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post #41 of 88 (permalink) Old 05-15-2008, 07:48 PM
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Originally Posted by jedlacks View Post
We treated African Americans so bad in our history that we are worried about one getting elected??

C'mon people... we are electing a president that is more intelligent than Bush and we are bothered about the color of his skin? I drive a black benz so I must be racist.
Very true but the driving a black Mercedes does not qualify in the argument because some of us do drive black ones and for the most part have been certified as funny farm material
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post #42 of 88 (permalink) Old 05-15-2008, 08:04 PM
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Originally Posted by GermanStar View Post
I hate to say it, but I fear it might. Obama will carry all the blue states he's supposed to carry, but the further we stray from our nation's epicenters of sophistication, the more race will factor in. And remember, just about every candidate who has ever relied on a youth vote to carry him home has been disappointed. Younger voters may show more fervent support for their candidate before election day than their more seasoned counterparts, but it's the older voters who actually take the time out of their busy day to vote. Obama will need to choose his running mate very carefully...
Dead on....hence;

Clinton Wins in Landslide in West Virginia - US News and World Report
Clinton Wins in Landslide in West Virginia

Tuesday was a big day for Hillary Clinton as she won the Democratic presidential primary in West Virginia in a huge landslide.

But the outcome—in which Clinton swept nearly all demographic groups and won overall by a 2-to-1 margin—had much less impact on the overall race with Barack Obama than she and her strategists had hoped. Despite the margin, Clinton failed to gain much ground on her rival in delegates to the nominating convention this August in Denver.

As the final results were being tabulated, it appeared that Clinton would score a net gain of no more than a dozen delegates—with 20 going to Clinton and eight to Obama, under a system of proportional representation, with an additional 10 superdelegates to be determined separately. This left her substantially behind in the nomination race. Obama now has 1,883.5 delegates to Clinton's 1,717, according to the latest count by the Associated Press, with 2,025 needed for the nomination under current party rules.

But Geoff Garin, Clinton's chief strategist, said this morning that the West Virginia results should quiet calls for Clinton to drop out. He predicted that she will stay in the race at least until the final primaries conclude on June 3.

Tuesday night, Clinton praised Obama as a worthy contender and pledged to support him if he wins the nomination, but she promised to continue the fight. "The race isn't over yet," she told cheering supporters in Charleston, W.Va. She called herself "the strongest candidate" to defeat Republican John McCain in the general election.

Obama, recognizing that he would lose West Virginia, campaigned lightly there and devoted his time to other states. He told garment workers in Cape Girardeau County, Mo., Tuesday that it was time for a "new direction in Washington" as he turned his attention to the presumptive GOP nominee. "John McCain has decided that he is running for George Bush's third term in office," Obama said.

Clinton has only a few cards left to play in her effort to catch Obama. There are five contests left, with a total of 189 delegates—in Kentucky and Oregon next Tuesday; Puerto Rico June 1, and Montana and South Dakota June 3. She hopes to roll up big margins, especially in Kentucky and Puerto Rico, where she seems to be ahead. Obama, however, is strong in Oregon, Montana, and South Dakota.

Clinton's final move may be to challenge the Democratic National Committee's disqualification of all the delegates from Florida and Michigan, which held their primaries earlier than the DNC allowed. If all those delegates are counted—as Clinton wants, since she won the two disputed primaries—the magic number for a majority would be 2,209 delegates. This would give Clinton a last chance to overtake Obama if she won a big majority of the remaining superdelegates—party leaders whose votes aren't tied to caucuses and primaries. The DNC rules and bylaws committee will meet May 31 to consider the Florida and Michigan situation.

Garin said that even if the committee refuses to count all the disputed delegates, it will certainly count some of them, and that will increase the majority needed to attain the nomination, and keep Clinton's bid alive as she pursues superdelegates.
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post #43 of 88 (permalink) Old 05-15-2008, 08:06 PM
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And this...

The Associated Press: Kentucky demographics favor Clinton
Kentucky demographics favor Clinton
By ROGER ALFORD – 1 day ago

FRANKFORT, Ky. (AP) — Add a shot of whiskey and a pinch of tobacco and, politically, Kentucky is a lot like neighboring West Virginia — Clinton country.

