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Has anybody tried using other style Mercedes wheels on a different model that they didn't come on I have a 2012 GLK350 and had bought a set of rims off of a E55 AMG they are 5 by 1 1/2 bolt pattern which is the same for the GLK but there seems to either be a problem with the length of the lug bolt or maybe a speech sing issue or Hub bore can someone help me
 

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I believe all mercedes have the same bolt pattern and bore except the G-wagon.

Some variables between rims are the diameter, the width, ET, bolt diameter and bolt length.

What year did the E55 AMG wheels come off of? And what is a "speech sing issue"?

You really need to let us know the size and ET of both wheels. That information should be on the back side of the wheel.
 

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Has anybody tried using other style Mercedes wheels on a different model that they didn't come on I have a 2012 GLK350 and had bought a set of rims off of a E55 AMG they are 5 by 1 1/2 bolt pattern which is the same for the GLK but there seems to either be a problem with the length of the lug bolt or maybe a speech sing issue or Hub bore can someone help me
General recommendation, before you do anything your not familiar with, go to the forum for you model, and ask. Someone has done what your doing before and knows.

OK, the answer to your 1st question about cross swapping wheels across different models is YES, it's done all the time.

BUT, you need to understand what the 3 basic wheel sizes mean, and how they effect wheel fitment.

Did you know there are 3 basic wheels sizes, Width and diameter are commonly known, but OFFSET, also abbreviated as ET or E is just as important.

Offset is measured in mm, I don't know why, but it is. Each car model is designed for wheels within a certain offset range. Unfortunately, offset is not universal, if it were, then almost all wheels would be swap-able. Imagine looking at the wheel well from the front, it is a half-circle dome toping empty area inside the fenders where the wheel sits. Because of the suspension design for every car, a certain offset wheel is also designed to keep the wheel in the center of the wheel well. If that car is designed for et 50mm wheels, then a wheel with an offset of 25mm (SL wheel), will sit almost on the outer edge of the fender. Alternately if you tried to mount a wheel with ET 60, the wheel might rub the suspension. So each car has an ET sweet spot, and there is some tolerance plus or minus and will still fit. The amount of tolerance varies greatly between models. Older cars had narrow wheel wells and are not as tolerant to ET changes, new cars generally all have wider wheel wells, and to have a greater tolerance for ET differences.

Low numeric "offsets" push the wheel closer to the outside of the fenders. Numerically high "offsets" push the wheel closer to the suspension. You have seen a Jeep or 4-wheeler with the tires sticking outside the fenders I'm sure, those wheels would have an extreme offset with a very low ET number, perhaps even a negative number.

S class and G class models are designed to take wheels with offsets near 50mm. E class wheels, (211's in this case), are around 30mm. So you looking at putting a et30 wheel on a car that needs near et 50. There is always a tolerance you can take advantage of, but a et difference of 20mm is very large. in your case, 211 wheels "may" have the tires rubbing on the outside of the fenders. As was said by another poster, look at the size marking on the backside of the G wheels and the 211 wheels, they may look like this GLK = 17.5J x 17H2 et47.5, and the 211 wheel "may" look like this, 8J x 18H2 et30

Look here at this list of all Mercedes model wheels


As far as lug bolts, that's another issue when swapping wheels. Thread size, thread length, and ball seat size are the 3 measurements you need to understand,

The only lucky thing is that the wheels for a 211 and a glk are machined for the same diameter lug bolts, 14M diameter, and the same size ball-seat, R14. What can be vary different though is the shank length measured from the base of the ball seat to the tip of the bolt.

Because different style wheels are machined a little differently, again, the bolt length requirement can be very different.

The easiest way to check is with the wheel off the car, put a lug bolt into an empty hole and hold it there firmly, then measure the length of the threads sticking out the back side of the wheel, that measurement need to be between 17mm and 20mm, basically around 3/4". Less than that is unsafe, not enough threads grabbing, longer than that will (may) damage your emergency brakes on the back wheels.

I hope you didn't damage your emergency brakes, being long in the front isn't as critical. Also the hubs should all be the same 66.6mm I believe. Get a ruler out and measure the two different wheels.

One last consideration on some cars is the size of the brake calipers. Some cars require wheels designed to clear the larger size calipers. I am not familiar with GLK's, you should go to the GLK forum and ask all these questions.


But before you purchase another questionable item, get advice from your forum members before you buy.

Ironically enough, if you had purchased 212 wheels they would match all the measurements needed, the ET's are almost the same, go back to the list in the link and you will see this.

