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post #1 of 17 (permalink) Old 01-07-2019, 04:01 AM Thread Starter
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Question Camper Dimensions?

Hi all, 👋🏻😎

I was wondering if you could help me figure out the dimensions of our (hopefully) to be Unimog Camper Box. I've found some dimensions, and the most accurate ones are in the Atlas 4x4 product catalogue. I've rudely ripped the drawings from there and put them in the attached PNG and PDF.

The dimensions in the documents are:
Height: 2125mm (orange arrows)
Length: 3600mm (red arrows)
Width: 2250mm (blue arrows)

What do you think of these dimensions? What are your camper dimensions?

We're still in very early planning stages, but we're thinking of building the box ourselves, so we can have quite a lot of flexibility in the design (simpler is obviously better).

I've also seen quite a few photos of Unimog Campers with Luton / Over cab boxes and I've been assured that you do not really need to tilt the cab so you can build a structure above the cab without any major problems. Thoughts on this? I've kind of reserved the roof for a spare and a storage box.

As for our usage, we're just the two of us and as such we'd like a permanent bed, seating for 2 comfortably, and temporarily two-ish guests. We're planning on full time living in the vehicle so we'll need to be able to work on our computers comfortably. We might also have to sit out bad weather etc, so longer times spent inside is a likely scenario. We're also considering taking two small motorbikes with us (Honda Groms, for example) as our current bikes are way too big (BMW F800GS'). They'd be hung on the back as per the norm. Due to this I'm considering a rack that can be used in at least two positions (high/low) depending on what departure angle is needed. Spare tyre will probably go on the cab roof, and if a 2nd spare is needed, it'll have to go on the back too.

Oh, and the Unimog will (probably/hopefully) be an ex-army U1300L (got one to sell? &#129300

It's like a gigantic multidimensional Tetris game. Trying to figure one thing out at a time. My brain hurts a lot. 🤯 Any help is very much appreciated.

Also big thanks to everyone posting about their builds and 'Mogs. All the info is much appreciated. 😎👍🏻
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post #2 of 17 (permalink) Old 01-07-2019, 07:29 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheJoker View Post
I was wondering if you could help me figure out the dimensions of our (hopefully) to be Unimog Camper Box..... I've found some dimensions, and the most accurate ones are in the Atlas 4x4 product catalogue.

What do you think of these dimensions? What are your camper dimensions?

We're still in very early planning stages, but we're thinking of building the box ourselves, so we can have quite a lot of flexibility in the design (simpler is obviously better).

It's like a gigantic multidimensional Tetris game. Trying to figure one thing out at a time.
Once again, the Universal Answer comes to mind: It Depends.

The actual questions should be, and the one that I am working on answering for myself, is:

1) Where do I want to go? Meaning, how open vs. restricted are the routes and terrain? A Mog by itself is pretty nimble, albeit large, but the bigger the rear appendage, the more that width and height of the body start to restrict where you can go, what you can access. Now that I have an RW1, I can safely go to more extreme places that I didnít feel comfortable doing in my F250. BUT, I have already figured out that I have also cut myself off from some routes, particularly in the Colorado mountains. Why, you ask? Many of the old mining roads are below treeline, and are not maintained. The foliage has been scrapped away to the extent of Jeep clearance, and can get brutal, if not impassable, for something much wider and much, much taller. On my recent Utah trip, I barely made it through some tight cedar patches, then had to wipe the top corner of the firebody on an overhanging sandstone formation to get through and continue my route. If the Sahara is your destination (like in Atlas promo shots), size doesnít matter.

2) How comfortable do I want to be? A related question is, how important is weight and windage, for highway travel? Again, you must make your own decision and strike your own balance. One approach is to max out volume, but if size is critical, then you need to consider some sort of pop-up (which is where I am at in my own ruminations).

3) On a pragmatic note, do I envision an Atlas sub-frame, which lowers the camper about 3Ē, but does necessitate wheel well intrusions into the camper floor? For me, thatís a yes; the kit is on my shop floor now.

My own intent is to mess with the truck for at least another year (partly $ driven, so to speak), and then start by laying out more from the inside, rather than from a given shell. I suspect that I will be trying hard to minimize volume. One thing I am really starting to point towards is to limit overall width to that of the 365ís, no wider.

I presume you have gone through the required reading list?

Kreitpiel- camper (build thread)
Iain_Unimog (build thread)
IridiumMoon (dropped out of sight since he completed his camper)
Lostintheworld (the blog, not so much the questions posted)

And you have looked over the Bliss Mobil site? There is more than one way to skin a Mog.

