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I currently have a 490 hp custom tuned CLK that is the shop getting repaired after a slght mishap. I'm planning on getting a cruiser to keep me in check. I'm not happy with my 2000 E320 so I'm thinking about going retro. I have been offered a 1993 500SEC with 95K miles for almost no cost (from a relative). The car runs beautifully and has been kept in great condition I'm considering taking the car and putting about $25K in mods to get it looking super sharp and running a little stronger. What do you all think... I think it's a no brainer. To me the car has a classic body and a solid engine.
 

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The car is an expensive one to maintain, I am a dealer and everytime I almost buy one for nothing<br> my service dept. talks me out of it
 

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1993 Mercedes-Benz 500 SEC
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Find out what works and what doesn't

Rich, the 500 SEC is a superb example of german engineering at its peak, but the S Class has some finicky things about it and the drive train should be absolutely solid for you to consider it. Typical things to check: (1) rear suspension: by this time you may be looking at those expensive ($500+ ea.) self-leveling rear shocks plus the "accumulators" ($100+ ea.) to restore that awesome ride quality. (2) Check the front ball joints, controller arms etc. for wear as well. (3) Vacuum pump: this controls your "auto-suck" doors and rear lid, plus the "auto-fit" windows that tighten after you close the door(s). (4) Listen for "tappet clack", a top-end repair that will set you back $500-800. (5) Tires/Brake pads: don't forget 'em, this is a 5000-lb monster that can take/make a lot of damage if you can't control a panic stop. (6) AC: Should freeze you like a Wisconsin icehouse in January; if it doesn't, check to make sure you won't need to pull the dash to replace those exotic a/c components. (7) check the sunroof - gently: early 90's models (at least) tend to run off their rails, requiring an update/replacement kit that can run hundreds to repair. (8) check for leaks: power steering, oil, xmission fluid, etc.

Hey, if you're satisfied that you can get out with a few grand or less to restore your coupe, I'd say do it, and good luck. Then baby it.
 
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