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  Topic Review (Newest First)
06-18-2019 09:35 PM
Kajtek1 I had. The 1998 E300DT was the car I kept for personal use the longest ever.
We had ML for 13 years, but our son was driving it in last few years.
The 8 years I drove E300DT took only new fuel tubings, new water pump and transmission plate + radiator what I blame PO for.
One of the cheapest cars to drive in the World.
06-18-2019 10:32 AM
tjts1
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kajtek1 View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by tjts1 View Post
I added electric pumps to both my 87 and 97 diesels just below the fuel tank. It makes changing fuel filter very easy. Just swap in the filter completely dry and run the electric pump for a few sec. Engine starts right up first crank.
You will have the same effect after topping off your fuel tank, or tilting the car.
I did it twice, once pushing the car down the sloping driveway, other time helping other member, after replacing all fuel lines and filter, we topped of the tank, (up to fill neck) and the engine fired in couple of seconds.

Why complicate such a good system? That is like creating potential troubles where they don't exist.
LOL yeah good luck with all that.
06-18-2019 09:55 AM
Kajtek1
Quote:
Originally Posted by tjts1 View Post
I added electric pumps to both my 87 and 97 diesels just below the fuel tank. It makes changing fuel filter very easy. Just swap in the filter completely dry and run the electric pump for a few sec. Engine starts right up first crank.
You will have the same effect after topping off your fuel tank, or tilting the car.
I did it twice, once pushing the car down the sloping driveway, other time helping other member, after replacing all fuel lines and filter, we topped of the tank, (up to fill neck) and the engine fired in couple of seconds.
Why complicate such a good system? That is like creating potential troubles where they don't exist.
06-18-2019 06:14 AM
tjts1 Delphi fd0040, 8psi, $35 4 years ago. Not sure about the draw. If you dig through delphi's site they had a specific sheet for it but I can't seem to find it at the moment.


When I got the om606 5 years ago I was battling the typical bubbles in the fuel system with hard starts especially when parked on my steep driveway. I replaced every O ring and fuel line under the hood to no avail. With the electric fuel pump that's become a non issue. The fuel pump starts the GPs at key position 2 and the engine fires up instantly every time.
06-18-2019 01:24 AM
Deplore Any info on the pump? How much pressure/power draw? Cost?

Curious....
06-17-2019 11:06 PM
tjts1 I added electric pumps to both my 87 and 97 diesels just below the fuel tank. It makes changing fuel filter very easy. Just swap in the filter completely dry and run the electric pump for a few sec. Engine starts right up first crank. On the 87 turbo diesel the pump is on a 3 position switch. ON, OFF or AUTO. In auto the pump activates any time boost pressure exceeds 3 psi. It makes a noticeable difference in power. On the 97 non turbo it's just ON or OFF. Mostly use it for cold starts or starting on a steep hill with low fuel where the column of fuel has to be pulled up hill.

These cars should've had an electric pump under the fuel tank from the factory.

Pump on my 87 mounter under the rear seat. It's a Delphi something or other diesel pump.
06-17-2019 05:55 PM
boyd waugh I've got one of these on the return line just under the inlet manifold.
Good for priming, with ignition on of course.

https://www.amazon.com/Hand-Fuel-Pum.../dp/B01LXOJR4Z
06-15-2019 04:30 PM
Kajtek1 You already have priming pump about a foot from firewall.
That on the system, where tank center line is above injection pump, what makes the system mostly -self priming.
Bottom line- when need for such a pump is very questionable - it will bring additional headaches.
06-15-2019 03:30 PM
BenzHacker The type of electric pump I'm describing don't do a very good job of pulling the fuel column, they are best at pushing it along. This is why you generally see them below a fuel tank where the inlet is practically gravity fed due to the low suction they produce. By comparison, the mechanical lift pump is exceptionally good at pulling fuel, but only so so at pushing it along. It is for this reason that if I mount a auxiliary fuel pump, it's going to have to be under the tank. I haven't picked a fuse position for a switched 12V supply, but there are several unused circuits to choose from. Running a wire conduit won't be difficult and the getting a ground is a matter of scuffing off some paint with a die grinder and applying a thin film of dielectric grease to the new ground point (no need to run another wire back to the engine bay).

The only downside I can think of for the installation of the pump is that most manufacturers want a pre-filter inline in front of the pump to protect its impellers from crud. That adds to the length of the installation to avoid creating a C curve or an S curve in the fuel hose between the tank and the pump which really should be done with hardline instead of resilient hose to prevent hose kinks and folds.

-bh
06-15-2019 12:09 AM
Deplore Instead of messing around with the fuel line and adding an inline pump at the fuel line at the tank.....why not do it at the fuel inlet right by the firewall?

There's even a convenient 12v and ground right there.

I've been mulling the thought for a while. Maybe a very weak pump, 1-2 psi max, keyed to a spare fuse connector that turns on with ignition in pos 2, and it always feed the pump. Just didn't have the time -- or the temperament to start hunting for such pumps. Most cheap pumps are for coolant and other whatnot, and not exactly designed to handle diesel or gasoline, and those that are, usually supply pressure beyond what I want.
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