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Hello, I'm a complete newbie so I apologize if this has been covered before.

I have a 2010 ML350 Bluetec with over 170k miles. I've never replaced the timing chain or any related components. However, I'm aware that this engine is prone to timing chain and tensioner issues when over 100k/150k miles. So I'm worried about mine and would like to catch it before anything crazy happens.

I've attached a pic of the tensioner through the oil fill hole. Couldn't quite get the best look, but it's visible. Does it look over-extended? Is it bad? Should I replace? I haven't heard the 2-second rattle on cold start, so I'm a bit indecisive. However, the car has had some jerky acceleration issues and very fast deceleration when rolling to a stop lately, so I'm wondering if timing might be a good place to start.

All ideas and help are welcome. Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Is the Check Eng. Light on?

Do you own your own SCANNER, not a code reader?
Thanks a lot for the reply. I had around 5 codes initially, which have cleared after working in a turbo leak and changing fuel injectors. However, there's 1 stubborn code remaining, P0088 - FUEL RAIL/SYSTEM PRESSURE TOO HIGH. The car is still a bit sluggish on acceleration and can't seem to get over 45/50mph.

Any ideas?
 

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P codes do not exist in CDI or Blue. Buy a scanner.

 

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P codes do not exist in CDI or Blue. Buy a scanner.

Really... so the codes the reader has been showing are inaccurate?? I already have a scanner.. that's how I got the code
 

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Yes on the really. You have a code reader and not a scanner.
Thanks for the heads up. Guess I'll have to cough up some money to get one. But before that, can you give any suggestions based on what the code reader says? Or is a scanner the only way to have any idea of what's going on
 

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CURRENT: 2011 SL550 FORMER: C300, ML350, CLK550 Cabriolet, C240, ML320, 300TD
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Using a generic OBDII code reader, you will only get generic "P" codes from the ECU. OBDII is a "one size fits all" diagnostic system required on every car sold in the USA beginning in 1996. Manufacturers must conform to it, but they are free to also add in their own specialized diagnostics. For example, your W164 has over 20 electronic devices that can all be communicated with through the OBIDD port using the proper tools. The ECU on your car has it's own set of DTCs (diagnostic test codes) that MBZ has created. Some of those will be "mapped" to generic OBDII codes as required by government regulations. When you read codes with a generic OBDII tool, you get those mapped P codes which may or may not help a technician diagnose the problems. With the native MBZ-specific DTCs, you may get more information.

The best tool for reading codes and performing other diagnostic work on MBZ vehicles is SDS (Star Diagnosis, a.k.a. Xentry). It is the tool dealers and a few high-end shops use. You can obtain a "Chinese clone" system for yourself from $250-$700 depending on how much work you want to do to put it together. Another option is to buy a 3rd party handheld tool that can read MBZ-specific codes. Some examples include the iCarsoft MBII, Fozwelln510, Autel DIagLink. There are others, but these are ones I know of that can pretty much read natives DTCs form all of your car's systems, and just the ECU, but the transmission, airbags, radio, door controllers, SAMS, etc.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Using a generic OBDII code reader, you will only get generic "P" codes from the ECU. OBDII is a "one size fits all" diagnostic system required on every car sold in the USA beginning in 1996. Manufacturers must conform to it, but they are free to also add in their own specialized diagnostics. For example, your W164 has over 20 electronic devices that can all be communicated with through the OBIDD port using the proper tools. The ECU on your car has it's own set of DTCs (diagnostic test codes) that MBZ has created. Some of those will be "mapped" to generic OBDII codes as required by government regulations. When you read codes with a generic OBDII tool, you get those mapped P codes which may or may not help a technician diagnose the problems. With the native MBZ-specific DTCs, you may get more information.

The best tool for reading codes and performing other diagnostic work on MBZ vehicles is SDS (Star Diagnosis, a.k.a. Xentry). It is the tool dealers and a few high-end shops use. You can obtain a "Chinese clone" system for yourself from $250-$700 depending on how much work you want to do to put it together. Another option is to buy a 3rd party handheld tool that can read MBZ-specific codes. Some examples include the iCarsoft MBII, Fozwelln510, Autel DIagLink. There are others, but these are ones I know of that can pretty much read natives DTCs form all of your car's systems, and just the ECU, but the transmission, airbags, radio, door controllers, SAMS, etc.
Thanks a lot. Very helpful. I've heard about the iCarsoft and was actually planting on getting my hands on one. In the meantime, I'll see if I can find a shop with SDS for a quick scan. Thanks.
 

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Using a generic OBDII code reader, you will only get generic "P" codes from the ECU. OBDII is a "one size fits all" diagnostic system required on every car sold in the USA beginning in 1996. Manufacturers must conform to it, but they are free to also add in their own specialized diagnostics. For example, your W164 has over 20 electronic devices that can all be communicated with through the OBIDD port using the proper tools. The ECU on your car has it's own set of DTCs (diagnostic test codes) that MBZ has created. Some of those will be "mapped" to generic OBDII codes as required by government regulations. When you read codes with a generic OBDII tool, you get those mapped P codes which may or may not help a technician diagnose the problems. With the native MBZ-specific DTCs, you may get more information.

The best tool for reading codes and performing other diagnostic work on MBZ vehicles is SDS (Star Diagnosis, a.k.a. Xentry). It is the tool dealers and a few high-end shops use. You can obtain a "Chinese clone" system for yourself from $250-$700 depending on how much work you want to do to put it together. Another option is to buy a 3rd party handheld tool that can read MBZ-specific codes. Some examples include the iCarsoft MBII, Fozwelln510, Autel DIagLink. There are others, but these are ones I know of that can pretty much read natives DTCs form all of your car's systems, and just the ECU, but the transmission, airbags, radio, door controllers, SAMS, etc.
Hi again.

So I was able to find a shop with an Autel scanner and got the following 2 diesel codes:

11BF00 - The control deviation during the rail pressure regulation via the pressure regulator valve (in closed status) is too high. (Stored)

13AF00 - The soot content of the Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF) is too high. (Stored & Current)

Any ideas?
 
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