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Discussion Starter #21 (Edited)
And some more.

The Orange Cab without the doors and the green sticker behind the door opening shows what could be a hint of a dimple...on a regular cab.

I'm guessing that the cabs with the lowered lights might not be able to be tilted quite as far as some of the cabs shown, at least without removing the turn indicators. It looks like they are in a spot where they might crush against the bumper.

Then, you might be able to join the club and get dimples with the lower turn indicators.
 

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Discussion Starter #22 (Edited)
With the production of the new UHE, the turn indicators have moved to the bumper, and I think that the fenders look better and cleaner without them, high or low.

They also have re-designed the hinge pivots for the cab tilting, which are more stout, and a different profile.The pin on the cab looks about the same. The jack for tilting the cab has evolved as well, and is now a rotary crank hydraulic system, up and down.

It is also now mounted on the right front corner, where you might at least be able to see the steering linkage while lowering the cab. I doubt you'd want to reach for it, putting your body across the chassis, under the cab, but you could see it and communicate with your mate who was guiding it into alignment. It is better than standing far away at the right rear corner of a DOKA.

The square cab is now at least 44 years old, which I think has to be the longest running UNIMOG variant by far.

The 411's ran from about 1946 into the 60's, the 404 from the mid-50's into the 70's, the 406's ran from the early 60's into the 80's.
The other types all had fairly short runs by comparison - 417,418, UX100's, U20's, etc.

Hey Trev, if you'd like to break this whole dimple damage discussion off into it's own thread, it might make sense. That way it could be found without the Dutch Doka title masking it.
 

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Couch says he never lifts the Doka cabs using the tilt mechanism. He always lifts them with an overhead gantry by both of the lifting rings behind the cab. Doing it this way removes some of the weight the higher you go but also evenly disperses the load on the front pivots. He'd have more trust in the Benz option if it had a hydraulic ram for each side. The one arm push-up is a killer.

He also cuts off the lower bracket for the lift cylinder since he doesn't trust it anyways. One less belly obstacle too.

Just passing it along...Matt
 

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I sold the cab lift mechanism off mine. I use my crane pulling from the center of a chain between the two loops on the back of the cab. As documented, my cab has the crease on the drivers front panel. The dent couldn't be explained by the previous owner. It is more stable and doesn't seem to tweek the cab. I do believe Truktor is on to the mystery.....
Chas
 

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Discussion Starter #25
I do think that the cutout for the turn indicator plays a role, since the dimples appear right next to the light.

The damage either occurs during lifting, when that upper part of the front fender is in compression, or it possibly occurs during lowering, when that panel is in tension, a condition which might be magnified if the cab winds up hung up on the steering shaft, with the hydraulic jacking arm relaxed and no longer providing any support.

It could happen in either scenario, but I tend to think that the steering shaft not being aligned might be the culprit. When lowering the cab by yourself, you are moving from the Right rear of the cab at the jacking station to the Left front of the cab to guide the steering shaft into alignment. You can think you have it all set, but still be off just enough.

I did not even think about the dimple situation when I was doing this, nor about loading and stressing the sheetmetal if I lowered the cab past the point where the jack was providing any support.

I was careful, and moved from one spot to another, lowering the cab incrementally, but I still wound up lowering it when it was not properly aligned (one time) and as I relaxed the jack I noticed that the cab was not moving.

I think I dodged a bullet.

The whole mystery of how that dent appeared on the Green DOKA - well, I never thought about it in terms of lifting the cab until this thread unraveled. Now, I'm convinced that is when it happened, and the shop that did the lifting never noticed it.

It was really MMThomas' question that started the ball rolling.

Now, it seems to make sense, and I'll probably use an overhead hoist like Chas does when I have to lift the cab.



On a side note - when bolting the cab back to the cab mounts when the cab was lowered, the rear center bolt did not want to line up, even though the two front bolts were not tightened down.

The trick is to put the rear bolt in place, even though it won't thread into the mount, and drive the truck around the block. Now, with any luck, it will thread right in, and you can tighten all of the bolts down. I happened upon the solution when I could not think of anything else. When I was communicating this with Neil at MEREX afterwards, he said something like 'Oh, yeah, That is the trick."

So, that is the trick.
 
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