Freedom of Independence | Bliss Mobil Expedition Vehicle: The Freedom of Independence

Bottom line, you do have a blank sheet. Just need a program, and that is more on you.
One other thought: I'd probably decide on the appliances, batteries, PV array etc, etc, that I thought I wanted, and start by seeing how I could arrange them in a theoretical volume.
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post #3 of 17 (permalink) Old 01-07-2019, 08:31 AM
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Here are the dimensions of the box that we designed/built for our U1300L.

-Exterior Dimensions: 137″ long, 86.5″ wide, 83″ tall
-Interior Dimensions: 82.5″ wide with 6’4″ standing head height
-Walls are 50mm thick composite sandwich panel.
-The ceiling, floor, forward, and and aft wall are 84mm thick composite sandwich panel
-Steel / composite hardpoints embedded in floor and back wall for mounting
-Habitat is mounted to a modified U1300L sub-frame

We are almost finished with our habitat build. It's just the two of us, and we like the size. I'm 6'2", and the hight is good for me. We are glad that we spent the extra time/effort and made a pass-through.

We post current build photos on our blog twice a week, so we have lots of other info that might be helpful to you in the decision stage.

Michael
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1996 M1078 LMTV (sold) (Our old LMTV blog)
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post #4 of 17 (permalink) Old 01-07-2019, 08:36 AM
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A few more photos of how small/large our 11.5 ft box is. For us, much smaller would have made the floor-plan too cramped, and I think much larger would have been too big for the truck.

Michael
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1987 U1300L Unimog Expedition Truck (Our Unimog blog)
1996 M1078 LMTV (sold) (Our old LMTV blog)
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post #5 of 17 (permalink) Old 01-07-2019, 03:58 PM
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FGS Composites is designing my camper. My criteria are: Set up for a couple; Comfortable, but not a replica of home; Off grid for short stints (1 week); Low when roof closed, comfortable for 6' person when open; Internal toilet and shower; Dinette; Fridge & kitchen box accessible from inside and out; robust enough to handle branches, scrub and gentle rubbing up against cliff faces. Not unattractive!

The most difficult decision so far is windows. Outbound products are good, but expensive. Anything double glazed and less than Outbound and the branches will win. Many of the windows have thermal bridging problems. Then comes electricals. Do I need an induction cooktop or aircon. If so it's lithium. If not it's a much simpler and cheaper AGM solution.

It's a work in progress, but I'm confident it will work out.

Box is 3650 x 2250 x 1680. (146" x 90" x 67.2") Subframe will be lowered with 100mm (4") wheel arches as they are on my Binz box.
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post #6 of 17 (permalink) Old 01-08-2019, 02:15 AM Thread Starter
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Cool

Hi, thanks for your extensive reply. I'll reply to each point individually.

Quote:
Originally Posted by photobldr View Post
Once again, the Universal Answer comes to mind: It Depends.
Of course...

Quote:
Originally Posted by photobldr View Post
The actual questions should be, and the one that I am working on answering for myself, is:

1) Where do I want to go? Meaning, how open vs. restricted are the routes and terrain? A Mog by itself is pretty nimble, albeit large, but the bigger the rear appendage, the more that width and height of the body start to restrict where you can go, what you can access. Now that I have an RW1, I can safely go to more extreme places that I didnít feel comfortable doing in my F250. BUT, I have already figured out that I have also cut myself off from some routes, particularly in the Colorado mountains. Why, you ask? Many of the old mining roads are below treeline, and are not maintained. The foliage has been scrapped away to the extent of Jeep clearance, and can get brutal, if not impassable, for something much wider and much, much taller. On my recent Utah trip, I barely made it through some tight cedar patches, then had to wipe the top corner of the firebody on an overhanging sandstone formation to get through and continue my route. If the Sahara is your destination (like in Atlas promo shots), size doesnít matter.
Yes, I totally agree. This is sort of why I'm more interested in hearing what people say about their dimensions and what they've experienced. I.e comments on the lines of "Our is XYZ high, but it's restricting us a lot" or "We made ours a bit wider at ABC, and we regret it".

The ideal camper is like the ideal ladies shoe; comfortable and roomy on the inside, but sleek and stylish on the outside. Maybe in camper terms, it's small and nimble, but you get the point.

Our initial plan is Europe, if we venture further it should still work. However, I would definitely like to go up the mountains and admire the views and make it down to the secluded lakes and coves to relax.


