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  Topic Review (Newest First)
06-23-2019 12:02 PM
cowboyt Note that the article is from the year 2000, so it's 19 years ago. I wouldn't be surprised if it still applies, though; you want your thugs to just "follow orders" and not question them due to, oh, this little thing call the Constitution.

Quote:
Jordan, a 49-year-old college graduate, took the exam in 1996 and scored 33 points, the equivalent of an IQ of 125. But New London police interviewed only candidates who scored 20 to 27, on the theory that those who scored too high could get bored with police work and leave soon after undergoing costly training.

Most Cops Just Above Normal The average score nationally for police officers is 21 to 22, the equivalent of an IQ of 104, or just a little above average.

Jordan alleged his rejection from the police force was discrimination. He sued the city, saying his civil rights were violated because he was denied equal protection under the law.

But the U.S. District Court found that New London had “shown a rational basis for the policy.” In a ruling dated Aug. 23, the 2nd Circuit agreed. The court said the policy might be unwise but was a rational way to reduce job turnover.
Let's see here...let's replace "intelligent" with, say, "Black" and see how this goes.

Jordan, a 49-year-old college graduate, took the "paper-bag" test in 1996 and scored 33 points, the equivalent of a shade darker than a typical paper bag. But New London police interviewed only candidates who scored 20 to 27, on the theory that those who scored too high could get discouraged with police work and leave soon after undergoing costly training.

Most Cops Just Above Normal The average score nationally for police officers is 21 to 22, the equivalent of a skin tone of a peach, or just a little above average.

Jordan alleged his rejection from the police force was discrimination. He sued the city, saying his civil rights were violated because he was denied equal protection under the law.

But the U.S. District Court found that New London had “shown a rational basis for the policy.” In a ruling dated Aug. 23, the 2nd Circuit agreed. The court said the policy might be unwise but was a rational way to reduce job turnover.


Makes just about as much sense to me as the actual article. Reject a candidate for being intelligent? Really? Whoever's on that bench also apparently isn't very smart.
06-23-2019 07:50 AM
DEVOURS I thought that most who make a career of being on the force would want to move up through the ranks with experience and time. Intelligence should play a major roll if you're managing a department with 100's below you.

You'd expect and think that they would want the smartest and most qualified to take a higher ranking position.

Those testing "standards" tells us like it is..and possibly why we see and hear all of this shit on a near daily basis..
06-23-2019 04:32 AM
GreenT Can we agree that the qualifications to become a cop are way too lax? When just about every racist, dumbed down, inbred, psychopaths, who are basically borderline sociopaths and the detritus of society can get a badge and a gun... we have failed.


Quote:
A man whose bid to become a police officer was rejected after he scored too high on an intelligence test has lost an appeal in his federal lawsuit against the city.

The 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in New York upheld a lower court’s decision that the city did not discriminate against Robert Jordan because the same standards were applied to everyone who took the test.

“This kind of puts an official face on discrimination in America against people of a certain class,” Jordan said today from his Waterford home. “I maintain you have no more control over your basic intelligence than your eye color or your gender or anything else.”

He said he does not plan to take any further legal action.

Jordan, a 49-year-old college graduate, took the exam in 1996 and scored 33 points, the equivalent of an IQ of 125. But New London police interviewed only candidates who scored 20 to 27, on the theory that those who scored too high could get bored with police work and leave soon after undergoing costly training.

Most Cops Just Above Normal The average score nationally for police officers is 21 to 22, the equivalent of an IQ of 104, or just a little above average.

Obviously being a cop is a huge responsibility and you need serious training and a rigorous selection process, that's why the power and weapons afforded to them should be based on much higher standards.


.
06-23-2019 04:16 AM
GreenT
06-21-2019 08:17 AM
GreenT And I'm not sure how I feel about your response... I'm sure you're not ok with blatantly racist cops serving a community.
06-21-2019 05:35 AM
stockdill interesting but not sure how i feel about that...
06-21-2019 03:00 AM
GreenT
Quote:
(CNN)Law enforcement agencies in Dallas and Florida on Thursday became the latest to announce they are investigating allegations some of their employees made offensive comments on Facebook after a watchdog group compiled screenshots of the posts and shared them in an online database.

Since its founding in 2017, the Plain View Project says it has compiled images of more than 5,000 social media posts and comments by more than 3,500 current and former police officers in eight jurisdictions throughout the US.
Researchers obtained rosters of police officers and then looked them up on Facebook, according to the project's website.

After examining the profiles to confirm they belonged to police officers, they reviewed public posts and comments to see if they would "undermine public trust and confidence in police."