Attached is a simple drawing of two wheels, the one on the left has an offset(ET) of Zero, (0), the one on the right has an Offset of 58. An offset of 0mm means the wheel mounting surface is exactly on the centerline of the wheel. Plus or minu ET's are the deviation from that imaginary centerline of the wheel.
2609112

2609111


Good luck
 
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Hi guys, I just bought a 2015 GLK and the wheels installed by the previous owner are 7Jx17 ET49, with 16mm wheel spacers and 235/65 tyres. I looked online for the part number A1694012602 and these a B-class rims. The car drives fine, I like the softer ride on our bad roads, but are these rims suitable for my car? I imagine a GLK is much heavier than a B-class. Should I sell them and buy 17 inch rims made for GLK?
 

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It's the tire and not the rim that determines the load rating. The load rating for your tire is on the tire's side wall. I did a random comparison between 235/65/17 and 235/50/19 and the 17" tire actually has a higher load rating than the 19". Check your owner's manual for your vehicle requirement.
 

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General recommendation, before you do anything your not familiar with, go to the forum for you model, and ask. Someone has done what your doing before and knows.

OK, the answer to your 1st question about cross swapping wheels across different models is YES, it's done all the time.

BUT, you need to understand what the 3 basic wheel sizes mean, and how they effect wheel fitment.

Did you know there are 3 basic wheels sizes, Width and diameter are commonly known, but OFFSET, also abbreviated as ET or E is just as important.

Offset is measured in mm, I don't know why, but it is. Each car model is designed for wheels within a certain offset range. Unfortunately, offset is not universal, if it were, then almost all wheels would be swap-able. Imagine looking at the wheel well from the front, it is a half-circle dome toping empty area inside the fenders where the wheel sits. Because of the suspension design for every car, a certain offset wheel is also designed to keep the wheel in the center of the wheel well. If that car is designed for et 50mm wheels, then a wheel with an offset of 25mm (SL wheel), will sit almost on the outer edge of the fender. Alternately if you tried to mount a wheel with ET 60, the wheel might rub the suspension. So each car has an ET sweet spot, and there is some tolerance plus or minus and will still fit. The amount of tolerance varies greatly between models. Older cars had narrow wheel wells and are not as tolerant to ET changes, new cars generally all have wider wheel wells, and to have a greater tolerance for ET differences.

Low numeric "offsets" push the wheel closer to the outside of the fenders. Numerically high "offsets" push the wheel closer to the suspension. You have seen a Jeep or 4-wheeler with the tires sticking outside the fenders I'm sure, those wheels would have an extreme offset with a very low ET number, perhaps even a negative number.

S class and G class models are designed to take wheels with offsets near 50mm. E class wheels, (211's in this case), are around 30mm. So you looking at putting a et30 wheel on a car that needs near et 50. There is always a tolerance you can take advantage of, but a et difference of 20mm is very large. in your case, 211 wheels "may" have the tires rubbing on the outside of the fenders. As was said by another poster, look at the size marking on the backside of the G wheels and the 211 wheels, they may look like this GLK = 17.5J x 17H2 et47.5, and the 211 wheel "may" look like this, 8J x 18H2 et30

Look here at this list of all Mercedes model wheels


As far as lug bolts, that's another issue when swapping wheels. Thread size, thread length, and ball seat size are the 3 measurements you need to understand,

The only lucky thing is that the wheels for a 211 and a glk are machined for the same diameter lug bolts, 14M diameter, and the same size ball-seat, R14. What can be vary different though is the shank length measured from the base of the ball seat to the tip of the bolt.

Because different style wheels are machined a little differently, again, the bolt length requirement can be very different.

The easiest way to check is with the wheel off the car, put a lug bolt into an empty hole and hold it there firmly, then measure the length of the threads sticking out the back side of the wheel, that measurement need to be between 17mm and 20mm, basically around 3/4". Less than that is unsafe, not enough threads grabbing, longer than that will (may) damage your emergency brakes on the back wheels.

I hope you didn't damage your emergency brakes, being long in the front isn't as critical. Also the hubs should all be the same 66.6mm I believe. Get a ruler out and measure the two different wheels.

One last consideration on some cars is the size of the brake calipers. Some cars require wheels designed to clear the larger size calipers. I am not familiar with GLK's, you should go to the GLK forum and ask all these questions.


But before you purchase another questionable item, get advice from your forum members before you buy.

Ironically enough, if you had purchased 212 wheels they would match all the measurements needed, the ET's are almost the same, go back to the list in the link and you will see this.

Attached is a simple drawing of two wheels, the one on the left has an offset(ET) of Zero, (0), the one on the right has an Offset of 58. An offset of 0mm means the wheel mounting surface is exactly on the centerline of the wheel. Plus or minu ET's are the deviation from that imaginary centerline of the wheel.
View attachment 2609112
View attachment 2609111

Good luck

Hi AERO-- what a thorough explanation! Any chance you can offer some clarity on this please?