Quote:
Originally Posted by photobldr View Post
2) How comfortable do I want to be? A related question is, how important is weight and windage, for highway travel? Again, you must make your own decision and strike your own balance. One approach is to max out volume, but if size is critical, then you need to consider some sort of pop-up (which is where I am at in my own ruminations).
Yes, we're quite settled on what we need. How to make the Tetris pieces fit, is another level of the game.
We've sort of narrowed it down to being comfortable, but we do not expect "luxury indoor living". We'd like to be outdoors as much as possible, but we're very aware of that bad weather or work might see us spending a lot of time inside. Therefore we'll need at least to places to set up "office" (laptop, papers, external disks, etc), and we're probably going to require an arrangement where one can sleep and the other one can be working on the laptop. So no bed that lowers down over the "office" is possible. The work situation will probably require a lot of electricity, so we're also currently dealing with trying to figure out that puzzle. On the back of that, we'll also probably go for induction cooker as the addition shouldn't be that much (famous last words?). We'll also need toilet and shower.
Trying to avoid any complications like pop-tops and such.

Quote:
Originally Posted by photobldr View Post
3) On a pragmatic note, do I envision an Atlas sub-frame, which lowers the camper about 3Ē, but does necessitate wheel well intrusions into the camper floor? For me, thatís a yes; the kit is on my shop floor now.
I'm getting more and more aware of this. That extra 3" / 7.5cm (or 10cm) would be very useable.

Quote:
Originally Posted by photobldr View Post
My own intent is to mess with the truck for at least another year (partly $ driven, so to speak), and then start by laying out more from the inside, rather than from a given shell. I suspect that I will be trying hard to minimize volume. One thing I am really starting to point towards is to limit overall width to that of the 365ís, no wider.
Sounds like a sound plan. And by 365's you mean tyres? Or?

Quote:
Originally Posted by photobldr View Post
I presume you have gone through the required reading list?

Kreitpiel- camper (build thread)
Iain_Unimog (build thread)
IridiumMoon (dropped out of sight since he completed his camper)
Lostintheworld (the blog, not so much the questions posted)
Yes, met IridiumMoon at the Stratford-upon-Avon Adventure Overland show, and had a poke around in his high-quality build. I've even emailed him a few times to ask about his box material. Very helpful, much appreciated.
Wading through Iain_Unimog's excellent build thread at the moment too. So much to absorb.
I think I've missed Krietpiel's thread, much go hit the search button, thanks!
And Lostintheworld, I'm trying to keep up with Wabi-sabi, but he's posting so much! Thanks!

Quote:
Originally Posted by photobldr View Post
And you have looked over the Bliss Mobil site? There is more than one way to skin a Mog.

Freedom of Independence | Bliss Mobil Expedition Vehicle: The Freedom of Independence
I've seen/heard of them before, but thanks for the link. They've got some dimensions there that I've now added to the spreadsheet.

Quote:
Originally Posted by photobldr View Post
Bottom line, you do have a blank sheet. Just need a program, and that is more on you.
One other thought: I'd probably decide on the appliances, batteries, PV array etc, etc, that I thought I wanted, and start by seeing how I could arrange them in a theoretical volume.
Yes, blank sheet, limited budget, time... don't know. Good point re applicances. I'm hoping to be "blocking" them into a 3D modelling software to get an idea of how to fit the pieces.

Thanks for your reply! Much appreciated!

On to answer the next ones...
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post #7 of 17 (permalink) Old 01-08-2019, 02:20 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks for that info!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lostintheworld View Post
Here are the dimensions of the box that we designed/built for our U1300L.

-Exterior Dimensions: 137″ long, 86.5″ wide, 83″ tall
-Interior Dimensions: 82.5″ wide with 6í4″ standing head height
-Walls are 50mm thick composite sandwich panel.
-The ceiling, floor, forward, and and aft wall are 84mm thick composite sandwich panel
-Steel / composite hardpoints embedded in floor and back wall for mounting
-Habitat is mounted to a modified U1300L sub-frame

We are almost finished with our habitat build. It's just the two of us, and we like the size. I'm 6'2", and the hight is good for me. We are glad that we spent the extra time/effort and made a pass-through.
I've been (trying to) follow your build blog. There's just so much information there that I'm struggling to keep up (nice problem to have!). I like your interior layout. Do you have any comments on it? Something good/bad/etc? Don't do this, must do that? I'm, in my head, trying to maximise the normally unused spaces, such as hallways, toilet/shower, etc. It's not easy to figure things like this out.

Are you happy with the subframe? I'm asking because I'd like to be cheap, but I'd also like the extra height that a lower subframe might afford. Both worlds.

Thanks for the dimensions, they're now in the spreadsheet.
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post #8 of 17 (permalink) Old 01-08-2019, 02:25 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks CragDuc! Much appreciated!

Quote:
Originally Posted by CragDuc View Post
FGS Composites is designing my camper. My criteria are: Set up for a couple; Comfortable, but not a replica of home; Off grid for short stints (1 week); Low when roof closed, comfortable for 6' person when open; Internal toilet and shower; Dinette; Fridge & kitchen box accessible from inside and out; robust enough to handle branches, scrub and gentle rubbing up against cliff faces. Not unattractive!

