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U.S deadly attacks

To protect civilians," President Obama poured unknown quantities of the deadly Depleted Uranium “in densely populated areas of Libya, according to the news story No. 25, the more hidden by the U.S. media, according to annual Project Censored report 2012.

The undeclared Obama´s war, and unauthorized by the Congress, could set the crime to spill the toxic and rusty dust on the Libyan people, detached by the coverings depleted uranium of heavy artillery.

This concern was expressed by groups such as the International Coalition to Ban Uranium Weapons, which monitors military use as antitank ammunition shells and anti-tank missiles, capable of penetrating underground thick walls.

The U.S did not place the aircrafts A-10 Thunderbolts in Libya up to March 2010, probably because these straight wing and heavily armored subsonic devices are vulnerable to the antiaircraft missiles shot by the Libyan forces.

However, once the systematic bombing improved the NATO air control, it is likely that these specialized ground attack aircrafts have been added to the attacking forces.

The A-10 has a particularly large automatic cannon that shoots a caliber also unusually large, 30 mm. These missiles often carry solid uranium.

The A - 10 were widely used in the Balkan conflict, but the new authorities in Kosovo were dismayed when they realized that in his territory 11 tons of depleted uranium were scattered and left a trail of dangerous radioactive dust.

The British Harrier jets, used by British naval forces and air-pilots and also by the U.S. Navy, are often equipped with cannon shells designed for 20 mm in depleted uranium.

The U.S. military are very attached to the missiles made of the remains of uranium already has been stripped of fissionable U-235, because this "depleted uranium" is an extremely hard material that alloyed with other materials, is also extremely hard. Due to the atomic weight of its mass, "depleted uranium" missiles can penetrate even the hardest and heaviest harmors.

The high temperature caused by the collision of the projectile explodes the uranium into flames, in a highly toxic and explosive generating extreme heat, causing an inferno inside the tank or vehicle-white, being the crew incinerated.

The problem is that the uranium oxide resulting from such explosions, besides being highly toxic, is also a microscopic alpha emitter, and if it is inhaled or ingested by humans is extremely carcinogenic and mutagenic.

Traces of uranium dust may also have affected the "rebels" supported by NATO. Images taken in the early hours of the assault led by the U.S against the forces of Colonel Muammar Gaddafy, showed triumphant Libyan civilians and rebels celebrating around burning and smoldering hulks that were once tanks and armored personnel carriers of the Libyan army destroyed by the U.S. and Franco British air artillery.

These people, who appear in bright images at the outcome of the Franco-British bombing Americans, might have inhaled the deadly unknown quantities of uranium dust from the favorite weapons of the Western military forces for antitank war.

It would be a tragic irony for the rebels in Libya, if the military aid requested to the U.S. and other NATO countries, ended up contaminating the same depleted uranium dust that changed the destiny to many people from the suffering people of Kuwait, Iraq ,Afghanistan and Kosovo.

There were cities in Iraq where Depleted Uranium weapons were widely used such as Basra, Samara, Baghdad, Mosul, and especially Fallujah, which was virtually destroyed in an assault by the Navy in November 2004 and are currently showing many cases of defects and deformities of birth, and unusually high rates of leukemia, identified by medical experts as emblematic of the effects of fetal radiation caused by depleted uranium.

A study supervised by the University of Michigan, published in December 2010 showed that out of 547 births in the Fallujah General Hospital, the 15% of babies had birth defects-a rate more than five times higher than the global average of 2 to 3%. The study was done in May 2010, six years after the U.S. assault on that front city of 300,000 inhabitants in which the Depleted Uranium weapons were used, as reported.
 

