Servicing the Rear Wheel Bearings - Mercedes-Benz Forum
 
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post #1 of 10 (permalink) Old 04-27-2019, 05:03 PM Thread Starter
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Servicing the Rear Wheel Bearings

A while back I did a write up about servicing the front wheel bearings on our 107's. That was pretty much a standard wheel bearing service procedure that anyone who took a high school shop class (remember when they had those) would be familiar with, with the exceptions of the few twist added for Mercedes. That thread is available here:

https://www.benzworld.org/forums/r-c...-bearings.html

Today I'm working on the rear wheel bearings, which are completely different. These are a cross between a standard front wheel bearing and a differential pinion bearing of the 1980's vintage. In fact this week is the first time I ever did this job, (which is not done yet)

To start with you will need to remove the rear wheel, caliper and rotor.

For the 560SL I had to completely remove the axle. According to the manual you don't have to remove the axle you can just remove the center bolt at the hub and push it all the way in, disengage it from the hub and wire it up out of the way. The manual was written for the earlier 107's so hopefully that is true, other wise that would really suck.

So in any case with wheels calipers rotors and axles out of the way we begin. We are now ready to remove the hub flange. Of course this will require a Mercedes special tool. Fortunately Sunex makes one tool number 10203, and it is available from various sources for under $20.00. It does look kind of fragile but I was able to use an impact wrench on it, not that you should have to but if you need to it worked for me. See the first pic.

You will need to react the load on the hub when removing the nut. This can be done with another MB special tool that cost about $500 or you can use two lug nuts and a pry bar like I did, see pic #2.

The nut in question is the slotted nut shown in pic #3. The special tool pilots into the center spline area and the tangs engage the nut. Make sure the slots in the nut are cleaned out good so that the tool engages all the way down. Also notice the nut has deform-able tangs that need to be bent clear of the threads before proceeding. Those can be bent out of the way with a drift punch and hammer. So with the nut clean and tabs bent out of the way, react the load as shown in picture 2 and remove the nut. It should come off without an impact gun, but if you need one use it very carefully.

More to come
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post #2 of 10 (permalink) Old 04-27-2019, 06:21 PM Thread Starter
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With the nut removed, removing the hub axle can be done with a slide hammer type puller. A setup like the one shown is available for about $100. But if your stuck 2 or 3 12" long 12mm x 1 threaded rods and nuts can be use with a wheel turned backwards to make a crude slide hammer.

The second picture shows all the parts involved. All of these parts will be discarded with the exception of the flange hub itself. The replacement parts for the 560SL are kit A123-350-00-68. I believe that kit number is the same for all 107s but do check. When you pull out the hub you will have a bare hub with the inner tapered roller bearing pressed onto it. The rest of these parts with the exception of the slot nut are still in the car.

The next three items to remove are the seal ring, the outer seal and the outer bearing. These can all be just slipped out with the exception of the inner seal which needs to be pried out.

The outer seal can be removed by poking a drift through the back side and driving it out.

OK so you are now left with two pressed in races and a bearing pressed onto the hub flange shaft.


Correction to second pic the seal and bearing on top are the inner seal and bearing.
Next chapter. coming
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Last edited by roncallo; 04-28-2019 at 01:35 PM. Reason: added correction.
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post #3 of 10 (permalink) Old 04-27-2019, 08:04 PM Thread Starter
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A tail of two bearing race driver sets. When I was doing my differential I needed bearing race drivers. So I ordered 1 set on Amazon for about $30. There are several of these kits all with the same size drivers but various cases. It is the kit pictured in the red box. It had some sizes but not the larger ones. So I had to get another kit with some of the larger drivers. That is the kit shown in the grey box costing about $80 at the time. Both kits have there uses and I also found that there really is no overlap in sizes. Bottom line to service all tapered roller bearings on the 107 you need them both. The smaller set is generally a front wheel bearing set.

So in any case we need to drive the races out of the trailing arms. The inner race is fairly easy. Find something round ~ 2.4" in diameter and drive it out. I used the back side of one of my bearing drivers from the smaller set. It really was too small and got a bit scared but it got the bearing race out and it will be OK. For the outer bearing, driving it out from the inside wont work using a dowel type tool because the tool needs to pass through the smaller diameter inner race land.

