Mercedes-Benz Forum banner
1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
1985 300CD, 1985.5 Porsche 944, 1969 Triumph TR6, 1998 Land Rover Discovery I, 1992 Volvo 240
Joined
·
1,797 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
My 1984 production Euro 280CE 4-speed spent its entire life until recently baking in the hot Texas sun, which has taken a serious toll on the paint. Stopped at my local body shop who has done total repaints for me on a 1969 Triumph TR6 and a 1985 BMW E30 and they said the car would have to go down to bare metal, which is what I assumed. They said that the whole car would be sanded down to bare metal and then epoxied and painted, with lots of sanding and blocking in the process.

I rationalize the repaint given that the car is a Euro spec, 4-speed, 280CE with 43,260 documented miles (gotta be pretty rare) and only two previous owners that actually worked with each other, the original owner a Doctor and the second owner a medical co-worker.

The Good:
  • They use Standox paint.
  • I can strip the car of all its glass, bumpers, lights, grill, trim, etc to save myself some money.
  • If going this far I may even pull the engine and have the engine compartment sprayed.
  • The car is white, so more forgiving.
  • Being from Texas there is zero rust to repair.
  • No noticeable dents of dings, though I am sure there may be some that are discovered during prepping the car for paint.

Anyone been down this road recently and if so, what was the cost? Would $10,000 be a reasonable expectation?

To give you an idea of what I am dealing with, this is what the paint looks like over the entire car.

Grille Hood Automotive lighting Car Motor vehicle
Sky Automotive design Twig Plant Branch
Automotive parking light Automotive tire Automotive lighting Hood Grille
 

·
Registered
W123 300CD, W123 300TD, W202 C250D Turbo
Joined
·
773 Posts
I did a coupe last year - similar fashion.

Stripped it myself - Front and rear windows out as well as sunroof and seals. Didn't do the engine out though as it wasn't a new colour and the engine bay was fine.

Plastic bead blasted the paint off - So I ended up with a bare metal carcus that needed to be etch primed quick as that metal was begging for humidity to create surface rust.
Supplied replacement doors as there were lots of dings in the original doors.

With the pain off, all previous owners sins were exposed. Nothing major

Panel beaten then undercoated then oven cooked painted.

Re-assembled myself (except windscreens as I am paranoid about cracking them and it's cheap to get someone to slip them in).

Your budget was about right

I hope you stay safe on your deployment
 

·
Registered
1985 300CD, 1985.5 Porsche 944, 1969 Triumph TR6, 1998 Land Rover Discovery I, 1992 Volvo 240
Joined
·
1,797 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I would venture to strip the car myself by sanding, but would be very concerned with flash rust. That and I wouldn't want to spray anything, even a primer, that could potentially affect the final paint job. As much as $10,000.00 is a good bit of money, this is one area where I don't want to cheap out. I got a "economical" paint job from a local body guy that does work out of his garage, no spray booth like the other shop, on a W126 300SD and I could see sanding marks, fish eyes in the paint and "ghost" images everywhere he had to prime a spot. I just think he didn't care and used inexpensive products and not enough of them and I got what I paid for. Live and learn. I ended up selling the car just because it drove me crazy every time I looked at the paint job. I will recover from the cost of a professional job sooner than I will having to look at an inferior job every time I drive the car.

What's the saying, Pay Once, Cry Once?
 

·
Registered
1985 300CD, 1985.5 Porsche 944, 1969 Triumph TR6, 1998 Land Rover Discovery I, 1992 Volvo 240
Joined
·
1,797 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·

·
Registered
W123 300CD, W123 300TD, W202 C250D Turbo
Joined
·
773 Posts
I would venture to strip the car myself by sanding, but would be very concerned with flash rust.
The first nut'n'bolt resto I did was on a 62 Plymouth Valiant (affectionally referred to as a road toad because of the styling, sold as a Chrysler Valiant out here) 25 years ago. My mentor (and very good friend who runs his own workshop) made me use paint stripper, a scrapper and steel wool to get the paint off and polish the bare metal panel. Once a panel was done, you spray over with etch primer - it's a very thin coating that your beater will remove in 2 seconds flat and not affect the job they do. You spray it to prevent the surface rust. I was made to do it this way to appreciate the effort needed but also ensure I would never park it in a supermarket where shopping trolleys and / or your neighbours car door will ding it. I still own the car today and he was right, it's never been anywhere near a crowded car park. If I was doing another resto of that style and had time, I would do it that way again to save on panel beater costs.
 