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Who writes this shit? :confused:

Usually, depleted uranium is only deadly when a 1/2 Kg piece of it hits you in the chest at 1,000 ft/sec.
Depleted uranium (DU; also referred to in the past as Q-metal, depletalloy, or D-38) is uranium with a lower content of the fissile isotope U-235 than natural uranium (natural uranium is about 99.27% uranium-238 (U-238), 0.72% U-235, and 0.0055% U-234). Uses of DU take advantage of its very high density of 19.1 g/cm3 (68.4% denser than lead). Civilian uses include counterweights in aircraft, radiation shielding in medical radiation therapy and industrial radiography equipment, and containers used to transport radioactive materials. Military uses include defensive armor plating and armor-piercing projectiles.

Most depleted uranium arises as a byproduct of the production of enriched uranium for use in nuclear reactors and in the manufacture of nuclear weapons. Enrichment processes generate from the uranium feed a small fraction of uranium with a higher-than-natural concentration of lower-mass uranium isotopes (in particular U-235, which is the uranium isotope supporting the fission chain reaction) with the bulk of the feed ending up as depleted uranium, in some cases with mass fractions of U-235 and U-234 less than a third of those in natural uranium. U-238 has a much longer halflife than the lighter isotopes, and DU therefore emits less alpha radiation than the same mass of natural uranium: the US Defense Department states DU used in US munitions has 60% the radioactivity of natural uranium.

Since the U-235 content of nuclear reactor fuel is reduced by fission, uranium recovered by nuclear reprocessing from spent nuclear reactor fuel made from natural uranium will have a lower-than-natural U-235 concentration. Such ‘reactor-depleted’ material will have different isotopics from enrichment byproduct DU, and can be distinguished from it by the presence of U-236. Trace transuranics (another indicator of the use of reprocessed material) have been reported to be present in some US tank armour.

The use of DU in munitions is controversial because of questions about potential long-term health effects. Normal functioning of the kidney, brain, liver, heart, and numerous other systems can be affected by uranium exposure, because uranium is a toxic metal. It is weakly radioactive and remains so because of its long physical half-life (4.468 billion years for uranium-238, 700 million years for uranium-235). The biological half-life (the average time it takes for the human body to eliminate half the amount in the body) for uranium is about 15 days. The aerosol or spallation frangible powder produced during impact and combustion of depleted uranium munitions can potentially contaminate wide areas around the impact sites leading to possible inhalation by human beings.

The actual acute and chronic toxicity of DU is also a point of medical controversy. Multiple studies using cultured cells and laboratory rodents suggest the possibility of leukemogenic, genetic, reproductive, and neurological effects from chronic exposure. A 2005 epidemiology review concluded: "In aggregate the human epidemiological evidence is consistent with increased risk of birth defects in offspring of persons exposed to DU." The World Health Organization, the directing and coordinating authority for health within the United Nations which is responsible for setting health research norms and standards, providing technical support to countries and monitoring and assessing health trends, states that no risk of reproductive, developmental, or carcinogenic effects have been reported in humans due to DU exposure. This report has been criticized by Dr. Keith Baverstock for not including possible long term effects of DU on the human body.

Since 2001, medical personnel at the Basra hospital in southern Iraq have reported a sharp increase in the incidence of child leukemia and genetic malformation among babies born in the decade following the Gulf War. Iraqi doctors attributed these malformations to possible long-term effects of DU, an opinion which was echoed by several newspapers.[78][107][108][109] In 2004, Iraq had the highest mortality rate due to leukemia of any country.[110] The International Coalition to Ban Uranium Weapons (ICBUW) has made a call to support an epidemiological study in the Basra region, as asked for by Iraqi doctors,[111] but no peer-reviewed study has yet been undertaken in Basra.

A medical survey, "Cancer, Infant Mortality and Birth Sex Ratio in Fallujah, Iraq 2005–2009" published in July 2010, states that the “Increase in cancer and birth defects…are alarmingly high” and that infant mortality 2009/2010 has reached 13.6%. The group compares the dramatic increase, five years after the actual war 2004, or exposure, with the lymphoma Italian peacekeepers developed after the Balkan wars, and the increased cancer risk in certain parts of Sweden due to the Chernobyl fallout. The origin and time of introduction of the carcinogenic agent causing the genetic stress, the group will address in a separate report.
 

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