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280GE 1989
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Discussion Starter #1
Hi everyone,

following a leakage and an almost complete drainage of the brake fluid on the rear right wheel of my '89 280GE a few months ago, the mechanic found that brake cylinder to be completely worn out and replaced it. The brakes were back to normal and I never had any issues or leakages since.

When I went to renew my car's registration a couple of days ago, it failed the brake test repeatedly because the braking force on the left wheel of the rear axle is consistently twice as high as on the right (where the new cylinder is fitted).

My question is: are there any adjustments to be made on the individual brake cylinder/assembly for the rear axle or are they self-adjusting? If not, what could be a potential cause of this abnormal distribution?

:surrender:
 

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'91 G300D SWB Manual, '99 ML320 7 seater
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Dany said:
Hi everyone,

following a leakage and an almost complete drainage of the brake fluid on the rear right wheel of my '89 280GE a few months ago, the mechanic found that brake cylinder to be completely worn out and replaced it. The brakes were back to normal and I never had any issues or leakages since.

When I went to renew my car's registration a couple of days ago, it failed the brake test repeatedly because the braking force on the left wheel of the rear axle is consistently twice as high as on the right (where the new cylinder is fitted).

My question is: are there any adjustments to be made on the individual brake cylinder/assembly for the rear axle or are they self-adjusting? If not, what could be a potential cause of this abnormal distribution?

:surrender:
After any operation in the rear brakes and right after assembly, one needs to readjust the brake shoes by turning the adjusting screws at the bottom of the brake plate. Adjust to a clearance of 0.3 mm (+- 1mm) between brake drum and shoes, measured with a feeler gauge at the windows at the top of the brake plate.

Afterwards, you have to carry out 5 brake applications in forward and 5 in reverse so that front and rear shoes get properly adjusted.
 

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280GE 1989
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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks a lot Mortinson!
The Cylinder was replaced over 6 months ago, so I assumed the brakes should normally have self-adjusted by now...
So what I need to do is readjust the brakes to the clearance you mentioned using the screw and then apply the brakes a few times going forward & reverse?
 

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After any operation in the rear brakes and right after assembly, one needs to readjust the brake shoes by turning the adjusting screws at the bottom of the brake plate. Adjust to a clearance of 0.3 mm (+- 1mm) between brake drum and shoes, measured with a feeler gauge at the windows at the top of the brake plate.

Afterwards, you have to carry out 5 brake applications in forward and 5 in reverse so that front and rear shoes get properly adjusted.

Hi can you send me again the explantion to solve this problem I have the same problem. on my 1993 w463 5doors GE200 ITALY

thanks a lot
Francesco
 

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'04 G55 '80 280GE '99 S420 '98 E320 2011 E350 2016 GLA250
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96 G300DT
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Another thing to consider on any older vehicle is that the brake lines could have collapsed internally. They swell inside and restrict fluid flow. Whether they are collapsed or not, you really should replace flex lines every 15 years of so. Life is short enough as it is.
 
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