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1985 500 SEC EURO AMG/LORINSER; 1988 560SEL, 1995 S500 Sonderschutz
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3,679 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I am going insane trying to get this damn T30 bolt out of my SRS control unit. The dash is so "elegantly" constructed that it prohibits any sort of tool from getting a good grip on this thing. THE BOLT IS RIGHT THERE WHY CAN'T I TURN IT!???

I have bloody and bruised knuckles and I'm very low on patience. I'm ready to tear the whole damn center console out, tear the control unit out, and then set the car on fire.

I've bought torx sockets, 3/8" drive socket wrench, all sizes of extensions, a Torx "universal" tool, a Torx screwdriver and nothing can touch this TORX BOLT FROM HELL.

I have to replace this thing to pass inspection. I have probably $50 of credit left to my name, getting laid off for 6 weeks, trying to go to baltimore to see my best friend leave for Hawaii, and get gas money to go around in between then. I think I need a break from this damn 126.

Help me.
 

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1985 500 SEC EURO AMG/LORINSER; 1988 560SEL, 1995 S500 Sonderschutz
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3,679 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
Okay, I'm calm. I'll try hunting the hardware stores for something right angled, in T30 sizes. I'll make it fun! yeah that's it...
 

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1985 500 SEC EURO AMG/LORINSER; 1988 560SEL, 1995 S500 Sonderschutz
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3,679 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Craftsman easy-out? (bolt extractor)
The real problem is that there is no room to fit anything under the dash and lots of plastic barriers are in the way. The bolt is in easy reach, just not for anything strong enough to turn it. If only I had super human hands... VICE GRIPS!
 

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Premium Member
2012 CL550 4MATIC Coupe
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9,985 Posts
Firewater - Stay Calm... Been there and Done that.... One thing you can do is goto Sears and get their Torx set, the screwdrivers for $19.95 and then take the T-30 out and then measure the shaft and get a socket that will JUST fit that shaft. Use a cut off wheel and cut the handle off (Only you will know how short to make it) then Weld the tip into the socket making it a socket driven tool and then use a 90 deg tool or just use a really long handle extension to increase the fulcrum force. Try that and DON'T have an aneurysm, I've had one and they are not fun!. U need help call or PM me.

Also, you may need to remove you center console. Look at My VLOG and you will see what the access is like when the center console is removed. I do not say this lightly, and I know the implications of this. I can walk you through that and it's only a full day's job. But atleast it will not be in vain as you know that this will fix your problem.
 

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Registered
1985 500 SEC EURO AMG/LORINSER; 1988 560SEL, 1995 S500 Sonderschutz
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3,679 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
I like your VLOG. I also like my job. So maybe I'll lay off the forums till after work... Thanks for helping me keep my sanity.
 

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Premium Member
2012 CL550 4MATIC Coupe
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9,985 Posts
You sill have my number? Call me and I will walk you through it, OK? BACK TO WORK!
 

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Registered
1985 500 SEC EURO AMG/LORINSER; 1988 560SEL, 1995 S500 Sonderschutz
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3,679 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
I just need an L shaped T30. Unfortunately they are all special order items from hardware stores. I'm a "get it done now" kind of guy.
 

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Premium Member
2012 CL550 4MATIC Coupe
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9,985 Posts
Go buy that set and then put it in a vise and bend it.
 

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1987 420SEL
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1,133 Posts
If it's hardened and you go to bend it without heat, you're going to kill yourself and everyone else in a small radius...:D

Use a propane torch and heat the bend zone a dull red prior to putting force on it; it'll be like butter.
 

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1985 500 SEC EURO AMG/LORINSER; 1988 560SEL, 1995 S500 Sonderschutz
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3,679 Posts
Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
I don't even own a vice.

I need one of these. I hate waiting.

 

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1987 420SEL
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1,133 Posts
I HAVE a set of those!

This struck me right after I finished that other post. They're basically an off-set screw driver, only with Torx ends.

If you're super-impatient, go at it with a cape-chisel and hammer on the circumference of the screw head, just off-set from the centre line in the direction to unscrew it. A few light raps and it should loosen enough for some needle-nose pliers to take over.
 

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Premium Member
2012 CL550 4MATIC Coupe
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9,985 Posts
I HAVE a set of those!

This struck me right after I finished that other post. They're basically an off-set screw driver, only with Torx ends.

