Restoring a cracked steering wheel. - Page 2 - Mercedes-Benz Forum

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post #11 of 21 (permalink) Old 10-11-2014, 10:14 PM
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Originally Posted by wroding View Post
i used what is called glaze. A premixed filler that is used sparingly to perfect the shape.

John.
From a body shop presumably? What is it usually used for? I've fixed a few surfboards so I get the ideas, sort of.
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post #12 of 21 (permalink) Old 10-12-2014, 07:24 AM Thread Starter
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My buddy who works at a body shop suggested using it. It is premixed a little thinner and easier to use to fix small imperfections. Akong with the primer filler you can get real nice base to start painting.
John.
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post #13 of 21 (permalink) Old 10-12-2014, 09:47 AM
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Nice work it looks great, I like the look of the white steering wheels. I have also thought about buying one, but the nice ones are $$$ as you said, there are companies that restore them and sell DIY kits like you have done.

Mine is looks almost new so it seamed a bit said to change a perfectly good black one to white, maybe I will find a good deal on a white one.

Thanks for sharing.

.

1993 500E 040 / 271 - Porsche Type 2758 ~~~~ 1971 250C Ivory / Cognac Leather

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post #14 of 21 (permalink) Old 10-12-2014, 09:59 AM
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Wow. That is really a nice job!
I think the primer must have had a big unsung hero role to at as well -- finished so smoothly.

For archival purposes can you share with us all the materials you used?

Like which brand type of epoxy and glaze and primer? What grit did you use? Did you really sand every coat after every stage. Wet dry? 1500?

Your recipe is well worth documenting! Thank you!



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post #15 of 21 (permalink) Old 10-12-2014, 12:36 PM
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Here is one of the kits I was talking about with step by step instructions......

Steering Wheel Restoration - Steering Wheel Repair - Tips From Eastwood

.

1993 500E 040 / 271 - Porsche Type 2758 ~~~~ 1971 250C Ivory / Cognac Leather

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post #16 of 21 (permalink) Old 10-13-2014, 11:17 AM Thread Starter
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My Process.

Hi All
Some of you wanted me to write down my process. Here is a step by step description of the restoration and change of color of my steering wheel.

1. Remove and thoroughly sand entire wheel. I used 100 then 120 grit.
This will help with adhesion for the paint and also show up any very small cracks and crazing in the plastic.

2. Next I took a Dremel tool with a v cutter to open up the larger areas. This helps the filler adhere to the wheel. You can also drill very small holes into the sides of the gap to help the filler attach.

3. I mixed up JB weld. (The one pictured is the fast drying one.) I used the regular. This stage took a little time to get right. When dry I shaped the filler with a half round file and cabinet scraper (flat piece of steel with a bur on the edge used in woodworking) I used a triangular needle file to carve through the reeding detail on the perimeter of the wheel. Then sanded 100 grit then 120 to refine.

4. Next stage was to use the filler/glaze to further fine tune the shape of the repairs. This can be bought at any automotive store near the bondo. It comes premixed and is thinner, to help with smaller cracks and crazing in the plastic.
This sands very easily with 120 then 220 and makes a great base for the primer.

5. I used a urethane primer over the repairs to help me see. It gives a finer surface to sand and also gives you a chance to see what it will look like with paint. A Light scuff sand is sufficient.
The pads I use in the finishing process are micro fine rated at around 600 grit. Used dry.

6.Once the whole wheel is primed and sanded, I begun the painting. During the painting stage use a tack cloth and compressed area (if you have it) to dust of between coats. You can use a degreaser solvent also to make sure there are no contaminants oils etc present.
In the picture you can see I used a color called super white. Itís a nice soft/ivory color that nicely replicates the look of the originals. Of course you can use black if thatís what you want. I recommend thin even coats. I applied about 4 coats and sanded between coats using the micro pads. Only lightly scuffing the surface, Just to knock down any small imperfections.

7. Next up was to protect the paint with a clear coat. I used a semi gloss. Again a very light scuff sand between coats and 3 top coats were applied. Taking care with dust control so attain a nice smooth finish.

Overall it was not hard to accomplish and Iím happy with the look and finish.
I have been restoring and finishing antique furniture for 30 years and my best advice would be to do the best at each stage before moving onto the next. Preparation is of course important. But really, all stages are important to achieve the best results.
I would be glad to answer any questions if you have any problems.
All the best John
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post #17 of 21 (permalink) Old 10-13-2014, 11:31 AM
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Excellent work. Excellent documentation. Thank you!
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post #18 of 21 (permalink) Old 04-22-2015, 10:42 AM
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I love the work on that steering wheel. I've been searching the web on how to restore my white steering wheel since it has some cracks. I found some useful info and this post is just awesome very nice work. After thinking about it, I decided to try and polish it to get it to shine again before trying to paint it completely. I'm a little worried I end up ruinning my steering wheel if I paint it. I like the little spider webs but hate the cracks, fortunately these are small. If the polishing doesn't go as planned then ultimately I will paint it.

Below you can see mine, it's not prestine but it isn't destroyed either. Any tips on what to use to polish the white plastic? I heard it's made of bakelite...
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post #19 of 21 (permalink) Old 04-22-2015, 04:21 PM
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Way to go John, we're proud of you!
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post #20 of 21 (permalink) Old 04-22-2015, 07:44 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kaelor View Post
I love the work on that steering wheel. I've been searching the web on how to restore my white steering wheel since it has some cracks. I found some useful info and this post is just awesome very nice work. After thinking about it, I decided to try and polish it to get it to shine again before trying to paint it completely. I'm a little worried I end up ruinning my steering wheel if I paint it. I like the little spider webs but hate the cracks, fortunately these are small. If the polishing doesn't go as planned then ultimately I will paint it.

Below you can see mine, it's not prestine but it isn't destroyed either. Any tips on what to use to polish the white plastic? I heard it's made of bakelite...
I would use a polishing compound, such a mcguiers which is readily available at your local parts store. As im sure you know it comes in different grades ranging from aggresive to very fine. Try it in an area you don't see. It would be nice to keep the wheel original. All the fine cracks add character I think. Im vety happy with mine, its holding up well. Keep us posted.
Cheers John.
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