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1999 S420; 2007 S600
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Discussion Starter #1
When removing/replacing camshaft adjuster magnets on a M119 engine, is there any special procedure required, such as rotating the engine to TDC? Or is it a simple bolt-off bolt-on job?

Thanks,
Andy
 

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1997 S600 (sold)
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You mean the solenoids (round gold things with 2-wire connectors) on the front of the cam towers, right? Bolt off, bolt on.

Brett
 

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1997 S600 (sold)
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Sealant. I popped mine off, and they seemed to have a hardened sealant used on the mating surface. So I used a hardening gasket sealant on them, but I don't think I did a very good job of it. They seem to be leaking quite a bit, now. They are definitely leaking from around the electrical connector, but may now also be leaking from the mating surface since the time I took them off and put them back. I may not have put enough sealant on it.

Anyway, I'm in the middle of pulling the intake to replace the valve cover gaskets (much bigger job than it was supposed to be when a couple of intake plenum bolts stripped, and a ball allen tool snapped off in another bolt, ugh), but back on topic... and I'm debating replacing the solenoids. I think there may be a seal where the camshafts exit the cam towers where the solenoid covers it up. I would not think there should be oil behind the solenoid, but I'm not 100% sure on what is there. If there's a seal, I'll replace it and keep the solenoids. A new seal should stop any leaking.

Brett
 

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1997 S600 (sold)
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Your favorite brand and kind. It probably doesn't really matter that much. This looks nice from Permatex:

http://www.permatex.com/products/Automotive/automotive_gasketing/anaerobic_gasket_makers/auto_Permatex_High_Temperature_Anaerobic_Flange_Sealant.htm

But, when I removed mine, I had to chip off whatever was on there from the factory. It was pretty hard material. I tried to use something similar. I don't remember what I used. May have been the super high tack stuff from Permatex:

http://www.permatex.com/products/Automotive/automotive_gasketing/gasket_sealants/Permatex_Super_High_Tack_Gasket_Sealant.htm

Brett
 

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600SEL
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The sealant to use is Loctite 5900. And there is no seal in the covers on the intake camshafts. The seals are only on the exhaust camshafts behind the distributors, but you don't have them either.
 

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Loctite 5900 is an RTV silicone "flange sealant." So that or a similar flange sealant will be good.

Thanks, myarmar. I didn't look closely when I had the solenoids off several years ago, but I don't recall seeing an obvious seal behind the solenoid, so I guess it is the solenoids that are responsible for keeping the oil in the engine. Leaking from around the electrical connector probably means new solenoids if you want to stop the leak, then. I'll examine it and see if there may be hope of gooping the inside of the solenoid with a silicone sealant to stop leaking, but I'm not optimistic.

Brett
 

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Maybe that's why mines throwing a code if its leaking thru the solenoid. My connection was a little greasy.
Where should the sealant be placed? (I haven't seen it off my car yet sorry)

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Discussion Starter #12
There's just a big flat torus-shaped surface on the back of the thing. Three screws - I think they're allen-head screws? And pry it off.

My connectors were also a little greasy. They're sealed up nice and tight on the 420 but on the 500 there is some seeping oil residue, particularly on the left (driver's side) bank. I don't know if it's coming from behind that solenoid or the valve cover gasket, which I replaced right after I bought the car.

Different line of questioning - what would be the expected behavior if one of the adjuster magnets failed?
 

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1997 S600 (sold)
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Maybe that's why mines throwing a code if its leaking thru the solenoid. My connection was a little greasy.
Where should the sealant be placed? (I haven't seen it off my car yet sorry)

Sent from my SGH-T989 using AutoGuide.Com Free App
What code are you talking about?

The only "monitoring" that I could imagine the computer doing for these solenoids is whether they have gone open-circuit. There are no other sensors that I'm aware of. For example, I don't think the computer knows whether the camshaft is in one position or another. (There are only two positions of the cam that are switched between by the action of the solenoid.) I believe that the computer can only infer what position the cam should be in by knowing whether it is energizing the solenoid or not, but it doesn't have a way of independently verifying whether the cam has actually responded to the solenoid.

Brett
 

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1997 S600 (sold)
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Different line of questioning - what would be the expected behavior if one of the adjuster magnets failed?
That's a good question, and I think the answer is almost imperceptible change (but, I reserve the right to be wrong). The idea of variable valve timing is to optimize valve timing at different rpm ranges so that you get an engine with good top-end power at high rpm as well as good fuel economy at moderate rpm. So, depending on which position the cam is "stuck" in you'd get a loss of one of those. I can't recall the "direction" of the timing change on the intake cam, but I recall there are two rpm spots where the timing is supposed to change so that the mid-rpm range gets one timing and the low and high rpm ranges get the other. I don't remember if the mid-rpm range is retarded or advanced.

Brett
 

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94 S420 RIP 2/8/13 02 ML55AMG, 06 CLS55AMG, 89 Mas. 228, 84 Por. 911 Carrera, 93 Toyota t.t. Supra
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Do these camshaft sensors have any impact on the ignition or distribution of spark or timing?
 

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What code are you talking about?

The only "monitoring" that I could imagine the computer doing for these solenoids is whether they have gone open-circuit. There are no other sensors that I'm aware of. For example, I don't think the computer knows whether the camshaft is in one position or another. (There are only two positions of the cam that are switched between by the action of the solenoid.) I believe that the computer can only infer what position the cam should be in by knowing whether it is energizing the solenoid or not, but it doesn't have a way of independently verifying whether the cam has actually responded to the solenoid.

Brett
I don't think it was ever implemented on any MB engines, but there is a DTC P1341. Here is a description from MB OBD2 manual dated 1/95.
 

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P1519 for me. Came back twice.
First time I cleaned it up then reset but came back after that. No check engine light but it did pop up on code reader.

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P1519 for me. Came back twice.
First time I cleaned it up then reset but came back after that. No check engine light but it did pop up on code reader.

Sent from my SGH-T989 using AutoGuide.Com Free App
OK, apparently my OBD2 manual is outdated. The WIS has code P1519 with same description as P1341.
 

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So I was wrong. The computer can tell if the camshaft has switched position using manifold absolute pressure. I learned something today. Cool.

So tackleberry, I don't know if there is a different code for the solenoid being open circuit, but I would first check the continuity of the suspect solenoid.

Brett
 
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