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post #1 of 4 (permalink) Old 05-12-2006, 05:25 PM Thread Starter
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Talking Front Brakes...

I am going to changing my front brake pads soon for my 2001 C320. I have changed pads on Hondas, Toyotas, and many GM cars.

Is there anything I should be aware of before I start? Like, do I need a special tool for taking off the caliper?

Second, what kind of pad selections are available outside of MB OEM pads?

Have a great day

2001 Mercedes C320
2001 BMW 325i
1975 Dodge B200 w/ slant six
1960 Ford Ranchero
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post #2 of 4 (permalink) Old 05-12-2006, 05:48 PM
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MB brakes are as easy or easier than other makes. There is a brake wear sensor that's pops in a pad. If the sensor has been triggered (the pad wear light came on), then you need to buy a new one. If you are concerned with dust, the lowest dust pads I've tried are the Porterfield. They have good braking performance and the fronts will dust as much as the factory pads do in the rear. If saving money is top priority, check out pads from Mintex, Pagid, Textar as these are OEM companies for MB. Some have said that they dust the same, some say less.

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post #3 of 4 (permalink) Old 05-15-2006, 11:31 PM
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I've got porterfield R4S and absolutely love them. I may try Hawk HP-S pads in the future (which is pretty soon!) and if they perform as well as the porterfields, they're another cheaper alternative.

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post #4 of 4 (permalink) Old 05-16-2006, 09:04 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by billyons
I am going to changing my front brake pads soon for my 2001 C320. I have changed pads on Hondas, Toyotas, and many GM cars.

Is there anything I should be aware of before I start? Like, do I need a special tool for taking off the caliper?

Second, what kind of pad selections are available outside of MB OEM pads?

Have a great day

You don't need any special tool, you can use Mintex or Axxis, they got two types one is Deluxe Plus pads are perfect if you are looking for an extremely low dust pad that is also very quiet and rotor friendly, yet has the grip and fade resistance required for performance cars. These organic pads continue to work well at temperatures up to 716 °F, similar to OEM pads. The only thing you give up is the dust! So stop washing brake dust off your wheels every few days without giving up any braking performance. and Ultimate pads use a Kevlar and ceramic strengthened formula for enhanced performance. Not considered a low-dust pad, but usually produces slightly less dust than original factory pads. The Ultimates produce maximum braking friction when cold, yet have tremendous fade resistance at temperatures up to 932 °F. The coefficient of friction is high enough to produce a noticeable reduction in brake pedal effort over stock pads. Fine for autocross or for your first track event or driving school, assuming street tires and a low to medium horsepower car. Once you make the jump to Intermediate level, and certainly if you use R-compound race tires, then we recommend moving up to dedicated race pads.

And above above all you need to bed-in your new brakes after you change it:

If you've installed a big brake kit, changed your pads and rotors, or even just purchased a brand new car, you should "bed" the brakes in by following the instructions below. Proper bedding will improve pedal feel, reduce or eliminate brake squeal, and extend the life of your pads and rotors. Because bedding increases the emissivity of the rotors, it even allows them to shed more heat via radiation, making them run slightly cooler. For more on the theory of bedding, please refer to this excellent article by StopTech: Removing the Mystery from Brake Pad Bed-In.

Caution: When you've just installed new pads/rotors or a big brake kit, the first few applications of the brake pedal will result in almost no braking power. Gently apply the brakes a few times at low speed in order to build up some grip before blasting down the road at high speed. Otherwise, you may be in for a nasty surprise the first time you hit the brakes at 60 mph.

When following these instructions, please avoid doing it in the presence of other vehicles. Breaking in your new pads and rotors is often best done very early in the morning, since other drivers will have no idea what you are up to and will respond in a variety of ways ranging from fear to curiosity to aggression. And an officer of the law will probably not understand when you try to explain why you were driving erratically! Zeckhausen Racing does not endorse speeding on public roads and takes no responsibility for any injuries or tickets you may receive while following these instructions.

1. From a speed of about 60mph, gently apply the brakes to slow the car down to about 45mph, then accelerate back up to 60mph and repeat. Do this couple of times to bring the brakes up to operating temperature. This prevents you from thermally shocking the rotors and pads in the next steps.

2. Make a series of eight near-stops from 60 to about 10 mph. Do it HARD by pressing on the brakes firmly, just shy of locking the wheels or engaging ABS. At the end of each slowdown, immediately accelerate back to 60mph. DO NOT COME TO A COMPLETE STOP! If you stop completely and sit for any length of time with your foot on the brake pedal, you will imprint pad material onto the hot rotors, which can lead to vibration, uneven braking, and could even ruin the rotors. (Note: With some less aggressive street pads, you may need to do fewer than eight near-stops. If your pedal gets soft or you feel the brakes going away, then you've done enough. Proceed to the next step.)

3. The brakes may begin to fade slightly after the 7th or 8th near-stop. This fade will stabilize, but not completely go away until the brakes have fully cooled. A strong smell from the brakes, and even smoke, is normal

4. After the 8th near-stop, accelerate back up to speed and cruise for a while, using the brakes as little as possible. The brakes need 5 to 10 minutes to cool down. Try not to become trapped in traffic or come to a complete stop while the brakes are still hot.

5. If club race pads, such as Hawk Blue, are being used, add four near-stops from 80 to 10mph. If full race pads, such as Performance Friction 01 or Hawk HT 14, are being used, add four near-stops from 100 to 10 mph.

6. After the break-in cycle, there should be a slight blue tint and a light gray film on the rotor face. The blue tint tells you the rotor has reached break-in temperature and the gray film is pad material starting to transfer onto the rotor face. This is what you are looking for. The best braking occurs when there is an even layer of of pad material deposited across the face of the rotors. This minimizes squealing, increases braking torque, and maximizes pad and rotor life.

7. After the first break in cycle shown above, the brakes may still not be fully broken in. A second bed-in cycle, AFTER the brakes have cooled down fully from the first cycle, may be necessary before the brakes really start to perform well. This is especially true if you have installed new pads on old rotors. If you've just installed a big brake kit, the pedal travel may not feel as firm as you expected. After the second cycle, the pedal will become noticeably firmer. If necessary, bleed the brakes to improve pedal firmness.

hope this one help you.

Joseph


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Last edited by JOE55; 05-16-2006 at 09:06 AM.
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