·
Registered
1982 300D Turbodiesel (US Spec)
Joined
·
375 Posts
Can’t say anything about the cost but after looking at the pictures, if there are several spots with sort of checking/cracking issue, then is a good idea to remove all the paint. My car has the same issue in the front passenger door and my father (who worked in body shops for years) told me the only way to properly fix that is a bare metal repaint.

If you just sand it down, apply primer and paint over that, even if it looks smooth, chances are the new paint is going to crack just as bad or even worse.

The car is white, so more forgiving.
Experience tells me otherwise. Under certain light they show imperfections even worse than dark or metallic colors, especially wavy panels or poorly prepped surfaces in which filler was applied. Fortunately that won't be an issue in your car since is low miles and has never been hit.
 

·
Registered
1985 300CD, 1985.5 Porsche 944, 1969 Triumph TR6, 1998 Land Rover Discovery I, 1992 Volvo 240
Joined
·
1,797 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Though much later, my first car at 18, not counting a 1972 FJ40 Landcruiser that never made it on the road, was a 1982 Dodge Aspen. I loved the 225 slant six.

The entire paint job is cracked, some places more than others, but enough that the entire car will have to have its original paint stripped. My body guy did say years ago they used chemical strippers, but with the newer more environmentally friendly products on the market today he said sanding with 80 grit is easier. I will ask if they would let me sand the car and as long as I use the same primer that the shop uses, I wouldn't think there would be any compatibility issues. If I am going all out, I would like to remove the hood, boot lid, fenders, windscreen, back window, etc. and give the car as proper a paint job as possible.

While the engine compartment is clean, minus needing a new battery tray, it just doesn't shine like new paint anymore. And with the motor out I could powder coat the air cleaner, have the exhaust manifolds ceramic coated, and just give everything a good detailing.

Wheel Tire Car Land vehicle Vehicle
Car Motor vehicle Hood Automotive design Automotive lighting
 

·
Premium Member
'08 BMW 750LI, '10 Ford Expedition
Joined
·
398 Posts
Had my 82 coupe resprayed with Glasurit about two years ago.
No bare metal strip down but glass, fenders, hood & deck lid removed. I took off the old trim & reinstalled the new trim. No DIY sanding. Total was about $5k.

Certainly, if everything below the paint is cracked it would seemingly require a bare metal repaint. If not, I’ve always been told to leave the materials below the paint due to the many layers of protectant and the quality of materials.

Keep us posted.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Doni

·
Registered
1985 300CD, 1985.5 Porsche 944, 1969 Triumph TR6, 1998 Land Rover Discovery I, 1992 Volvo 240
Joined
·
1,797 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I have heard that as well. I guess the only way to see how deep the cracking goes is to sand an area.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Doni

·
Registered
1985 300CD, 1985.5 Porsche 944, 1969 Triumph TR6, 1998 Land Rover Discovery I, 1992 Volvo 240
Joined
·
1,797 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I went to my body shop yesterday and they said if I take everything off the car, bumpers, mirrors, badging, moldings, lights, grill, front and rear glass, etc, the cost to strip and repaint the car would be around $6,000.00. I have had two cars painted by this shop in the past and they do very nice work. Paint used is Standox and I even have a good relationship with the painter.

I feel this is a very reasonable price.
 

·
Registered
1989 W124 260E
Joined
·
4,037 Posts
I coated the whole body work of my Sunbeam Alpine with Zinc Plate .It took a long time to do this , as the zinc plate only came in 500ml spray rattle cans .At the time i could not get ZP to use in my spray gun Then gentle rub down with 12000 wet and dry paper .Took me a whole week to do the first coat on to the car body that was just bare metal.
 