Both states are overwhelmingly white, largely rural and have a greater share of residents below the poverty line and without college degrees than the nation as whole.
And, as she did in West Virginia, Hillary Rodham Clinton is expected to rack up a sizable victory in Kentucky's May 20 Democratic primary against front-runner Barack Obama, who is hoping to counter with a win on more favorable turf in Oregon the same day.

Clinton's track record gives her a strong advantage in Kentucky. Whites have favored Clinton over Obama by 55 percent to 40 percent, rural voters 51-43, and voters without college degrees 52-44 in exit polls from 26 competitive primaries.

Obama is strong among urban dwellers and rural blacks, giving him a fighting chance among voters in Louisville, the state's largest city, but little hope elsewhere, voting trends in other states indicate.

"Obama doesn't have much of a natural constituency in Kentucky," said Michael Baranowski, a political scientist at Northern Kentucky University. "Really, everything works in Clinton's favor."

One difference between the Rust Belt states that Clinton has won recently — Ohio, Pennsylvania and Indiana — and Kentucky is that the Bluegrass State has mostly benefited from trade with China.

Kentucky farmers grow tobacco for Chinese smokers. Distillery workers produce the world-famous bourbon whiskey, including Maker's Mark and Wild Turkey, that Chinese drinkers relish. In all, the state does more than $300 billion worth of business with China each year, according to the Kentucky World Trade Center in Lexington.

Clinton and Obama have appealed to blue-collar workers with promises to reopen trade agreements to include stronger labor and environmental protections. But Clinton has taken a harder line on China, suggesting that Bush should not attend opening ceremonies for this year's Olympic Games because of human rights abuses.

A record 2.8 million Kentuckians are registered to vote in the primary election. Of those, 1.6 million are Democrats. And, despite the close presidential primary, the number of new registered voters hasn't skyrocketed. In the past six months, 16,000 people have registered, 13,000 of them as Democrats.

Records from the Kentucky Board of Elections show that 53 percent of the state's registered voters are women, a demographic that has played in Clinton's favor in other states. Kentucky doesn't track party registrants by race, but blacks make up only 7.4 percent of the state's population compared with 12.4 percent nationally — a far smaller minority voting bloc than in other Southern states carried by Obama.

And Kentucky voters are slightly older than voters nationally, another advantage for Clinton.

Clinton has won the endorsement of three of Kentucky's Democratic superdelegates. Obama has been endorsed by two, both Democratic congressmen representing the state's two largest cities. Three other superdelegates remain undecided.

Both candidates have opened campaign offices across the state. Clinton has campaigned in Kentucky, as have her husband and daughter. Until this week when he held a huge rally in Louisville, Obama hadn't visited the state this year, but he's running ads in all Kentucky TV markets.

Political scientist Kendra Stewart at Eastern Kentucky University said Kentucky voters are interested largely in the same issues as their counterparts across the country — the economy, fuel prices, health care and Iraq. Kentuckians struggle with joblessness, especially in the impoverished mountain communities in the eastern half of the state. That population is also hit hardest by the price of gasoline, and more likely be without health care benefits.

Steve Earl, a union representative for the United Mine Workers of America, is convinced that the economy is the overriding issue, and that voters will make their decision based on who they think is best able to bring change.

"People are struggling across the state," he said.

Economic policy and energy policy are intertwined in Kentucky, where the coal mining industry employees 21,000, according to the National Mining Association.

Both Obama and Clinton have rallied environmentally-minded voters in other states with their promises to develop windmills, solar power and other renewable energy sources and order mandatory reductions in greenhouse gases from power plants to counter global warming.

It's a stance that would seem to target coal, which produces half the country's electricity but also nearly 2 billion tons of carbon dioxide, the leading greenhouse gas, each year.

Instead, "clean coal" — which environmentalists say is a contradiction — has become the mantra of both candidates.

On fuel prices, Clinton has advocated a summer gas tax holiday — an idea Obama opposes and one that has been widely panned by a range of influential economists.
With two large military installations — Fort Campbell and Fort Knox — Kentucky also has a big stake in the war in Iraq, but the issue may not be huge in the state's primary, Stewart said. Clinton and Obama have taken similar stands, each calling for withdrawing troops from Iraq.

