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1980 Mercedes 240D, 1988 Acura Legend Coupe 5MT
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Discussion Starter #1
Hello forum members,

This is my first post here. I am doing some work on my bro's Benz and came here to get some tips/advice form the pros. It is a golden brown 1980 240D with the 4spd auto trans. Only 168K miles on the clock. It is a great car and am just doing some routine maintenance on it. I have a red 1988 Acura Legend coupe which is a joy to drive since it is a five speed manual. Forums are nothing new to me since I am super moderator on the Legend forum and AcuraWorld. I assume this one is run by autoguide. With either Nadeem or Dwayn as the reps, correct?

I am going to do a brake bleed on the old benz within the next few days. I believe these cars use DOT3 but it didn't explicitly say so in the manual. The brake fluid reservoir is puzzling me. It seems to have a few different chambers in it. I was evacuating the old fluid out with a syringe and noticed that there was fluid in there that I couldn't get out. Can someone explain this to me?

Thanks in advance
 

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W123 230E, W140 S320, W202 C220
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34 Posts
Hi and Welcome!

The Fluid resevoir is broken up in two parts (For dual line braking redundancy). If it is a manual (Stick shift), it will have another chamber for the clutch.

Regards
 

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Premium Member
99 SLK230 Kompressor, 5 Speed Manual
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1,117 Posts
Previous posters seemed to answer your questions well.

My comment here is to offer kudo's for your flushing brakes. Many people don't understand the value of doing this frequently. Flushing brakes THOROUGHLY annually only costs about $5 a year and will virtually eliminate hydraulic problems.

I personally use the economical partially synthetic Valvoline or Prestone fluids with great results. As an example, my '88 300E with over a half million kilometers has seen annual brake flushes and has NEVER required master cylinder, caliper or slave cylinder (it's a manual transmission car) attention. I would say that $5 a year has been pretty good payback. Even for 22 years of cost at about $110, almost ANY hydraulic component failure would have cost that much plus the inconvenience of having the car briefly out of action.

Hope this helps.
 

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1980 Mercedes 240D, 1988 Acura Legend Coupe 5MT
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13 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Wow thanks for the fast responses. I bought a quart of prestone DOT3 brake fluid. I figured that would be enough. So how do I remove the fluid from the other chamber in the reservoir and fill it back up?

And Larry, that reminds me that I have to change out my leaking clutch master cylinder in my Acura. It it pretty much unheard of for the brake components to last that long. That just goes to show that maintenance is key.
 

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1967 300
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494 Posts
Wow thanks for the fast responses. I bought a quart of prestone DOT3 brake fluid. I figured that would be enough. So how do I remove the fluid from the other chamber in the reservoir and fill it back up?

And Larry, that reminds me that I have to change out my leaking clutch master cylinder in my Acura. It it pretty much unheard of for the brake components to last that long. That just goes to show that maintenance is key.
You will need to have someone pump the brakes while you open the bleeder screw on each caliper starting with the one that is farthest away from the reservoir.

If you have a power bleeder that will speed it up. Also if you have a turkey baster that will also help you pull fluid out faster. My mity vac came with a container that easily lets me siphon the fluid out and into a container.
 

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1959 220S cabriolet, 1983 240D original owner, 1999 E300 turbo diesel, 1988 560SL, 2003 SLK320
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3,513 Posts
Pressure bleeder is really the way to go. In any case make sure you fill up the front reservoir to almost overflowing so that the fluid will pour over the dam between the reservoirs and fill up the rear portion of the reservoir.
 

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1980 Mercedes 240D, 1988 Acura Legend Coupe 5MT
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Discussion Starter #8
Pressure bleeder is really the way to go. In any case make sure you fill up the front reservoir to almost overflowing so that the fluid will pour over the dam between the reservoirs and fill up the rear portion of the reservoir.
This is what I was looking for. Thanks for the info everyone.

This really is a good forum.
 

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Premium Member
99 SLK230 Kompressor, 5 Speed Manual
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1,117 Posts
Wow thanks for the fast responses. I bought a quart of prestone DOT3 brake fluid. I figured that would be enough. So how do I remove the fluid from the other chamber in the reservoir and fill it back up?

And Larry, that reminds me that I have to change out my leaking clutch master cylinder in my Acura. It it pretty much unheard of for the brake components to last that long. That just goes to show that maintenance is key.
It is at best difficult to remove the rear fluid from the top. Just get out as much as you can and start bleeding. Don't be afraid to use the whole quart to bleed/flush the entire clutch and brake system with whatever method you have available. The two man method will work fine if you don't have a pressure bleeder. It will work fine for the clutch if you're just flushing a non leaking system.

Yes, if you THOROUGHLY flush the brakes on any car on an annual basis, cylinders and calipers can last virtually forever. I'm not in salt country, so if the salt roads heavily in your area, there might still be maintenance required at some point.

Hope this helps.
 

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1980 Mercedes 240D, 1988 Acura Legend Coupe 5MT
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Discussion Starter #10
Just changed out the fluid today. Everything went smoothly even though this was the first time I ever did a brake bleed. It almost took the whole quart of brake fluid.

That fluid was VERY DIRTY. I'm guessing it has been at least 5 years since it was last changed. Went for a test drive and the brakes felt great.

Thanks again for the help. Hope everyone has great Christmas.
 
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