced the pinion and axle seals. New RTV on the cover. The old half shafts were looking pretty spent and did not seem to flex very freely so i ordered some new ones. Everything else is original parts, just decreased and hit everything with either aircraft stripper or chassis paint. Rear sub-frame is back in now. Followed these guides: https://www.benzworld.org/threads/differential-pinion-seal-replacement.1538505/

















Next steps were pulling the Trans, Power Steering box and power steering rack.So far I've got the input and output seals replaced. the trans pan gasket & filter replaced. Steering Gear and pump removed. I'll tackle the RMS before putting the trans back. Following this guide: https://www.benzworld.org/threads/w107-transmission-removal-for-dummies.2958890/








So now I have a question for the group before I waste a bunch of time, o-rings, and power steering fluid on this Vickers Power steering pump. How much float should the pulley shaft have in the pump. This one has ~6mm of movement in and out. Before removing the pulley it didn't have this much movement. Maybe the pully was riding against the front seal limiting the movement?






Thanks again for any input. The forums have been an incredible resource to get this far.
 

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I just came across your thread. You're making great progress. Your interior work turned out great, and your diving into the mechanical end tells me that your grandfather in-law's SL is in very good hands.
Body, and metal roof color codes are displayed on the metal data plates, so you should be able to determine the body, and metal roof colors when your 107 left the factory.
 

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Discussion Starter #35
Thanks for the support. Sorry I'm not posting step by step guides. Almost everything I've done has been documented better than I could ever do.

I decided to order another Vickers Power steering pump since the 6mm of float in the shaft seemed excessive and I'll want a backup when I inevitably destroy this one trying to pull it apart to figure out why. Best case I can fix one and sell the other.
 

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I have recently been tasked with storing my Father-in-laws SL that was purchased new by his dad in 1972. It is Horizon Blue with dark navy blue soft top, dark navy blue hardtop, & navy interior. Runs and drives great despite having 277,XXX miles on it.

List of to do's
  • Fix torn & faded carpet, cracked center console, ripped vinyl door cards, misc interior bits
  • Fix aftermarket stereo
  • fix burned out dash bulbs, broken tach, broken oil pressure gauge
  • repair rust on left front fender, in trunk
  • replace rear suspension bushings
  • rebuild steering rack
  • replace rear main seal, oil pan gasket
  • replace transmission pan gasket
  • Have it professionally painted
I'll keep this thread updated with progress and updates. I've already started on many of the above projects so I'll get photos and details added as I have time.
You need my whole car for $500, it is in New Mexico
 

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Discussion Starter #38
Another update. Everything is back in except the drive shaft. I've given it its first start and confirmed there are no longer any leaks from the trans, rear main seal, stearing box, or steering pump.

I was about to put the driveshaft back in and realized the center bushs were spent. Ordered new ones and they will be installed tomorrow so that I'm back on the road by the weekend.

Another thing i realized when working on the driveshaft. I made a MAJOR mistake by not marking the front and rear shaft alignment before removing them. Once I had them out, I noticed that there were some numbers stamped on each part, and I just assumed that aligning the numbers would keep my shaft balanced. (the marks were added by me after the shafts were out of the car).




Then i kept reading and seeing that driveshafts should be marked with a "=" and a "-" and older shafts didn't have marks. I also read that the front and rear flex disk Ys normally do NOT align with one another. Mine did align when i matched them up by just the numbers. Knowing all this i decided to get the shafts balanced. I called around to every shop within 30mi of Boston with a driveshaft balancing rig and they all told me that they could not balance flexdisk type shafts... great.

So I decided to tackle this myself. I knew i wouldn't need to weld any new balancing weights to the shaft since it was balanced before I removed it. I just needed to find the right spline orientation that resulted in the least vibration. I didn't want to do this on the car because it is not easy to remove the shaft and adjust the spline 27 times and record vibration so I would need a test bench and a way to measure vibration.



For measurement I used the iOS App "Vibration Analyzer". Set to measure Z axis vibration and X axis RPM, with fixed X axis values and a Max value display so that I could easily compare measurements for each spline.

Mounting the center bearing was pretty easy, everything was just screwed to a 2x6 with 2x4's to standoff the ends and the center.


the free spinning end was held with a 7/8 deep socket inserted into the end of the shaft (with the bushes removed). I wrapped the socket with duct tape to get the right diameter and tapped it in so it was snug. then I used some old bicycle BB30 Bottom bracket bearings around the socket. I chiseled a small notch for the bearings to rest in and held them in place with some plastic pluming hanger. The shaft spun very smooth and was very solid in this mount.



Next was to get the shaft spinning. I used a 22mm impact socket with 1 wrap of duct tape then hammered into where the bush would normally go. This way I could use a 1/2 socket drive in a drill to run my rig. This was chucked into a HF drill that runs at 1200rpm. Not exactly highway speed but enough to get a picture of the vibration.


I wrapped a piece of masking tape around the front shaft and marked and numbered all the splines. I tried to keep the rig with the exact same setup each time to get clean readings. I even marked a spot on the board where i would set my phone to pickup readings. Here's the progress as I got close and closer to the sweet spot.











This all worked great. And even better news, the number markings I found originally actually were the best alignment for the shafts. Hope this helps for your home driveshaft balancing needs.
 

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Amazing work! Your Grandpa in Law would be proud of you!

Just back from a short trip in our 350SL. Still puts a smile on my face! My wife pointed out that the only blemish is a crack in the dash. Been dragging my feet on that - To repair cracks in-situ and then paint entire dash. Or buy a dash skin and either leave it black or paint to match original.
 

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I always procrastinate on the shit jobs too MBG. The problem is they usually just get worse. If the crack is still small a vinyl welder might be able to fix it in situ. Dash out is a giant PITA. Putting it back is even worse:).Funny how wives can point out little things that are really humungous!
 
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