You can probably drive the outer race out with a punch being very careful not to scare the bore with the punch. I have done that many times on front wheel bearing hubs and have also scared many bores so I try to avoid it. I'm sure MB has a special tool for under $500 but I made my own. It consists of a plate I attach to my slide hammer. The plate is narrowed at the sides to it can be cocked inserted and then brought into position behind the bearing race and then the slide hammer can be used to pull it out. While I do have a lathe and can make these things, I have made many cruder versions of these with some flat stock a drill and a bench grinder.

The last thing to pull off is the tapered roller bearing on the hub flange axle. That will require a shop press and bearing splitter or any destructive method to get it off as long as you don't hurt the hub flange shaft.

More to come
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post #4 of 10 (permalink) Old 04-28-2019, 10:17 AM Thread Starter
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At this point I am down waiting for parts. So while I'm down I will show you what I at least plan to do for installation.

Installation will proceed as follows:

First - Press in two races.

Second - Install the outer and inner seals.

Third - Press on the outer tapered roller bearing.

Forth- Install the hub axle flange assembly, install the crush color and press on the inner tapered roller bearing.

All of which require MB special tools to install. All of which I plan to make tools for and improvise.

Pressing in the races - Straight forward enough. Using the larger race installation set I presented earlier (Lisle Tool # 59400), which has the perfect fit mandrels for both the inner and outer race. While the outer race is straight forward just tap it in with the tool as is, the inner race may present some challenges to hitting the race driver squarely with a hammer. So what I plan on doing is installing both races simultaneously by pulling them together with a threaded rod. The first picture show's the puller arrangement requiring two mandrels from the Lisle Tool # 59400 and a 1/2" threaded rod and two nuts. The second picture shows the system installed ready to pull in both bearings.

Seals - Same procedure as above except I will use larger race installation mandrels turned over.

Outer bearing installation. I will be using a press but this can be easily accomplished with a 4" piece of 2" OD 0.083" wall tubing, a block of wood and a hammer. Doesn't appear to be a water pipe size close enough to be used possibly something in PVC or Copper?. In any case 2" x 083 wall DOM tube is available at most steel suppliers. Speedy metals.com sells this for under $1.00 per inch plus about $20.00 shipping and profit. Mcmaster Carr also has tube this size but only by the ft and in more expensive 4140 but with reasonable shipping charges.

Now comes the inner bearing. First make sure both seals are installed. Place the crush collar onto the hub axle shaft and install the hub into the control arm. Install the inner bearing from the back side and install the MB special tool shown in the 4th picture or make up a tool like I made in the 5th picture, consisting of a 10" threaded rod, a short piece of 1-1/2" water pipe weld to a washer (Welding is optional but if you do it please remove all galvanize of you will die). The pipe can just be a short nipple from HD or I tried a 1 1/2" socket which was the biggest one I have, it was just too small so if you have something bigger it may work. I also think the 1 1/2" socket would have worked if it was 12 pt instead of 6pt.

When I look at the MB tool I feel that It is well over designed with duplex bearings and such and probably cost billions. Or maybe I'm in for a rude awakening. The one area that you need to be careful with when using the home made tool is that you will have to visually pilot the tube onto the bearing. Not paying attention here could damage the threads of the shaft.

In any case I will not have my parts until Wednesday and probably be unable to post an update until the following week. At that time I will go through crushing the crush collar and setting the final play.
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post #5 of 10 (permalink) Old 04-28-2019, 11:58 AM Thread Starter
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One last detail I cam across in the manual.

The hub flanges are left and right and differ by the direction of the oil control spiral which only covers about 25mm of the sealing area.

Pictures 1 and 2 are from the manual.

Pictures 3 are my car where I have identified the oil spiral, yes it does exist. Picture 4 is of the spiral area after using emery at 20 as stated. Since my seal was obviously leaking, I figured I would check this out. Picture 5 shoes the "R" I found on the flange.
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post #6 of 10 (permalink) Old 04-30-2019, 12:13 PM
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When I did mine last year I could not find any sign of the spiral, I'm not sure if it had worn off or was never present.

