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190E Benz
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Discussion Starter #1
Hi everyone [:)]
I was just wondering what problems these cars 'can' be prone to. Ive read in a few places that they are pretty reliable cars and dont tend to have too much that goes wrong but is there anything thats common to fault with them? Any help would be much appreciated!
Thanks in advance [:D]
 

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The "GENERAL"
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366 Posts
[8D]I will try to list a mechanical problem probability chart:

1. water pump failure- overheating

2. faulty relays- poor performance fuel usage

3. a/c problems- warm air when cold air is needed

4. fuel system breakdowns- pump, injectors etc.

5. electrical failures- altenator, starter, battery, various other shorts/opens

6. timing chain/guides- jumped timing problems

7. transmission- slippage or total failure

8. head gasket- overheating, exhaust componet damage

9. engine locking up- mainly due to massive neglect

10. any odds/ends I previously failed to mention...

[:)]As for the statement "they are pretty reliable cars and don't tend to have too much that goes wrong..." I totaly concur...

[8D] The only engineering I would have personaly changed for a fact, was having 100% power steering versus the power assisted steering... it takes a little getting use to...
 

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For me on a 190E 2.6 now with a 3.0L engine.

The problems went like this.


1. water pump failure- overheating
WHICH CAUSED
8. head gasket- overheating, exhaust componet damage.
GOT NEW ENGINE (1992 300E engine) AT AN EXPENSE OF $2200 Total

6 months later

7. transmission- slippage or TOTAL FAILURE.
EXPENSE OF $1100 to replace. (1990 300E transmission)

5 months of soild reliaility and now this month im back to square 1., literally.

1. water pump failure- overheating

I WAS SMART THIS TIME AND DIDNT DRIVE IT ANYMORE, TO SAVE THE HEAD GASKET.

Other than replacing the entire drivetrain, this car is very reliable lol
[:(!]

ANDY
 

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The "GENERAL"
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Sorry for the "new miserable experience", or excuse me the "old miserable experience"...

Truthfully it is written that head gaskets can blow at any time without cause or without warning...

In numerous years of motor-o-vating [knock on wood] I have never suffered this type of causualty... There is of course tomorrow and all it has to offer...

Most cars on the highway will give miles upon miles of good service if maintained properly...

Other cars are destined for the looming "black hole" of repair shop misery costing their owners dearly as though an evil curse be upon them...

Anyway going to jump track here...
 

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190E Benz
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109 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
can someone tell me what grade oil the 190E's take? My car desperatly needs an oil change! [:0]
 

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2002 E430 4MATIC
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Well, you should use a reputable brand of oil, i like mobile 1 (since thats what the new MB's use) or valvoline. As for weight, look in the manual under oil reccommendation and then find the correct weight for the average temperature. You are pretty safe with 10w30 or 5w30 most of the year.
 

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'91 190E 2.6
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10 Posts
The only things that i have had to replace on my '91 is the water pump and the injectors and the car has 193K miles. I am the third owner though and the previous owner had the engine rebuilt at 80K.
 

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w201 190D
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my car has 300.000 km, no replacements or problems until now
 

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2004 C230 Kompressor Sport
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Then I suppose my 190D 2.5 can go upto 400,000 miles, since the engine rpm is much lower than a Gasoline one.

It pacified me a little although I already spend $2500 on the car I bought for $3000, from online auction. Caution with auction, although it looks good, too many hidden from the eyes of the mere mortal.
 

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chris
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89_190e_2.6 - 6/27/2004 7:34 AM

[8D]I will try to list a mechanical problem probability chart:

1. water pump failure- overheating

2. faulty relays- poor performance fuel usage

3. a/c problems- warm air when cold air is needed

4. fuel system breakdowns- pump, injectors etc.

5. electrical failures- altenator, starter, battery, various other shorts/opens

6. timing chain/guides- jumped timing problems

7. transmission- slippage or total failure

8. head gasket- overheating, exhaust componet damage

9. engine locking up- mainly due to massive neglect

10. any odds/ends I previously failed to mention...

[:)]As for the statement "they are pretty reliable cars and don't tend to have too much that goes wrong..." I totaly concur...

[8D] The only engineering I would have personaly changed for a fact, was having 100% power steering versus the power assisted steering... it takes a little getting use to...
a bit over the top there mate they are good solid cars with good reliability if looked after like any other car
 

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w201 190D
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248 Posts
"if looked after like any other car"

there u got the point, a good and reliable doesnt stays a good and reliable car without good service.
 

