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1996 210.020
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If you have a warning for brake pads, replace the sensors. If you have no warning, you might want to inspect them to ensure that the insulation is completely intact and pliable.

If there is any question, replace them as they are not expensive.

And skip Ebay sellers for Mercedes-Benz parts!
 

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1998 Black E320
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Discussion Starter #3
If you have a warning for brake pads, replace the sensors. If you have no warning, you might want to inspect them to ensure that the insulation is completely intact and pliable.

If there is any question, replace them as they are not expensive.

And skip Ebay sellers for Mercedes-Benz parts!
why should i skip these sellers? is it the parts, service or price?
 

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why should i skip these sellers? is it the parts, service or price?
Parts and service, mostly. As a buyer, you have essentially no recourse with Ebay transactions. The whole deal is highly skewed to help the sellers.

While it's not the case with this seller, most of them have quite high shipping costs while other suppliers charge nothing for orders over $50.

If you keep buying Benz parts on Ebay, you will be burned sooner or later. For me, it was the first (and last) purchase. Brake pads may be a different story though, since you are looking for aftermarket parts in the first place.
 

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Hey, sjc. I'm up north of you, welcome to the forum.

Plus one to Matt's advice. There is a good DIY with pictures that shows the sensor. They are very inexpensive, personally I would change them irrespective of the light, but once you have it, new ones are indicated.

I also would not buy anything meaningful for the car from ebay. While there are legit sellers that otherwise have a business, it can be hard to separate the wheat from the chaff.

And even if you stick with what you think are brand-name parts, on ebay they are too often fake, re-boxed etc.

If you don't want OEM then do some searches here for good aftermarket brands. I have been impressed with the Axxis deluxe plus. Be aware that you won't improve overall performance, but you can cut down on brake dust.

Be sure to measure your rotors as they are soft and wear out, if you are close on the thickness them replace them. Again, OEM work great and are affordable from several trusted online sources, including autohausaz.com and germanstar.net.

Take care and enjoy the ride,
Greg
 

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E320/E250 Bluetec Ford F350 6.7l
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You can go to local dealership and gut burned financially ALL the time.
The linked seller has over 51 thousands transactions on ebay and only few dissatisfy customers. I guess local mechanics can't even get close to it.
Coming to the sensors -they are reusable if not wear out too much. When the pads get thin, the sensor wire wears with them. Meaning when you drive for too long with brake light on, the sensors might not be usable. MB is pretty Conservative on warnings. I did drive over 2000 miles with the light on and still has some pads remaining on the metal plate.
 

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1998 Black E320
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Discussion Starter #7
Sensor sound like a good idea... I dont really trust ebay but im very cousious.... i bought aftermarket headlights and learned my lesson. prices are good on ebay... Matt thanks for the advice... Greg thanks for the links.. thanks to you too Kajtek
 

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Just did my brakes couple days ago and it requires 3 sensors(1 for rear, 2 for front) which cost $1 each from autohausaz.com.
 

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Hey, sjc.

FCP Groton has been around for a while and at one time I thought about buying a MAF from them...but I was a bit gun shy.

Assuming they are legit and are the pads are genuine, you won't beat that price on the pads. $11 more and you get the sensors with them at some other sellers, which is closing in on what the sensors will probably cost you if you order them by themselves (and have to pay shipping) or get them from the stealer. Either way, 51,000 people are satisfied with Groton, so that says a lot.

In any event, the Akebonos are very popular ceramic pads. They are harder pads, so they will shorten the life of your rotors, if that is a concern.

Additionally, if you are only doing front pads (or rears), conventional wisdom is to not vary pad compounds. In other words, if you only want to change the fronts, then stick with what is on the rear, or else change all four at once.

While I'm thinking of it, have you checked your pads to see whether it's the fronts or rears that are worn?

Take care and enjoy the ride,
Greg
 

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1998 Black E320
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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks Greg..... Im about to order right now... I checked my brakes and the front ones are gone. Back ones are still good. So were would you guys get the sensor?
 

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1994 E320 Wagon,1999 E320 Wagon,2000 E 320 Wagon, MGB Track/Rally, ,1988 300E ,more....
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autohausaz.com

are the rotors still good?oem rotors autohausaz.com.
Akebono pads tirerack.com.
kroil parts house or kano labs:D
ohlord:bowdown:
 

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Thanks Greg..... Im about to order right now... I checked my brakes and the front ones are gone. Back ones are still good. So were would you guys get the sensor?
Hey, sjc.

Everything I'm writing below is just a rehash of what I already said, stated differently.

I would still caution you against only changing the front pads to those with a dramatically different pad compound. If you want the Akebonos on the front, then change the rears now, don't wait for them to wear out.

As has been repeated, be sure to check your rotors. Measure them for thickness and ensure they are not close to, at or below minimum thickness before you change pads. MB rotors are softer and wear out more quickly than many other makes; don't trust how they "look" but instead put a micrometer on them to be sure.

If your rotors are run out, then order new ones from autohausaz.com and since your total will be over $50 it's free shipping, and then go ahead and order the sensors from them at the same time.

