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Outstanding Contributor Always Remembered RI
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Discussion Starter #1
Sheesh, I thought you had lost it guys but finally back on the road again eh.
 

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Outstanding Contributor Always Remembered RI
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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Obviously playing a ban jo.
YUPGeorge Formby – the ukulele-playing Lancashire icon, with the slicked-back Brycreem hair, and tombstone tooth grin, as wide as the grille on a Yankee Buick – was such a household word, in the 30s and 40s, his name tripped off your tongue faster than OK Sauce, or Coleman’s Mustard.

He was a movie star, when we called them ‘Talkies’, and George and His Ukulele were hot properties in the entertainment industry, because both had a grip on the public at large, stronger than Hitler, Churchill and the whole cabbage patch of politicians put together, because both gave everyone hope and happiness, in times of great depression.

His saucy songs, and sharp eye for satire, which he cloaked in a veil of exaggerated innocence, were 'bang-on-target' for the era in which they existed...and his public knew that, and loved him for it.


Today, his naive suggestiveness, and double entendre would be laughed off the stage; but this was another time; another place; when the public were not receptive to today's 'full frontal vulgarity'; and when Formby - without the slightest hint of obscenity - was undisputed King of the Muck Heap!

Born in Wigan, Lancashire (now Greater Manchester), on May 26, 1904, George was the second child of the legendary Edwardian Music Hall star, George Formby Snr. Their first child did not survive, but several brothers and sisters came after George.
 

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YUPGeorge Formby – the ukulele-playing Lancashire icon, with the slicked-back Brycreem hair, and tombstone tooth grin, as wide as the grille on a Yankee Buick – was such a household word, in the 30s and 40s, his name tripped off your tongue faster than OK Sauce, or Coleman’s Mustard.

He was a movie star, when we called them ‘Talkies’, and George and His Ukulele were hot properties in the entertainment industry, because both had a grip on the public at large, stronger than Hitler, Churchill and the whole cabbage patch of politicians put together, because both gave everyone hope and happiness, in times of great depression.

His saucy songs, and sharp eye for satire, which he cloaked in a veil of exaggerated innocence, were 'bang-on-target' for the era in which they existed...and his public knew that, and loved him for it.


Today, his naive suggestiveness, and double entendre would be laughed off the stage; but this was another time; another place; when the public were not receptive to today's 'full frontal vulgarity'; and when Formby - without the slightest hint of obscenity - was undisputed King of the Muck Heap!

Born in Wigan, Lancashire (now Greater Manchester), on May 26, 1904, George was the second child of the legendary Edwardian Music Hall star, George Formby Snr. Their first child did not survive, but several brothers and sisters came after George.

The whole article:

George Formby
 

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Outstanding Contributor Always Remembered RI
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52,804 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
The whole article:

George Formby
Just gotta love this guy;

Perhaps the shrewdest move of all, ever undertaken by Beryl, was to demand that every time one of George films was shown, he should get 25 per cent of the net showing fee. In that way, Beryl ensured that while George lived, he 'reaped while he slept', and, as far as I am aware, his estate is still benefiting by that arrangement, today.

So, mindful of that, it would be nice to think that George is really having the last laugh; smiling down from some ethereal balcony, and commenting to Beryl, his canny spouse: "It's turned out nice again..hasn't it ?".
 
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