Are you also going to replace the anti squat bearings?


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post #7 of 10 (permalink) Old 04-30-2019, 03:05 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by RaceDiagnostics View Post
When I did mine last year I could not find any sign of the spiral, I'm not sure if it had worn off or was never present.

Are you also going to replace the anti squat bearings?
I have another one that came out of the junk yard in really rough shape, (The one in post #4) I cleaned it off and could not find either the spiral or the Letter "R" or "L".

The entire rear subframe will come out for complete overhaul when the car goes out for paint.
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post #8 of 10 (permalink) Old 05-01-2019, 01:15 AM
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When I did mine MB wanted over 500 for each of these, they have now dropped that price, however they are standard bearings. It turned out to be a double race 80x100x15, typical part number 3816-B-2RS-TVH.



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post #9 of 10 (permalink) Old 05-12-2019, 01:48 PM Thread Starter
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OK I'm back from Atlanta and caught up with chores. So where was I. Oh yeah I go the bearings in and installed them as planned. Of course nothing ever goes according to plan.

I thought I installed the bearing races correctly but when I went to install the hub shaft all bearing play had disappeared prior to crushing the collar. That's not supposed to happen so out it came for investigation. I took it out, measured the crush collar and found that it in fact did not crush. The only way that can happen is if the bearings did not fully seat. And it turned out that the outer bearing was not fully seated. So I had to figure out why and how to seat it.

I took it apart and tried to drive it in some more I found what happened. Although it felt seated when I removed the mandrel there was evidence of interference as the outer diameter was larger than the bearing race bore. I checked the Inner bearing as well and found that one to be OK in that the mandrel OD was smaller than the bearing race. So I used the old bearing race to drive it the rest of the way home.

Unfortunately I had to remove the outer seal to re-seat the outer race and that required prying the seal out.

I thought I was going to be down and unable to drive to Atlanta but the seal cam out with only superficial damage, so I just put it back in.

OK now back to installation of the axle hub. It turns out that the crush collar requires a lot of torque to crush. So much so that the method I used to react the torque bent a full set of 5 NLA lug bolts that I had. I will definitely be making a more appropriate tool to react this torque.

So now with the Bearing seated correctly and the possibility of a damaged seal I was ready to put the wheel on and call it a night. Wrong.

I go to put the wheel back on and notice the same play I noticed when I first decided to change the wheel bearings. This was the same play I could only observe with the wheel installed.

It turn's out that I had replaced a rear wheel bearing for nothing as it was not the wheel bearing at all. So for no reason at all I just spent $130 for a wheel bearing kit, possibly damaged a seal putting it in and destroyed 5 NLA lug bolts. Yes that is the sad reality.

About grease. The FAG bearing kit comes with that little packet of grease shown in the first picture. I don't know what that is for because MB states to put 50 gms of grease in each bearing and fill the cavity in between the races. I used MB wheel bearing grease A002 989 00 51 10 which comes in a 150 gm tube. I used almost all of it.

So what was it. More to come.
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Last edited by roncallo; 05-12-2019 at 01:53 PM.
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post #10 of 10 (permalink) Old 05-12-2019, 02:17 PM Thread Starter
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OK so what happened? Some of you may recall a thread I started last year where I was trying to figure out how to take apart the rear control arms.

In any case I abandoned that task for the moment until I could get a complete rear end assembly and rebuild it. I still need a few pieces for that. But in the mean time I tried to put it back together not thinking I wouldn't get to this for another year. Un-fortunately I never had it fully apart but I did remove nut #17 in the picture in the first post of the attached thread. That nut cannot be tightened properly without further disassembly so I did the best I could knowing it would be somewhat temporary but all those rubber joints and frozen bearing make it pretty hard to tell when your seated. It turns out with the tire installed you can do a pretty good job of it.

But it looks like the thread below is about to be brought back to life.

https://www.benzworld.org/forums/r-c...l-carrier.html
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