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99 SLK230 SPORT
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Discussion Starter #1
as topic states...

LSD is "Limited Slip Differential"

which means both the wheels will spin to gain traction. I have heard that the SLKs came standard with the LSD but I am not sure...can someone tell me?!

thanks
 

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Discussion Starter #3
wow...worthless

my brothers Z4 doesn't have one either

WHATTA KRAP
 

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2002 SLK 32 AMG, bone stock. 1987 190E 2.3-16 valve (destroyed). 2005 E320 new toy.
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Maybe yes, maybe no.......

It depends on your defineition. There is no limited slip differential as typically defined, that is with clutches in the rear end pumpkin, however, the traction control applies brakes to the spinning wheel in order to get it under control. There are at least three benefits:
(1) It's lighter in weight.
(2) There are no clutches to wear out and replace.
(3) It's cheaper to produce.
Is that better? Can't answer that, but most people don't firewall the throttle at every traffic light, instead they run faster then they should around turns. The weight savings there would be more important... [;)]
 

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06 corvette coupe
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RE: Maybe yes, maybe no.......

Bruce R. - 5/16/2005 6:58 AM

It depends on your defineition. There is no limited slip differential as typically defined, that is with clutches in the rear end pumpkin, however, the traction control applies brakes to the spinning wheel in order to get it under control. There are at least three benefits:
(1) It's lighter in weight.
(2) There are no clutches to wear out and replace.
(3) It's cheaper to produce.
Is that better? Can't answer that, but most people don't firewall the throttle at every traffic light, instead they run faster then they should around turns. The weight savings there would be more important... [;)]
that's a good point. But if you do hit the 1/4 mile track, having one tire fire is horrible. the posi on my mustang went out at the track one night, and we couldn't get it to hook for anything. 60 foot times were in the minutes.[:D]
 

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SLK32, ML430
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RE: Maybe yes, maybe no.......

Bruce R. - 5/16/2005 6:58 AM

It depends on your defineition. There is no limited slip differential as typically defined, that is with clutches in the rear end pumpkin, however, the traction control applies brakes to the spinning wheel in order to get it under control. There are at least three benefits:
(1) It's lighter in weight.
(2) There are no clutches to wear out and replace.
(3) It's cheaper to produce.
Is that better? Can't answer that, but most people don't firewall the throttle at every traffic light, instead they run faster then they should around turns. The weight savings there would be more important... [;)]
Of course if you have a gear based LSD (Quafie) you get the traction benefits withough worrying about clutches wearing out.
 

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2002 SLK 32 AMG, bone stock. 1987 190E 2.3-16 valve (destroyed). 2005 E320 new toy.
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That's not entirely accurate ...................

Positive traction will alway get you out of corner faster.
That is not entirely true. Once the car reaches about 30 mph the traction control whether ESP or ASR partially shuts down. When coming out of a turn the free running diff that is standard on the SLK will have less drag then the always engaged limited slip diff. Less drag equates to more power to the track, and therefore quicker reaction. At speeds lower then ~ 30 mph I can agree with you.
The fact is unless you are a rank beginner on the track, the ASR/ESP is turned off on the starting grid.
 

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RE: That's not entirely accurate ...................

Bruce R. - 5/17/2005 3:57 PM

Positive traction will alway get you out of corner faster.
That is not entirely true. Once the car reaches about 30 mph the traction control whether ESP or ASR partially shuts down. When coming out of a turn the free running diff that is standard on the SLK will have less drag then the always engaged limited slip diff. Less drag equates to more power to the track, and therefore quicker reaction. At speeds lower then ~ 30 mph I can agree with you.
The fact is unless you are a rank beginner on the track, the ASR/ESP is turned off on the starting grid.
Even a rank ameture should have ESP off on the starting grid. It will shut the power down and you will lose a lot of time.
 

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'01 SLK320 Sport, '02 G500
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I talked to a guy at an auto-x in Texas who was running a SLK230. He said if you pull the e-brake one click it turns the ABS and ESP off. I have not tried it as our SLK320 has been in the shop for a month. I am also not sure how enthused I am about running around with the e-brake engaged, even only a little.

On a related note, I posted a while back that Road & Track had procedures to disable ABS, ESP, and traction control. But those were apparently only for the SLK350. If someone had the repair manuals, they could probably figure it out.
 

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2002 SLK 32 AMG, bone stock. 1987 190E 2.3-16 valve (destroyed). 2005 E320 new toy.
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RE: That's not entirely accurate ...................

Even a rank ameture should have ESP off on the starting grid. It will shut the power down and you will lose a lot of time.
I agree with you, but there is a big difference between a beginner and an amateur. Take an older driver with an SL 55, E55, or something equal, and it's his/her first time on the track for a "Driver's Education Course" or at an autocross. In most cases it's easier just to leave the ESP on until they get over their "point and shoot" mentality. After a few laps or runs they may get the idea that all that power can't be used all the time, the ESP tends to keep them from embarrassing themselves.
 

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RE: That's not entirely accurate ...................

Bruce R. - 5/18/2005 7:31 AM

Even a rank ameture should have ESP off on the starting grid. It will shut the power down and you will lose a lot of time.
I agree with you, but there is a big difference between a beginner and an amateur. Take an older driver with an SL 55, E55, or something equal, and it's his/her first time on the track for a "Driver's Education Course" or at an autocross. In most cases it's easier just to leave the ESP on until they get over their "point and shoot" mentality. After a few laps or runs they may get the idea that all that power can't be used all the time, the ESP tends to keep them from embarrassing themselves.
Yes, but now you are changing the equation. We were discussing SLK's not SL55's or E55's. As an old law professor used to tell me "Change the facts and you change the law".

True you can't completly shut off ESP in the SLK's (unless the handbrake trick works. I know it works on some cars but have never tried it in an MB) but it is better than nothing. One of the first things I do every time I get in the car is to turn off ESP. Damn thing has almost killed me too many times but shutting down the power when it is needed.
 

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RE: That's not entirely accurate ...................

Yes, but now you are changing the equation. We were discussing SLK's not SL55's or E55's. As an old law professor used to tell me "Change the facts and you change the law".
OK, not a problem. In that case the SLK 32 is the only SLK that I would treat that way, because once the 230's and 320's are moving above say 15 or 20 mph there isn't enough power to break loose the rear wheels unless the surface is slick. On a wet track the ASR/ESP is helpful for beginners regardless of which car they drive, it helps keep the car under control in the tighter turns. Once a half dozen or so laps are under the drivers belt the ASR/ESP can come off, and the fun begins...
One of the first things I do every time I get in the car is to turn off ESP. Damn thing has almost killed me too many times but shutting down the power when it is needed.
I generally leave mine on, until I feel the need to turn it off. It's all in how you want to drive. To each his/her own ... [:D]
 

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I agree with 430. We have a 6-speed manual, and I find the ESP interferes with basic driving in a manual transmission. I turn it off every time I turn on the car, track or street. Of course, then I am blinded by the huge yellow light in the middle of my gauges.
 
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