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2006 E350
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all,

I have gone through past posts and have learned much of the hydralic torque converter / clutch system on my 406 tug. Thanks for the past posts.

I have a clutch pedal that takes considerable preasure to push in, (and it goes in very slowly and evenly), I place in gear, let the clutch out (pedal returns to rest quickly), then takes approximately 6 seconds for the 406 to start moving. Adding more throttle doesn't make it engage any quicker. I'm going to try to figure out how to bleed the system today, as this is my first Mog, and I need to order a Manual tomorrow.

Is the 6 second delay normal?

Chris
 

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mogless, except for my friends MB4-94. And a bunch of other diesel junk.
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1984 Mercedes 280GE LWB
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Hello all,

I have gone through past posts and have learned much of the hydralic torque converter / clutch system on my 406 tug. Thanks for the past posts.

I have a clutch pedal that takes considerable preasure to push in, (and it goes in very slowly and evenly), I place in gear, let the clutch out (pedal returns to rest quickly), then takes approximately 6 seconds for the 406 to start moving. Adding more throttle doesn't make it engage any quicker. I'm going to try to figure out how to bleed the system today, as this is my first Mog, and I need to order a Manual tomorrow.

Is the 6 second delay normal?

Chris
I have the torque converter transmission in my '75 406 and the clutch pedal should feel like any other with no unique delay. It's just that you need to apply accelerator pedal pressure before your truck moves out very fast. What happens if you come to a stop without de clutching? It should just come to a normal stop and then accelerate away again when you hit the gas pedal.
 

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78 406
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251 Posts
Yup, you got a swollen hose on your clutch, time to build one of these bleeder You may want to replace the rubber parts in the slave cylinder also, if the bore is good and clean, if not you will need the whole new cylinder. Mine blew out on the trail. These trucks aren't to bad without a clutch, they start up in gear real nice, but getting into high gears with not so good syncros can be tough. I put some of my spare wheel cylinder cups in to get my clutch going while I got the right parts, that worked great. I don't have the torque convertor, just the regular double clutch
 

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2006 E350
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38 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Just got in from the garage. Thanks for the responses.

I traced out the clutch hydraulic lines and found the slave cylinder under the rubber boot cover for all the shift levers. I watched the slave cylinder push the throwout bearing lever as I pushed on the clutch pedal...It takes about 8 seconds for me to get the pedal to the floor. Then when I release it the pedal pops right back up but the throwout bearing lever slowly returns back...about 6 seconds. I bled the line and nothing has changed, however I noticed that when the throwout bearing lever is engaged and I crack the slave cylinder breeder, the bearing lever pops instantly back to rest position. I do believe that the issue is between the master cylinder and slave cylinder.

Would the swollen hose problem be noticeable to the eye? How do I isolate this problem further?

Chris
 

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78 406
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251 Posts
You simply have a swollen hose, very common on machines this old. No you can't see it from the outside. You need a new hose, that is all there is to it. The operation of bleeding like you did is the test for this condition.
 

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2006 E350
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38 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks, I'll replace both flex hoses (one up front and one at the slave cylinder) and get a repair manual while I'm at it.

Chris
 
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