The most difficult decision so far is windows. Outbound products are good, but expensive. Anything double glazed and less than Outbound and the branches will win. Many of the windows have thermal bridging problems. Then comes electricals. Do I need an induction cooktop or aircon. If so it's lithium. If not it's a much simpler and cheaper AGM solution.

It's a work in progress, but I'm confident it will work out.

Box is 3650 x 2250 x 1680. (146" x 90" x 67.2") Subframe will be lowered with 100mm (4") wheel arches as they are on my Binz box.
Very interesting box you have there. I'm trying to avoid pop-tops, etc as I'm currently thinking of building the box myself, so any complications would make it exponentially more difficult. I'm also hoping to make it habitable in the winter, so any canvas walls would have to be severely insulated. Sadly our box will be a lot taller than a pop-top box. Can't have it all.
How are you lowering the subframe? I'd love to know. Might save me some budget money for diesel/beer.

Thanks for the dimensions and your reply, info is in the spreadsheet.
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post #9 of 17 (permalink) Old 01-08-2019, 10:30 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheJoker View Post
Thanks for that info!

I've been (trying to) follow your build blog. There's just so much information there that I'm struggling to keep up (nice problem to have!). I like your interior layout. Do you have any comments on it? Something good/bad/etc? Don't do this, must do that? I'm, in my head, trying to maximise the normally unused spaces, such as hallways, toilet/shower, etc. It's not easy to figure things like this out.

Are you happy with the subframe? I'm asking because I'd like to be cheap, but I'd also like the extra height that a lower subframe might afford. Both worlds.

Thanks for the dimensions, they're now in the spreadsheet.
There are pluses and minuses to every choice. Sometimes you just need to pick what you like and live with any shortcomings.

Overall, we are quite happy with our layout. We tried to use as much of the volume in multiple ways as we could. Our entry area is the shower for example. It's nice because it is a double use of space, but also we can wash off muddy boots and such in the shower on our way in. It is also nice because it put the toilet in a dry area (we are debating if we will put a door on the toilet area).

We wanted a full time dinette, so we tried to make it a good eating area and also usable as an office space. We also wanted a full time bed, so we picked a nice thick mattress and set the cabinets and ceiling height over the bed, so you can sit with a laptop and use the bed as a reading and working area. Basically, we tried to have double use of each area if we could.

I like our modified stock sub-frame. I like how simple, light, and inexpensive it is. I like that it is what MB intended to go on the truck. I like that it has a lot of clearance with everything under the habitat. I also like that we were able to go with a continuous flat floor without wheel and suspension cutouts. The obvious downside is that our box is 3" higher.

I looked at a U1300L expedition truck a few weeks ago that had the low profile sub-frame, it had a lot less clearance everywhere underneath. My understanding is that with those sub-frames, you need to be really careful and do a lot of torsion test to make sure you aren't going to clash and load up something when the frame twists.

As a general note about size. It's amazing how much a few inches makes. If our box was 6 inches longer, it would seem way different inside, and it would look way different on the outside. Your eye is really good at picking up small differences in size. I was in a expo truck recently that was about 20" longer than ours. It looked huge inside. It also looked huge on the outside.

Michael
__________________________________________________

My photography blog
My photography Instagram
Our U1300L Unimog Expedition Truck blog
Our U1300L Unimog Expedition Truck Instagram
1996 M1078 LMTV (sold) (Our old LMTV blog)
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post #10 of 17 (permalink) Old 01-08-2019, 10:56 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheJoker View Post

I'm, in my head, trying to maximise the normally unused spaces, such as hallways, toilet/shower, etc. It's not easy to figure things like this out.
Have you checked out the Earthcruiser site? No, not to get off you Mogs, but because they have some really smart and innovative stuff in their exp body design. One is the shower as the entry, but they also have the toilet that slides out into this spot, from under a cabinet. No separate toilet area needed.

https://earthcruiser.com/our-vehicles/earthcruiser-fx/

Misc, sans relevant quotes:

The Atlas subframe is pricey, unless you have to put a $ value on an alternative. My general take on things is that if someone has solved a problem reasonably well, and is producing it, you cannot compete with their price point doing a one-off. (also, they are the lightest sub-frame you will be able to come up with)

Thought: There are two ways to base buying decisions: price or cost.

Yes, 365's are the tires, more to the point, overall track width. On the subject of width, if it seems a big concern, there is a case to be made for tapering the width narrower, above say the mid-height of the box. Has to do with effective width when on a side-slope. Lot more work for the builder, though.
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