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The "GENERAL"
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Decided it would be reasonable to expound on item #6...

6. timing chain/guides- jumped timing problems...

Be it known and fully understood for all mb enthusiasts... that if any mb engine is driven until the timing chain gives up the ghost... the engine will cross the threshold of self destruct mode...

Reason being when the timing chain breaks... valve timing is instantly lost... causing the pistons to slam the valves... camshaft to be busted off the head... and various other sorts of unpleasant surprises... depending mainly on engine speed at the time of catastrophe...

[any overhead cam style engine will react in this manner...]

Conclusion- if any worthy mb tech suggests its time to change the timing chain/guides hear them out...[?]
 

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The only things i have had to do with my 190E is replace the head gasket, that was $1500, but besides that, i couldnt be happier with my car. I really need to get a pic :) i just washed it.
 

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The "GENERAL"
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Time to expound on another proverbial mercedes benz fault...

#10. any odds/ends I previously failed to mention...

THE INGNITION LOCK REARS ITS UGLY HEAD THEORY...
Be it known and fully understood there are two types of dedicated mb drivers...

Those that have suffered the ignition lock fiasco... and those who will...

It occurs one day when least expected... you jump in your little fine example of "Bavarian* engineering" when it seems as though nothing you can do this side of eternity will turn the key to the start position...

Cruel joke..? No! Didn't pay your dues..? Maybe!

This is dedicated to all those who thought their key would last forever... or that the mb ignition lock would last forever...

If you are extremely fortunate you will still have the valet key [in like new condition] in your possession... and it will manage to entice the "tumbler" to the start position... if so consider it a ray of light, in an ever increasingly dark world...

If the tumbler can be moved to the #1 detent position the cost of estimated repairs hovers @$100 USD...

If the tumbler can not be moved from the off, "stop the theif" position the cost of repair just shot to @$700+ USD... due to massive drilling/removal costs...

If the owners manuals advice of changing the lock and keys, were followed in the first place, the fiasco should "theoretically never occur..." but who faithfully follows the owners manual advice to the letter..?

*Bavarian- "I just love those Bavarians, [because] they are so meticulous.."

P.S. Imagine for a moment purchasing an auctioned mb only to find that the ignition monster is in full effect... i.e. the tumbler will not turn to the #1 detent position..?

key search words for future reference- (disregard theory...)
steering wheel lock / ignition lock / key tumbler / key barrel / key locks / door locks / nightmare on your street / entering the twighlight zone / bad luck /cruel world / abject misery ///
 

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1990 190e 2.6 150k
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you speak the truth my friend. A week after having bought my 190, the ignition lock locked. when i took it to the guy i bought it from, he said he had recently replaced the mechanism...but further inspection shows he bought it used from a junkyard!

All was well though, he's a mechanic and he chiseled it out for free for me, and only charged for the replacement.
 

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The "GENERAL"
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DIESEL ENGINE RUNAWAY FIASCO... [explained]

#10. any odds/ends I previously failed to mention...

This article is dedicated to older MB diesel owner/operators... a copy can be printed and retained in the owners manuals / repair manuals et cetera for future refference...

As the world demand for petroleum products increases more persons worldwide will desire and operate diesel powered vehicles to offset price increases in fuel costs...

As these engines age and inevitably wear out there will occur a unique failure that diesel engines are "prone" to...

Please read to be informed:

RUNAWAY DIESEL ENGINE THEORY EXPOUNDED UPON...


"...DIESEL ENGINE INFORMATION FROM MEMBER- n5160u..."
Location: Hayweird, CA

"...This is a known problem with diesels. It is not just turbos that have the problem but a turbo can make it far worse. There is no throttle in a diesel as there is in a gasser [gas powered engine]. A diesel will always take as much air as it can. The throttle on a diesel controls how much fuel is injected and this is where the problem occurs...

There is no way to shut off the ignition:

Because its from compression and the normal way to shut down a diesel engine is by shutting off the fuel. If you have an oil leak in the turbo, a plugged CCV system, "a badly worn engine" with lots of blowby or worn "valve guide seals" that allow oil to pass you will have the recipie for a runaway. All it takes is the addition of a restricted or dirty airfilter and the final step in setting up this condition is in place.