·
Registered
W123 300CD, W123 300TD, W202 C250D Turbo
Joined
·
773 Posts
I assume that is inside door jams and under bonnet ? Complete undercoat and spray (not over spraying the exiting paint) Does that include knocking out any dints as well ? The hardest part is finding a shop you are happy with, which looks like you have done. I'd be happy with $6K.
 

·
Registered
1985 300CD, 1985.5 Porsche 944, 1969 Triumph TR6, 1998 Land Rover Discovery I, 1992 Volvo 240
Joined
·
1,797 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
That does include the door jams, the underside of the hood, fixing any little dents, which there aren't many and doing it right. They are very picky about removing glass and trim so there is no risk of overspray no matter how careful you try to be while taping things off. They will strip, prime, block sand and repeat until smooth. They then will apply a sealer followed by a basecoat/clearcoat. All Standox products.

My only reservation with the coupes is removing some of the trim, especially the upper trim along the roof drip edge. I have attempted this on a parts car and not especially easy to do without bending it.
 

·
Registered
W123 300CD, W123 300TD, W202 C250D Turbo
Joined
·
773 Posts
The upper trim is a supper slow and cautious task and look for all the screws because there are lots of them. There are two layers of it as well, that which holds the door / window seals and then the roof channel.

I would be happy with the price quoted for the work you are getting done
 

·
Premium Member
'08 BMW 750LI, '10 Ford Expedition
Joined
·
398 Posts
Thought I would pass this along:

Took the 1970 250C to my body shop yesterday.
The passenger rocker needs to be replaced due to corrosion. The owner said he had no idea when he could even take it. He has two "projects" in house right now that he's had way too long.
The shop owner referred me to someone else.
Said the insurance business is so good (last year was his best year ever) he can't keep up. Two other reputable shops in town have closed due to no qualified labor.
Coupled with the fact there are no new cars available, people fixing up what they have and total values from collisions have risen 30% over what they were due to increased values of autos.
So, I decided to wait out this crazy time out we're living in as my work is not necessity nor is it getting worse.
I'll hold out for lower rates...

Although, I do think your quote of $6k is fair. If mine was $5k almost three years ago $6k is not bad. Also, I'm in the deep south in a town of roughly 190k people- cost of living is pretty low...
 

·
Premium Member
'08 BMW 750LI, '10 Ford Expedition
Joined
·
398 Posts
I was looking to get the 85 couple painted this year and have another guy who does a great job but is "under the radar".
Going to take the 85 to him for a quote soon.
He didn't want to take on the 250C.
Will let you know how the quote comes back.
 

·
Registered
1985 300CD, 1985.5 Porsche 944, 1969 Triumph TR6, 1998 Land Rover Discovery I, 1992 Volvo 240
Joined
·
1,797 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
My guy is booked until April, but that will give me time to sell one of my other 7 cars. The Mercedes being one that will not be sold and kept long term.

I like that they use a good quality German paint. When I asked why, the owner told me that they just like the quality over some other brands. It says a lot to me when a shop could be using lesser quality materials to make more money but chooses not to.
 

·
Premium Member
'08 BMW 750LI, '10 Ford Expedition
Joined
·
398 Posts
My guy is booked until April, but that will give me time to sell one of my other 7 cars. The Mercedes being one that will not be sold and kept long term.

I like that they use a good quality German paint. When I asked why, the owner told me that they just like the quality over some other brands. It says a lot to me when a shop could be using lesser quality materials to make more money but chooses not to.
Very smart.
When I requested Glasurit I think the price increased by $800+/-.
Once the car was complete my guy said you know, this car will never have to be painted again.
That's why you do it right the first time!!
 

·
Registered
1985 300CD, 1985.5 Porsche 944, 1969 Triumph TR6, 1998 Land Rover Discovery I, 1992 Volvo 240
Joined
·
1,797 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I think I am fortunate that my shop uses Standox paint. Most body shops like to spray what they are used to spraying and even if they are great at all the prep, may not be comfortable if you ask them to spray a different brand of paint.
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top