If you're super-impatient, go at it with a cape-chisel and hammer on the circumference of the screw head, just off-set from the centre line in the direction to unscrew it. A few light raps and it should loosen enough for some needle-nose pliers to take over.
Yeah, make sure the power is OFF because you are Rapping on the G-Force Module that deploys the airbags. I am sure if you buy the tool from Sears, they will bend it for you out in the Auto shop. ANY metal shop can bend it...

Improvise Marine...
 

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Premium Member
2012 CL550 4MATIC Coupe
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9,985 Posts
If it's hardened and you go to bend it without heat, you're going to kill yourself and everyone else in a small radius...:D

Use a propane torch and heat the bend zone a dull red prior to putting force on it; it'll be like butter.
Okay, If you heat it and do not quench it cool, you will brittle the metal with the heat. You will need to anneal the metal by quenching it. That's why they do that. The heat makes the metal brittle and the cold water re-aligns the molecules of steel.

At least that's what I understand of Metallurgy.

I can guarantee that you cold bend a Sears Craftsman Torx Screwdriver without it "Snapping Wild" and killing all involved.
 

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1987 420SEL
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Okay, If you heat it and do not quench it cool, you will brittle the metal with the heat. You will need to anneal the metal by quenching it. That's why they do that. The heat makes the metal brittle and the cold water re-aligns the molecules of steel.

At least that's what I understand of Metallurgy.

I can guarantee that you cold bend a Sears Craftsman Torx Screwdriver without it "Snapping Wild" and killing all involved.
I understand entirely; it was an exageration more than anything.:thumbsup:

I was thinking more of just bending the tip of the tool, which is what would be heat-treated, if anything was, and would probably just snap off if bent cold. As an alternative, you can use two pairs of vise-grips to bend the tool; the vise-grips have soft-jaws, so you won't hurt anything getting them hot.

Okay, If you heat it and do not quench it cool, you will brittle the metal with the heat. You will need to anneal the metal by quenching it. That's why they do that. The heat makes the metal brittle and the cold water re-aligns the molecules of steel.
^Quite the opposite; (I've been waiting to offer such information!)

Steel and the vast majority of its alloys are not heat-treated in this fashion. The only metal that I can think of off hand that gets hardened by heat alone is copper. The annealing process is also reversed.

If you heat a steel part that has been previously hardened, depending on your skill with a torch, you will most likely take the temper out of the metal and enable it to be manipulated more easily. The downside is that you would have to re-heat it to get the initial hardness back.

Quenching the metal cool whether it be in water or oil does not make it any less brittle. Quenching a part in even air will make it extremely brittle.

What takes the brittle nature out of the steel part would be to temper it; tempering allows the steel to retain its 'hardness' but also allows some give to aid in durability and toughness. To temper a steel part, you would typically heat it to a predetermined temperature in an oven for a specified time and then turn the heat off and allow the oven and the contained part to cool naturally for an extended period.

Quenching a freshly heated steel part in water just solidifies the molecules in the utterly f*cked up matrix they manifested themselves into during the heating. To relax the molecules on a critical part, it's generally stress-relieved.

You can try to temper something with a torch, but you really have to be experienced in terms of torch control and the colours steel will turn at differing temperatures. For small parts, interestingly enough, you can sit them on a bed of brass filings to aid in a more unified heat absorption and transmission.

Annealing is an entirely different animal, and is typically done to remove and relax the molecular bond of the material to aid in machining or forming. When some materials are worked (such as when a panel or plate is extruded) they can work-harden and become inconveniently resiliant. I've made curved aluminum panels on an english wheel and before working with them, I used an annealing technique that required a pure acetylene flame on an oxy-acetylene torch (very sooty) to coat the material, and then a low carburizing flame (high fuel: oxidizer ratio) fanned just quickly enough to vapourize the soot left on the plate. Works fantastic; it's an old trade trick.

There's literally hundreds of textbooks on just the subject of heat treating different alloys of steel. We could go on for hours about depth of hardness and specific draw times of random steels, but this is BenzWorld.

My whole point being that if you're going to bend anything with heat, don't heat the portion of it that has obviously already been tempered from the manufacturer.
 

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2012 CL550 4MATIC Coupe
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9,985 Posts
Well I meant for him to bend the shaft, say 2 inches up. I think he's safe. He will need a vise to do it.
 

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1985 500 SEC EURO AMG/LORINSER; 1988 560SEL, 1995 S500 Sonderschutz
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Discussion Starter #17
hahahaha. I love you guys.
 
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