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1991 Mercedes-Benz 300SE W140 (3.2L M104.992)
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233 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello!

So after having some weird sounds with my CV axle, I replaced it with another (used) one. Sounds are gone.

Having my old CV axle out, I wanted to disassemble it and take a look at it, what's inside.

This is not a tutorial. I will explain the way I removed CV axle from car and how I disassembled It

So, to remove the axle:
  1. I removed the wheel center cap
  2. "Unbended" the axle nut "security tab"
  3. Using 32 millimeter head and a lot of force I broke loose the axle securing nut
  4. Jacked up the car, put it on bricks (my version of jackstand :D), removed the wheel
  5. Using 12 star head (10mm) removed the 6 bolts, holding the CV axle to the differential (before doing this, cleaned the bolt heads so that nothing strips)
  6. Removed the exaust (final muffler) from it's end rubbers; let it hang
  7. Removed the sway bar link carefully, taking the load off the sway bar
  8. Removed the plastic cover from lower control arm
  9. Removed the large bolt, that holds together knuckle with lower control arm (In my case it was 21mm nut and bolt head was 22mm)
  10. With 60 hits using large hammer and a lot of WD-40 smashed out the CV axle from hub splines (have heard that this can ruin your bearing; mine is still fine...)
  11. With some thinking and maneuvering removed the CV axle completely.
With it completely removed, I installed the "new one" in pretty much reverse order.

I could not find the procedure of CV axle disassembly anywhere so I thinked through It and I did it!

Wood Metal Fashion accessory Circle Font


So, to dissasemble this massive structure, I:
  1. Using a flat blade screwdriver and hammer (hitthing the lip of cover) removed the cover
  2. Removed the snap ring which allowed the balls and its ring to slide off
  3. Removed the "casing" where balls ride
  4. Removed the other cover, using the same technique as in 1st step
  5. Removed the casing from the balls
  6. Removed the balls with cage and now I had bare shaft.
In the next images you will se the state of internals. I must say, that the grease was very stinky and burnt smelling. In some areas it is rock hard and burned to the surface.

Light Material property Auto part Gas Composite material

Automotive lighting Audio equipment Rim Automotive tire Auto part

The balls and cage on the whell bearing side

Wood Composite material Auto part Metal Audio equipment

Head Jaw Audio equipment Personal protective equipment Helmet

The differential side

After seeing these images, how do you think - are these components reusable? Like there is no major wear. The shiny parts on components are made from balls riding on them. there are smooth and no metal is missing. I think a lot and good quality new grease will get these ones running for many more years... or am I wrong?
 

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1984 300D
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5,522 Posts
Personally if the balls are still good I would reuse it. If it was were I used to work I would be told to get some 500 grit wet and dry paper and polish up the wear areas and if I wanted to go down to say 1200 grit.
When it was taken apart did it have grease in it or Oil? On my 84 300D the original came with oil similar to differential oil. When I re-booted my old axles I used CV Joint Grease.

Personally I think the Grease is better because of something comes up from the road and puts hole in the boot large enough to let the oil out there is a good chance of losing all of the oil. With grease it is not going to come out as easy and some is still going to stay in the actual joint.
 

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1991 Mercedes-Benz 300SE W140 (3.2L M104.992)
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233 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Personally if the balls are still good I would reuse it. If it was were I used to work I would be told to get some 500 grit wet and dry paper and polish up the wear areas and if I wanted to go down to say 1200 grit.
When it was taken apart did it have grease in it or Oil? On my 84 300D the original came with oil similar to differential oil. When I re-booted my old axles I used CV Joint Grease.

Personally I think the Grease is better because of something comes up from the road and puts hole in the boot large enough to let the oil out there is a good chance of losing all of the oil. With grease it is not going to come out as easy and some is still going to stay in the actual joint.
it came with grease. i will use grease too
 

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1999 E430; 2005 ML500
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2,335 Posts
If there is no grooving or pitting, they can be re-used. However, I would only do it if you can get good quality boots on with perfect clamping. Nothing generates a higher level of DIY-disappointment than looking under your car a year later to find a torn or leaking boot on your lovingly restored half-axle.
 

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W140 Mercedes 500 SE, 1992, European, 440.000 km
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4,016 Posts
here in this part of the world axles can be overhauled by an expert for a low cost. Adding of material on worn places is needed and then fine machining follows. I am sure you can find an expert there who will repair your both axles for 200 eur. they will make another 100,000 km then. new axles are ca 2000 eur. used on ebay are 400 eur but you must trust the seller they have no significant wear.
 
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