Stewart said Clinton's support among churchgoers in other states bodes well for her in Kentucky. Clinton has done especially well among Catholic voters, which, Stewart said, could help her offset Obama's support among blacks in Louisville, one of the state's strongest Catholic communities.

One of the things that make Kentucky politics exciting, Stewart said, is its unpredictability.

"Kentucky's so unique since we don't have a solid identity," she said. "We aren't for sure a southern state, and we're not a midwestern state. So, at times, it can be difficult to make these generalizations."
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post #44 of 88 (permalink) Old 05-15-2008, 08:07 PM
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^ Right, and that will be John McCain's voting bloc, not Obama's...

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post #45 of 88 (permalink) Old 05-15-2008, 08:23 PM
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And this...

The Associated Press: Kentucky demographics favor Clinton
Kentucky demographics favor Clinton
By ROGER ALFORD – 1 day ago

FRANKFORT, Ky. (AP) — Add a shot of whiskey and a pinch of tobacco and, politically, Kentucky is a lot like neighboring West Virginia — Clinton country.

Both states are overwhelmingly white, largely rural and have a greater share of residents below the poverty line and without college degrees than the nation as whole.
And, as she did in West Virginia, Hillary Rodham Clinton is expected to rack up a sizable victory in Kentucky's May 20 Democratic primary against front-runner Barack Obama, who is hoping to counter with a win on more favorable turf in Oregon the same day.

Clinton's track record gives her a strong advantage in Kentucky. Whites have favored Clinton over Obama by 55 percent to 40 percent, rural voters 51-43, and voters without college degrees 52-44 in exit polls from 26 competitive primaries.

Obama is strong among urban dwellers and rural blacks, giving him a fighting chance among voters in Louisville, the state's largest city, but little hope elsewhere, voting trends in other states indicate.

"Obama doesn't have much of a natural constituency in Kentucky," said Michael Baranowski, a political scientist at Northern Kentucky University. "Really, everything works in Clinton's favor."

One difference between the Rust Belt states that Clinton has won recently — Ohio, Pennsylvania and Indiana — and Kentucky is that the Bluegrass State has mostly benefited from trade with China.

Kentucky farmers grow tobacco for Chinese smokers. Distillery workers produce the world-famous bourbon whiskey, including Maker's Mark and Wild Turkey, that Chinese drinkers relish. In all, the state does more than $300 billion worth of business with China each year, according to the Kentucky World Trade Center in Lexington.

Clinton and Obama have appealed to blue-collar workers with promises to reopen trade agreements to include stronger labor and environmental protections. But Clinton has taken a harder line on China, suggesting that Bush should not attend opening ceremonies for this year's Olympic Games because of human rights abuses.

A record 2.8 million Kentuckians are registered to vote in the primary election. Of those, 1.6 million are Democrats. And, despite the close presidential primary, the number of new registered voters hasn't skyrocketed. In the past six months, 16,000 people have registered, 13,000 of them as Democrats.

Records from the Kentucky Board of Elections show that 53 percent of the state's registered voters are women, a demographic that has played in Clinton's favor in other states. Kentucky doesn't track party registrants by race, but blacks make up only 7.4 percent of the state's population compared with 12.4 percent nationally — a far smaller minority voting bloc than in other Southern states carried by Obama.

And Kentucky voters are slightly older than voters nationally, another advantage for Clinton.

Clinton has won the endorsement of three of Kentucky's Democratic superdelegates. Obama has been endorsed by two, both Democratic congressmen representing the state's two largest cities. Three other superdelegates remain undecided.

Both candidates have opened campaign offices across the state. Clinton has campaigned in Kentucky, as have her husband and daughter. Until this week when he held a huge rally in Louisville, Obama hadn't visited the state this year, but he's running ads in all Kentucky TV markets.

Political scientist Kendra Stewart at Eastern Kentucky University said Kentucky voters are interested largely in the same issues as their counterparts across the country — the economy, fuel prices, health care and Iraq. Kentuckians struggle with joblessness, especially in the impoverished mountain communities in the eastern half of the state. That population is also hit hardest by the price of gasoline, and more likely be without health care benefits.

Steve Earl, a union representative for the United Mine Workers of America, is convinced that the economy is the overriding issue, and that voters will make their decision based on who they think is best able to bring change.