If your rotors still measure acceptably good, then just head over to Smythe and pick up the sensors there. The discounted prices from online sources will otherwise be eaten up by shipping.

Take care and enjoy the ride,
Greg
 

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2001 SLK 320(217K Miles), 2002 E320 Special Edition(183K Miles)
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My Akebonos had sensors included without even ordering them.
 

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2001 SLK 320(217K Miles), 2002 E320 Special Edition(183K Miles)
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Hey, sjc.


I would still caution you against only changing the front pads to those with a dramatically different pad compound. If you want the Akebonos on the front, then change the rears now, don't wait for them to wear out.
I'm going to differ from Greg here. Unless you plan to track (race) the car, you would not notice any difference with different compounds in the back and front. The rear brakes do very little work in any case and the ABS will take care of any differences in severe conditions.

(Damn Kajtek, why are we always in the minority? :D At least I'm not as radical as you. :D:D )
 

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My Akebonos had sensors included without even ordering them.
Yeah, that's one of the things that made me question the deal since every known source I checked for the Akebonos includes the sensors...yet another reason I don't buy meaningful things from ebay. The ten or twelve bucks saved will be eaten up by sourcing the sensors elsewhere. To each their own, however.
 

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I'm going to differ from Greg here. Unless you plan to track (race) the car, you would not notice any difference with different compounds in the back and front. The rear brakes do very little work in any case and the ABS will take care of any differences in severe conditions.

(Damn Kajtek, why are we always in the minority? :D At least I'm not as radical as you. :D:D )
Well, I guess we'll have to differ. If ABS and track use were the only issue then you could also put different pads not only on different axles, but also on different wheels, or even mix and match on the same caliper.

Every pad compound has specific characteristics: better hot, better cold, better wet, better dry, different ideal temperature ranges for maximum performance, and wider temperature ranges for the optimum performance. Thus, such varied conditions will expose potentially radical differences in pad performance, which could negatively affect handling in a (even non-panic) stop & swerve scenario, potentially causing the driver to lose control. While that is less likely to happen with ABS, ESP and the other "big brother" features on the newer MB models, it nevertheless remains a potential. (And it is possible if the differences in the conditions and pad compounds are dramatic enough, it could confuse the feedback systems such that they might respond in a way that the driver might not expect, understand or appreciate.)

Now, while you or I or anyone else might weigh those considerations and decide the benefits outweigh the risks, suggesting instead that there are no risks to the public at large and to plow ahead without reservation is possibly not the most meaningful advice to share. I freely admit I tend to be rather conservative with such things on the forum, but I don't ever want to have to worry about someone using my advice to their potential downfall (hence there are sometimes things I do that I don't post about:rolleyes:). And it's probably obvious at this point, but I can't envision circumstances that would cause me to change pad compounds on my car without doing all four at the same time (and I'm not speaking hypothetically, for I was indeed in our OP's situation with worn-out fronts and quite good backs and changed all four to the Axxis pads). I'd rather toss out partially used brake pads that have no significant value than accept the potential risks.

Take care and enjoy the ride,
Greg
 

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1998 Black E320
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Discussion Starter #17
Well, I guess we'll have to differ. If ABS and track use were the only issue then you could also put different pads not only on different axles, but also on different wheels, or even mix and match on the same caliper.

Every pad compound has specific characteristics: better hot, better cold, better wet, better dry, different ideal temperature ranges for maximum performance, and wider temperature ranges for the optimum performance. Thus, such varied conditions will expose potentially radical differences in pad performance, which could negatively affect handling in a (even non-panic) stop & swerve scenario, potentially causing the driver to lose control. While that is less likely to happen with ABS, ESP and the other "big brother" features on the newer MB models, it nevertheless remains a potential. (And it is possible if the differences in the conditions and pad compounds are dramatic enough, it could confuse the feedback systems such that they might respond in a way that the driver might not expect, understand or appreciate.)

Now, while you or I or anyone else might weigh those considerations and decide the benefits outweigh the risks, suggesting instead that there are no risks to the public at large and to plow ahead without reservation is possibly not the most meaningful advice to share. I freely admit I tend to be rather conservative with such things on the forum, but I don't ever want to have to worry about someone using my advice to their potential downfall (hence there are sometimes things I do that I don't post about:rolleyes:). And it's probably obvious at this point, but I can't envision circumstances that would cause me to change pad compounds on my car without doing all four at the same time (and I'm not speaking hypothetically, for I was indeed in our OP's situation with worn-out fronts and quite good backs and changed all four to the Axxis pads). I'd rather toss out partially used brake pads that have no significant value than accept the potential risks.

Take care and enjoy the ride,
Greg

Thanks Greg...I understood.....
I will never predict the braking with different brake compounds....... My decision was made to change only the fronts because of my budget..... (guess its not good to be cheap when you own a MB)... other thoughts on mind now would be the sensor, ( because in the ebay page where i bought them it says no sensor included yet the pictures shows two sensors) and now the rotors..... I think i still have stock ones but i will check if still good.... does anybody have examples of a worn out rotor vs. a new. maybe you cant tell at naked eye........ i have 93k miles... should my rotors be good for now?
 

