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Topic: Advice on changing single row chain? Reply to Thread
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  Topic Review (Newest First)
04-18-2019 08:38 AM
Walt Williams
Quote:
Originally Posted by frazierfrazier View Post
Been hearing the death rattle last few startups and my chain is indeed loose . . . .
Iv'e only heard it once. Right after changing my timing chain I ran Wally-World 5W 15 motor-oil and a quart of Marvel Mystery Oil as an oil system flush. I only ran it gently for 250 miles strictly around town. When I drained it and it came out BLACK and with some globs. When I refilled with 20W50 and started it the engine made a rattling sound that scared the hell out of me. It promptly quit once the oil pressure came up. I haven't heard it since.
04-17-2019 11:52 PM
Ruindr Congratulations on a job well done!
04-17-2019 09:27 PM
frazierfrazier
Quote:
Originally Posted by okyoureabeast View Post
Sadly you'll be seeing that bastard again in 25k miles.
Well, you bet your ass I wonít be doing the guides and tensioner after 25k! Feeding the chain was a breeze, and if I manage to find single row master links with circlips (I think I have), then that will make it that much easier. I personally didnít find it necessary to remove the spark plugs, but I did use a breaker bar and I had a friend hold the old chain just for peace of mind... and to bring the beer.
04-17-2019 07:31 PM
okyoureabeast
Quote:
Originally Posted by isthisdave View Post
.



Yeah, you're fighting compression kick back and the cams' spring tensions and your tensioner has no hydraulic pressure. Carry on.

Probably some engineer thought, "Hey we can save a few cents" because the compression was lower. I read somewhere about an automotive engineer who said that by saving a few cents on a design they get bonuses.


Quote:
Originally Posted by frazierfrazier View Post
Well, the job was a success! Started right up and idles wonderfully. Canít drive it yet because I cross threaded a very expensive power steering hose that I will need to either use a thread chaser on or replace... oh well!

The most frustrating part was the INFERNAL rivet style master link. Why Iwis doesnít have a single row circlip style master link is downright stupid. I ended up pressing it together with large vice grips until the pins bottomed out on one side when connecting the new chain to the old chain. I used a flathead screwdriver to pry the link off. When connecting the new chain to itself, I ended up using a very heavy hammer as an anvil, and a large ballpeen hammer to make the river. Worked great, but if you do this be careful. My cam gears are not cast, but some are (I believe) and you could break them.

Other than that, it was about what I expected. Nothing too crazy and canít imagine it differs too much from the regular olí double row.
Dang congrats bud.

Guess you can say you're apart of the "chain gang" now

Sadly you'll be seeing that bastard again in 25k miles.
04-17-2019 07:10 PM
frazierfrazier Well, the job was a success! Started right up and idles wonderfully. Canít drive it yet because I cross threaded a very expensive power steering hose that I will need to either use a thread chaser on or replace... oh well!

The most frustrating part was the INFERNAL rivet style master link. Why Iwis doesnít have a single row circlip style master link is downright stupid. I ended up pressing it together with large vice grips until the pins bottomed out on one side when connecting the new chain to the old chain. I used a flathead screwdriver to pry the link off. When connecting the new chain to itself, I ended up using a very heavy hammer as an anvil, and a large ballpeen hammer to make the river. Worked great, but if you do this be careful. My cam gears are not cast, but some are (I believe) and you could break them.

Other than that, it was about what I expected. Nothing too crazy and canít imagine it differs too much from the regular olí double row.
04-16-2019 07:04 PM
Jyuma
Quote:
Originally Posted by frazierfrazier View Post
Thanks Jyuma, that does make sense. And yes, clockwise by hand is how Iíve been doing it.

Iím aware that by leaving the rocker arms on while feeding the new chain I will experience that spring tension in a more ďdramaticĒ way. Will leaving the spark plugs in (compression) lessen this effect?

Also, in addition to using the cable ties on the new chain, I plan to have a friend hold the old chain and keep some tension on it. Is this necessary? My fear was that by leaving the old chain slack, I could skip a tooth at the crank.

I noticed in Panzerpuffís video, he would feed the chain in and let the old one fall to the floor, but it did seem to be bunching up inside the engine SOMEWHERE... spooky.
Will leaving the spark plugs in (compression) lessen this effect? Not really, but it will make it easier to turn.

I don't think you have to worry that leaving the chain slack could skip a tooth at the crank. I believe the chain guides down there will prevent that, hopefully someone else will verify that, but I don't think Panzerpuff would have allowed the old chain to just hang if there was a chance of it skipping a tooth at the crank.
04-16-2019 06:13 PM
frazierfrazier Thanks Jyuma, that does make sense. And yes, clockwise by hand is how I’ve been doing it.

I’m aware that by leaving the rocker arms on while feeding the new chain I will experience that spring tension in a more “dramatic” way. Will leaving the spark plugs in (compression) lessen this effect?

Also, in addition to using the cable ties on the new chain, I plan to have a friend hold the old chain and keep some tension on it. Is this necessary? My fear was that by leaving the old chain slack, I could skip a tooth at the crank.

I noticed in Panzerpuff’s video, he would feed the chain in and let the old one fall to the floor, but it did seem to be bunching up inside the engine SOMEWHERE... spooky.
04-16-2019 05:16 PM
Jyuma
Quote:
Originally Posted by frazierfrazier View Post
Can someone tell me if this is normal? When I turn the engine over by hand, the length of chain that runs between the top side of the two cams and through the guide wheel gets slack, then when I give it another turns, everything is tight again. The length of chain that runs across the distributor and crankshaft sprockets stays pretty taught, with very slight play on some rotations. Timing marks are all pretty spot on.

Did the guides and tensioner today. Getting those cam sprockets off was damn near impossible... but I persevered, lol. Chain tomorrow provided the chain riveting tool comes in!
I assume you are only turning the engine clockwise by hand... if so then the tension on the chain between the two cam sprockets may at times appear to become slack if one or more of the valves on the passenger side are past the full open position. In that case the springs on the individual cam lobes will be exerting force on the cam to continue to rotate and without the chain tensioner taking up the slack the chain between the two cam sprockets may appear to go slightly slack.

You can expect to observe this in a far more dramatic manner when you are feeding the new chain and the other end of the old chain is no longer attached. The new chain may actually snap forward as the valve spring pushes the cam clockwise and there is no chain behind to stop it. Just make sure you keep at least two tie wraps clamping the new chain tightly to the cam sprocket when you are rotating the crank. You don't want the new chain to skip a link by accident.

Good luck.
04-16-2019 05:09 PM
isthisdave .



Yeah, you're fighting compression kick back and the cams' spring tensions and your tensioner has no hydraulic pressure. Carry on.
04-16-2019 02:23 PM
frazierfrazier Can someone tell me if this is normal? When I turn the engine over by hand, the length of chain that runs between the top side of the two cams and through the guide wheel gets slack, then when I give it another turns, everything is tight again. The length of chain that runs across the distributor and crankshaft sprockets stays pretty taught, with very slight play on some rotations. Timing marks are all pretty spot on.

Did the guides and tensioner today. Getting those cam sprockets off was damn near impossible... but I persevered, lol. Chain tomorrow provided the chain riveting tool comes in!
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