So far, two police departments, one sheriff's office and one circuit attorney's office have announced they are taking action:


https://www.cnn.com/2019/06/20/us/pl...ing/index.html
https://www.cnn.com/2019/06/19/us/ph...rnd/index.html


.
06-13-2019 11:01 AM
cowboyt ^^ My question: given the nature of the Secret Service's job, why weren't his fellow Secret Service agents filling these local Keystone assholes full of lead? Didn't said local Keystone assholes just increase the security threat to Sec'y Johnson by their actions? Last I checked, that was grounds for gettin' your ass shot *by* the Secret Service!
06-13-2019 10:37 AM
GreenT Nobody is safe...



Quote:
A former secret service agent's lawsuit claiming that two U.S. Park Police officers unlawfully detained him because he is black, causing him to miss a motorcade for a Cabinet secretary, can move forward, a federal judge ruled Monday.

Secret Service Agent Nathaniel Hicks was waiting in his Chevy Impala on a Maryland interstate at about 6 a.m. on July 11, 2015, to join then-Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson's motorcade when U.S. Park Police Officer Gerald L. Ferreyra approached.

Ferreyra "drew his gun, pointed the weapon at Special Agent Hicks, and began screaming at him," according to a lawsuit filed by Hicks in federal court in Maryland about a year later.

Hicks, who has since retired, was a 20-year Secret Service veteran at the time and was assigned as the Baltimore lead advance agent for Johnson's motorcade that day.

Hicks' Secret Service-issued car had a police antenna and a strobing bar, and he quickly told Ferreyra that he was a Secret Service agent, explaining that he was on duty and waiting to lead a motorcade, his lawsuit said.

Hicks handed over his credentials, which Ferreyra inspected while still pointing his gun at the agent. But after he confirmed Hicks was, in fact, a federal law enforcement officer, he didn't let him go and instead called for backup.

U.S. Park Police Officer Brian Phillips arrived and acknowledged that Hicks was a Secret Service agent. But the two men detained Hicks for over an hour, repeatedly telling him that he was not free to leave, Hicks' lawsuit said. During the detention, Ferreyra yelled at Hicks and "spoke to him in a degrading manner."

The motorcade passed about a half hour into the ordeal, slowing to allow Hicks to join, but he couldn't, the lawsuit said, adding that one of the officers on the scene "mockingly waved his hand goodbye at the motorcade as it passed."

When a supervisor arrived, he acknowledged that Hicks was a Secret Service agent and that he hadn't done anything criminal in nature, but didn't explain why Hicks had been held for so long.

Hicks was finally released, and unable to catch up with the motorcade, when he was pulled over again by Phillips, according to the lawsuit.

Phillips asked for Hicks' identification and car registration "despite just having had possession of these documents, and continued to talk to him in a demeaning and degrading tone with no possible justification," the lawsuit said.

When another officer spoke with Phillips, he decided to release Hicks "but not before throwing his identification and registration at him."

Phillips said he didn't recognize Hicks when he pulled him over after the initial detention, and did so because Hicks was on the phone and the car was swerving. Law enforcement officers can legally be on the phone while driving, and Hicks said he was not driving erratically.

Ferreyra said he had first approached Hicks' car and drew his weapon because there was a gun on Hicks' seat, according to court documents. Ferreyra maintains that he told Hicks he was free to go before the motorcade arrived.

Both officers argued that the lawsuit should be dismissed on the basis of qualified immunity, which protects police from civil damages as long as their actions are reasonably lawful and don't violate anyone's rights.

But U.S. District Judge Paul Grimm ruled that the officers have not proved why they couldn't let Hicks go before the motorcade arrived. Grimm wrote in his decision that the officers knew Hicks was a Secret Service agent at least 15 minutes before the motorcade passed, and could have easily determined through "a simple Google search" that he was authorized to have a weapon in his vehicle.

"It is clearly established that detaining a person under these circumstances — when the officers had a reasonable suspicion that criminal activity was underway but, after some investigation, became aware that no criminal activity was happening at the scene — is a violation of the individual's Fourth Amendment rights," Grimm wrote, while determining that parts of the suit should go to trial by jury.

Hicks said he "suffered, and continues to suffer, significant embarrassment, humiliation, emotional distress, and the deprivation of his constitutional rights."

"In addition to the manner in which defendants spoke to and treated him, it was particularly humiliating to be held on the side of the road as his colleagues passed by. That he was subjected to unlawful treatment because of his race compounds his emotional distress," Hicks' lawsuit said.

Hicks is suing for compensatory and punitive damages, to be decided by the jury.

Sgt. Eduardo Delgado with the U.S. Park Police said that he could not comment on pending litigation, but that both Ferreyra and Phillips were still employed with the department.

Attorneys for Hicks, Ferreyra and Phillips did not immediately respond to requests for comment regarding Grimm's decision.


https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news...ng-he-n1017126
06-08-2019 02:39 PM
Doni One never needs to apologize for anything when one refuses to accept the possibility they may be wrong.

It’s good to be the king....and Oceania has ALWAYS been at war with Eurasia.
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