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Thanks Greg...I understood.....
I will never predict the braking with different brake compounds....... My decision was made to change only the fronts because of my budget..... (guess its not good to be cheap when you own a MB)... other thoughts on mind now would be the sensor, ( because in the ebay page where i bought them it says no sensor included yet the pictures shows two sensors) and now the rotors..... I think i still have stock ones but i will check if still good.... does anybody have examples of a worn out rotor vs. a new. maybe you cant tell at naked eye........ i have 93k miles... should my rotors be good for now?
Hey, sjc. There are places you can be cheap, but brakes (and wheels and tires) is not one I'd personally recommend as a failure or weakness here can do more than just cost you money.

On line you can buy both front and rear OEM pads for slightly more than the cost of the Akebono fronts, so if you want to save money I'd respectfully suggest you just buy new OEM front pads and sensors and just live with the dust. MB brakes are incredibly well designed and robust, so there is absolutely nothing wrong with a stock setup. By the time the fronts wear out again, you'll be ready for rear pads anyway, then you can decide how you want to proceed and maybe money issues will be better then.

However....we still have the rotor issue. There is absolutely no way to tell if your rotors are okay simply by looking. (There are ways to tell they are NOT okay, but that is only half the question). If the rotor has grooves or you feel the pedal pulse, that is not okay. If it has a ridge around the outside or inside edge (the shoulder that can form where the pad no longer contacts the rotor as it sweeps it) that is not okay. But even if they pass the simple look test, that doesn't tell you that they are okay.

Typically MB rotors make it through 2 -- or perhaps three -- sets of pads. At your mileage mark you could be on the second or third set of pads, depending of course on how the car has been driven. If you don't have complete maintenance records then you can't discern anything more than that. So you have no choice but to put a micrometer on the rotors and check them. Micrometers are cheap, so pick one up; you don't want a dial-caliper because that will catch the outer edge, you need a classic micrometer like this:
(well, this one is not exactly classic as it is digital, making it easier to read, but that makes it a bit more expensive at $20 online from Harbor Freight). Pull the tire and measure the rotor thickness. Write it down and then turn the rotor, looking at the perimeter of it. Someplace on it you'll find a stamping that looks something like "MIN THICK" followed by numbers, which will indicate the minimum thickness for the rotor. If you are at or below this spec, you must replace the rotor. Moreover, if you are very close (a couple of thousandths) to this spec you also must replace the rotor, because it will wear below spec during the life of the new pads (in other words, you never want to be using rotors that are below the minimum spec).

So, to summarize, were I you and looking to maximize my dollars: I'd call an Autozone and see if they also lend measuring tools, such as a micrometer. If not I'd purchase an inexpensive one to use. I would measure the rotors against the stamped specification on them. If I need rotors, I'd order them, the locking screws, the sensors, 2 packets of brake paste and OEM front pads from Autohausaz and enjoy the service and free shipping. If the rotors measure out okay I would purchase from the same vendor OEM front pads, sensors and 2 packs of brake paste to hit the magical $50 price and still enjoy the free shipping.

Hope that helps make a bit of sense of it all. :)

Take care and enjoy the ride,
Greg
 

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1998 Black E320
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Discussion Starter #19 (Edited)
Greg......
You persuaded me to change my mind on my brake setup. The problem is that i WAS looking for a deal rather than quality. I have already ordered the Akebono pads and i expect to put them on asap because im afraid that i will have to resurface my rotors if i wait. Since im advised the these pads go quicker than oem ones... i will test and use them to the end. I hope they will terminate the same time as the ones currently on my rears so i change them at the same time. I will test my rotors with a micrometer regardless... It might give me a peace of mind or just something to think about. I plan to change rotors next brake change. Im really interested in that oem setup you recommended.... Thanks. I will wait this time but i am well informed for next time...
 

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Greg......
You persuaded me to change my mind on my brake setup. The problem is that i was looking for a deal rather than quality. I have already ordered the Akebono pads and i expect to put them on asap because im afraid that i will have to resurface my rotors if i wait. Since im advised the these pads go quiquer than oem i will test and use them to the end. I hope they will terminate the same time as the ones currently on my rears so i change them at the same time. I will test my rotors regardless... It might give me a peace of mind or just something to think about. I plan to change rotors next brake change. Im really interested in that oem setup you recommended.... Thanks. I will wait this time but i am well informed for next time...
Good luck, sjc. As you noted do be sure to check your rotors. And don't worry about resurfacing them, because MB specifies that they are not to be resurfaced, ever. So just visual inspection (yes/no) and then mic them to be sure, then proceed if they're good on both tests.

My understanding from myriad posts is that the Akebono pads are significantly harder than OEM compounds and will last longer, but wear the rotors faster. So you might have them longer than you're thinking. Which also makes it doubly important to check your rotors before you fit new pads. It's possible that the last person to do pads didn't check them and you could already be below minimum spec. Last, if you are able to reuse your rotors, do be sure to prep them properly since you are changing pad compounds.

Take care and enjoy the ride,
Greg
 
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