My oem chrome 17" rims on my 2006 w211 are starting to deteriorate and lead to slow leaks in the tires. I'm looking to replace them with stock alloy wheels and found a set of alloy ML430 rims in great shape that I'm considering buying.

Will 17" stock wheels from a 1999 ML430 fit the 2006 w211 without any problems? I believe the ML430 stock wheels are 17x8.5.

Will 245/45/17 tires fit stock ML430 17x8.5 wheels?

Thank you!

General recommendation, before you do anything your not familiar with, go to the forum for you model, and ask. Someone has done what your doing before and knows.

OK, the answer to your 1st question about cross swapping wheels across different models is YES, it's done all the time.

BUT, you need to understand what the 3 basic wheel sizes mean, and how they effect wheel fitment.

Did you know there are 3 basic wheels sizes, Width and diameter are commonly known, but OFFSET, also abbreviated as ET or E is just as important.

Offset is measured in mm, I don't know why, but it is. Each car model is designed for wheels within a certain offset range. Unfortunately, offset is not universal, if it were, then almost all wheels would be swap-able. Imagine looking at the wheel well from the front, it is a half-circle dome toping empty area inside the fenders where the wheel sits. Because of the suspension design for every car, a certain offset wheel is also designed to keep the wheel in the center of the wheel well. If that car is designed for et 50mm wheels, then a wheel with an offset of 25mm (SL wheel), will sit almost on the outer edge of the fender. Alternately if you tried to mount a wheel with ET 60, the wheel might rub the suspension. So each car has an ET sweet spot, and there is some tolerance plus or minus and will still fit. The amount of tolerance varies greatly between models. Older cars had narrow wheel wells and are not as tolerant to ET changes, new cars generally all have wider wheel wells, and to have a greater tolerance for ET differences.

Low numeric "offsets" push the wheel closer to the outside of the fenders. Numerically high "offsets" push the wheel closer to the suspension. You have seen a Jeep or 4-wheeler with the tires sticking outside the fenders I'm sure, those wheels would have an extreme offset with a very low ET number, perhaps even a negative number.

S class and G class models are designed to take wheels with offsets near 50mm. E class wheels, (211's in this case), are around 30mm. So you looking at putting a et30 wheel on a car that needs near et 50. There is always a tolerance you can take advantage of, but a et difference of 20mm is very large. in your case, 211 wheels "may" have the tires rubbing on the outside of the fenders. As was said by another poster, look at the size marking on the backside of the G wheels and the 211 wheels, they may look like this GLK = 17.5J x 17H2 et47.5, and the 211 wheel "may" look like this, 8J x 18H2 et30

Look here at this list of all Mercedes model wheels


As far as lug bolts, that's another issue when swapping wheels. Thread size, thread length, and ball seat size are the 3 measurements you need to understand,

The only lucky thing is that the wheels for a 211 and a glk are machined for the same diameter lug bolts, 14M diameter, and the same size ball-seat, R14. What can be vary different though is the shank length measured from the base of the ball seat to the tip of the bolt.

Because different style wheels are machined a little differently, again, the bolt length requirement can be very different.

The easiest way to check is with the wheel off the car, put a lug bolt into an empty hole and hold it there firmly, then measure the length of the threads sticking out the back side of the wheel, that measurement need to be between 17mm and 20mm, basically around 3/4". Less than that is unsafe, not enough threads grabbing, longer than that will (may) damage your emergency brakes on the back wheels.

I hope you didn't damage your emergency brakes, being long in the front isn't as critical. Also the hubs should all be the same 66.6mm I believe. Get a ruler out and measure the two different wheels.

One last consideration on some cars is the size of the brake calipers. Some cars require wheels designed to clear the larger size calipers. I am not familiar with GLK's, you should go to the GLK forum and ask all these questions.


But before you purchase another questionable item, get advice from your forum members before you buy.

Ironically enough, if you had purchased 212 wheels they would match all the measurements needed, the ET's are almost the same, go back to the list in the link and you will see this.

Attached is a simple drawing of two wheels, the one on the left has an offset(ET) of Zero, (0), the one on the right has an Offset of 58. An offset of 0mm means the wheel mounting surface is exactly on the centerline of the wheel. Plus or minu ET's are the deviation from that imaginary centerline of the wheel.
View attachment 2609112
View attachment 2609111

Good luck
 

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Will 17" stock wheels from a 1999 ML430 fit the 2006 w211 without any problems? I believe the ML430 stock wheels are 17x8.5
ML rims may not be a straight bolt on the W211. The ET is higher. The current size of your wheels will be on the back side of the rim.

 
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