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1985 380SE
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1,939 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Whenever I'm near a running 300D (or an 5 cylinder W123) at an intersection let's say, and then compare it to a 240D, it always seems to me the 240 has more diesel exhaust stink to it. Diesel exhaust doesn't bother me at all, whereas my dad gets nauseated. :rolleyes:

Anyone have any thoughts or similar experiences?
 

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1984 €uro 300D NA
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758 Posts
The W123 diesels are primitive in their exhaust systems. My 300D is no cleaner than your 240D. There are three things one can do to lessen the acrid exhaust. 1) replace worn injector nozzles 2) run biodiesel whether B20 or B99 3) rebuild an engine that burns an excessive amount of oil

Even you will get nauseous if you tailgate my pickup truck running on pure #2 but if I'm running on B99 you'll get hungry. :D
 

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money pits of various forms
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5,885 Posts
Uh there are a few other things you missed, regular maintenance items often overlooked. Injector pop testing (no need to replace nozzles that work properly), injection timing, cam timing, ip bench testing.
 

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1983 300D Turbo Diesel
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1,799 Posts
I work in the bus industry so they actually run clean as far as I'm concerned.
 

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1985 380SE
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1,939 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
The W123 diesels are primitive in their exhaust systems. My 300D is no cleaner than your 240D. There are three things one can do to lessen the acrid exhaust. 1) replace worn injector nozzles 2) run biodiesel whether B20 or B99 3) rebuild an engine that burns an excessive amount of oil

Even you will get nauseous if you tailgate my pickup truck running on pure #2 but if I'm running on B99 you'll get hungry. :D
1) The car has 97k on it and the injectors seem to be fine.
2) I don't drive it enough to warrant the use of BD.
3) The oil burn thus far is very minimal.
 

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'77 6.9, 74 240D, 96 Ram 5.9L Cummins
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2,654 Posts
2) I don't drive it enough to warrant the use of BD.

Well why not? It transforms the smell of the car entirely. It's quieter and cleaner. They have B99 too.

LC Biofuels, LLC
14 Greenfield Ave
San Anselmo, CA 94960
Phone: 510-232-0416

Try it and your dad will not be so nauseated.
 

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1985 380SE
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Discussion Starter #7
Don't the fuel hoses have to be changed so they don't dissolve?
 

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'77 6.9, 74 240D, 96 Ram 5.9L Cummins
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Don't the fuel hoses have to be changed so they don't dissolve?
No they don't unless the hoses are bad or worn to begin with. They only dissolve when there's too much methanol when you make DIY biodiesel. It's pump grade so it should be fine.

You'll also find out how clean your fuel system is too. You may need some extra fuel filters since a lot of crud dissolves and is flushed forward.
 

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1982 Mercedes 300D Turbo Diesel
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141 Posts
Wish I could get B99 here. I can get B20 but it's not quite the same. Will keep hoping that one day the B99 fairy visits.
 

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'77 6.9, 74 240D, 96 Ram 5.9L Cummins
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I can get only B11 here. WHAAA?? I also have to drive to Illinois to get it too at a truckstop. Doesn't make sense since so many people drive TDI's around here. The only other WI locations are 50+ miles from Milwaukee.

My cummins is pretty stinky on dino diesel.....
 

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1983 300D Turbo Diesel
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wow, theres a biodiesel station 5 miles north of me! i didnt know that.
 

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'73 450SL, '83 300CD, '01 E320 4matic
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I work in the bus industry so they actually run clean as far as I'm concerned.
Haha, I work in the bus industry too. Old busses stink... but they're reliable. the new ones don't really stink at all... and those ones keep me employed.
 

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'73 450SL, '83 300CD, '01 E320 4matic
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It's true. I'm interested to see how the newer diesel engines in passenger cars compare with the commercial stuff.

The DPF systems and various other emissions control devices on the newer commercial diesel engines seem to be fairly reliable in an over-the-road application such as a tractor trailer. In other words, something that routinely travels at higher speeds for prolonged periods of time. Under those conditions the DPF can go through it's cleaning cycles (regenerations) undetected by the operator. It is against DOT regs for the regen to occur at speeds less than around 30 MPH, because exhaust temperatures are increased to dangerous levels that could injure someone who might walk by the tailpipe.

In the case of a bus, which is designed for stop and go, they tend to require manual regens. That means a trip to (us) the dealer, because inevitably the operator of the vehicle will let it go too long, and a computer will be required to manually do the regen.

So basically, the passenger cars with diesel engines are required to meet similar emissions standards. City drivers might be in for a real treat...

*sorry to hijack the thread*
 
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