What happens is that any of these conditions will allow an engine that can build enough vacuum, to ingest engine oil on the intake stroke and run or even- "accelerate"...

"...Once this condition occurs the engine may start a runaway condition using its own oil supply until it over revs and blows up or it runs out of fuel in which case a full crankcase is sufficient to give you a pretty wild ride..."


Please note that the problem discussed here only applies to diesel engines... "Runaway diesels are caused by unwanted oil in the intake manifold being used as fuel..." A turbo can make the situation worse only because it can be the source of a large quantity of oil if it has an internal oil seal failure but it still takes a moderate vaccum in the intake manifold to allow the engine to ingest the oil and a healthy diesel with a closed throttle should not generate sufficient vaccum to do this.

As I mentioned before it is a known problem with "ALL" diesels. A worn engine with a dirty airfilter or restricted air intake system is a runaway waiting to happen.

If you want to keep a turbo diesel healthy regular oil changes are mandatory and you should only use synthetic because it can handle higher temps better. Always let the engine idle for a few seconds before shutting down. Turbos will still be turning at several thousand rpm even at idle with no boost and may be running a lot faster if you just ran up the driveway before shutting down. Remember when the engine stops, the oil pressure will drop to zero with the turbo still at speed.

A small wait before shutting down lets the turbo unspool and also allows the bearings and seals a little more time to cool before the oil flow stops. Additionally dino oil tends to turn into carbon deposits when left to heat soak on the shaft seals and bearings after the oil stops moving.

I would suspect that since the problem occured more than once before the accident the "mechanic didn't know squat about diesels" because the first sign of unintended acceleration in a diesel is a really big red flag that should not be ignored because you usually don't get a second chance before something really dramatic happens.

That said, because there aren't all that many Benz diesels still running out there it is difficult to find any auto mechanics skilled in working on them because they just don't see enough of them often enough to keep knowlegable and current. I have owned mostly diesel powered cars since the mid seventies and over the years I have come to accept the fact that I have to do most of the routine maintanance myself because "most shops lack the tools and parts to even attempt something as simple as an oil change..."

Your best defense against a runaway is a clean intake system and air filter. If you have a turbo it also helps to remove the flexable air ducting on both sides of the intercooler once in awhile to check for an oil build up. There will always be a small amount of oil there because it is the nature of turbos to pass some oil and oil vapor does condense in there too. What you don't want to find but you are looking for is sufficient oil to fill a small cup. That much oil means the intercooler has never been cleaned or its the first sign the turbo shaft seals are starting to fail..."

Whole exerpt taken from another posting by member "n5160u"

"...Thanks "n5160u"...now when someone speaks of the [elusive?] runaway diesel concept I am better informed to speculate on failure analysis with them..." quote by 89_190e_2.6
 

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The "GENERAL"
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Not trying to confuse anyone...

There are multiple scenarios that can make a faulty diesel engine go into uncontrolled acceleration...

1.faulty cruise control...

2.faulty injector pump / shut off valve / governor...

3.engine oil inadvertantly being drawn into the combustion chambers...

4.faulty leaking injecters...


"...gee...leaking injectors...lean?? make any sense? no . by the way...leaking injectors means fuel- more fuel....runaway benz.....look out...Hope your fuel shut off lever works!!!........the valves were too tight........ quote by BENZDOC*..."

*BENZDOC= Mercedes Benz Doctor



***
 

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190E Benz
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Discussion Starter #19
I had a mercedes mechanic have a quick look at my car a couple of days ago.. He says its quite good apart from the fact the water pump will need replacing soon (it has started making some noise, but its not too bad at this stage), and that the timing chain will also need replacing as its also making some noise. He's gonna replace a few other odds and ends for me at the same time, costing me roughly $1200 AUD. Perhaps not quite as expensive as i thought it was going to be? Im just really paranoid drivin it round at the moment with knowing these things need replacing.. I cant afford to get them done for a month or two yet [:(] Its getting an oil change in the next few days, will that quieten the timing chain down a bit?
 

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190e 2.0 litre Euro
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I would wonder about the need to replace the chain, what year is your model? After '88 they came with a duplex chain which really should last as long as you do! Assuming car has had a few oil changes down the years. The chain tensioner on the other hand should be changed thats proberly making some front end noise.

Mike.
 
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