Mercedes-Benz Forum banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
181 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hey,
I just got a sub installed in my W124...
With a MB Quart 350w 2ch amp..

Anyway, I would like to cut a hole on the parcel shelf where the first aid kit is... and use the original first aid kit cover to cover it up... and put the first aid kit somewhere else...

Would this help in getting more bass into the cabin? What tools do I need to cut that hole? I do not really fancy the idea of taking the parcel shelf out really...

Any input is appreciated,
Thanks,
Jeff
 

·
Registered
W203 modified
Joined
·
2,032 Posts
jeffreyli86 - 3/6/2005 10:56 PM

Hey,
I just got a sub installed in my W124...
With a MB Quart 350w 2ch amp..

Anyway, I would like to cut a hole on the parcel shelf where the first aid kit is... and use the original first aid kit cover to cover it up... and put the first aid kit somewhere else...

Would this help in getting more bass into the cabin? What tools do I need to cut that hole? I do not really fancy the idea of taking the parcel shelf out really...

Any input is appreciated,
Thanks,
Jeff
When you say MORE BASS dont you think that the same phase sound coming out of two similar locations will do nothing more than create a radial pattern of sweet spots with dead zones. You will need to trim the wave phase if you want to have even the slightest hope of making the sound even with consistent coverage.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
181 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the input mate.
However, I have a feeling that the bass is all trapped in the boot (I drive a W124) since the tank is behind the rear seats...

I was just wondering if cutting a hole on the rear parcel shelf would let the bass kind of "flow in"

Thanks,
Jeff
 

·
Registered
W203 modified
Joined
·
2,032 Posts
jeffreyli86 - 3/7/2005 5:45 AM

Thanks for the input mate.
However, I have a feeling that the bass is all trapped in the boot (I drive a W124) since the tank is behind the rear seats...

I was just wondering if cutting a hole on the rear parcel shelf would let the bass kind of "flow in"

Thanks,
Jeff
Following the laws of musical instrument construction I would venture to say that it would become a harmonic value of the size of the hole in relation to the volume of air. Might just make things more spatial ..... and let more road noise in.

Thought about turning the treble down ?
 

·
Registered
2000 E 320
Joined
·
16 Posts
I had this done in my 2000 w210 a while ago. To do it right you have to cut enough out to allow adequate air flow. If you have a 10" sub in your trunk then in order to get the right tone you have to figure out the area of the sub... I believe the formula is pi x r(squared). So in the case of the 10" it would be 3.14 x 5 squared. The total is 78.5 sq in. of area to allow for proper air flow. More would probably be O.K. but in the cases of less is a "bandpass" enclosure is created. Which unless designed with a port of adequate length and diameter the sound will not be tuned right.
 

·
Registered
2000 E 320
Joined
·
16 Posts
Also, what kind of sub do you have, what is the ohm load and the RMS(constant playing power)rating (not max) on the sub.
Typically an amp is designed for a 4 ohm mono, or 2 ohm stereo. In a 2 ohm mono hook up (2 subs both positives hooked to one positive terminal on the amp, and both negatives hooked to the other negative terminal) you will usually just about double the amps rated output power. Which for most subs 600-700 watts should be enough. This hook up is very hard on amps. The amp should have a built in protective switch that will shut the amp off until it cools down. But the safety switch doesnt always work in time and will fry the amp.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top