"People are struggling across the state," he said.

Economic policy and energy policy are intertwined in Kentucky, where the coal mining industry employees 21,000, according to the National Mining Association.

Both Obama and Clinton have rallied environmentally-minded voters in other states with their promises to develop windmills, solar power and other renewable energy sources and order mandatory reductions in greenhouse gases from power plants to counter global warming.

It's a stance that would seem to target coal, which produces half the country's electricity but also nearly 2 billion tons of carbon dioxide, the leading greenhouse gas, each year.

Instead, "clean coal" — which environmentalists say is a contradiction — has become the mantra of both candidates.

On fuel prices, Clinton has advocated a summer gas tax holiday — an idea Obama opposes and one that has been widely panned by a range of influential economists.
With two large military installations — Fort Campbell and Fort Knox — Kentucky also has a big stake in the war in Iraq, but the issue may not be huge in the state's primary, Stewart said. Clinton and Obama have taken similar stands, each calling for withdrawing troops from Iraq.

Stewart said Clinton's support among churchgoers in other states bodes well for her in Kentucky. Clinton has done especially well among Catholic voters, which, Stewart said, could help her offset Obama's support among blacks in Louisville, one of the state's strongest Catholic communities.

One of the things that make Kentucky politics exciting, Stewart said, is its unpredictability.

"Kentucky's so unique since we don't have a solid identity," she said. "We aren't for sure a southern state, and we're not a midwestern state. So, at times, it can be difficult to make these generalizations."
Besides the two superdelegates that came out for Obama, the Lt Governor also endorsed Obama and the Governor looks to be heading that way but don't know if he will endorse anyone before Tuesday.

On a VERY unscientific driving through the neighborhoods and through Lexington poll, I can say that I have seen FOUR Clinton yard signs [I borrowed one for my next trip to Lawrence, Kansas] and 46 Obama yard signs. They are ALL in very white neighborhoods. Lexington has about a 14% AA/Latino population. I have seen ONE McCain yard sign.

On cars I have seen a bunch of Obama stickers and the only Clinton stickers I have seen are on the cars of two of my lesbian friends.

I would imagine that most of the Rural tobacco growing counties will vote for Clinton. It will be interesting to see. The Court Clerk, besides harassing me about sending in Probate forms on time has announced that there are a record number of new voters registered.

McBear,
Kentucky

Being smart is knowing the difference, in a sticky situation between a well delivered anecdote and a well delivered antidote - bear.
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post #46 of 88 (permalink) Old 05-15-2008, 08:27 PM Thread Starter
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I didn't read his book but I am willing to bet that you took every word of his out off context.
You are willing to bet that cause you are retarded. Read the book asshole. This is a man that has condemned his white roots, he is pro black and he hates you and this country white boy. Now go vote for him like a good little wigga.
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post #47 of 88 (permalink) Old 05-15-2008, 08:30 PM
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^ Right, and that will be John McCain's constituency, not Obama's...
But not necessarily. So many of those same folks, come the general election go to the booth and, if they are a registered Democrat, they hit the Democrat lever at the top of the machine [or the electronic version] much like their dad and granddad did. Same with the Republicans. They might not like Obama but, as a life long Democrat, most are sure not going to vote for a Republican.

Second most likely outcome would be to not vote. So it does not simply go from either Obama or McCain. The decision flow is Obama or Nobody or McCain.

And all of this is predicated on no third/fourth party spoilers wandering in to piss in the Cheerios.

McBear,
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Being smart is knowing the difference, in a sticky situation between a well delivered anecdote and a well delivered antidote - bear.
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post #48 of 88 (permalink) Old 05-15-2008, 08:32 PM Thread Starter
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You need to really attempt to get a grasp on reading comprehension. If you glean racism from his book [which I would bet you have not read] you are going in with filters on.

Read the entire book, in context before drawing conclusions. Also, while not possible you have to understand it was not written from the perspective of a Southern white guy.
I have read his book and I can tell you that if it was a white person that wrote it and every white reference was substituted for black, there would be no way in fucking hell that white guy would have gotten this far. As for being a southern white guy, not quite. I'm a European American raised in NY for most my life.
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post #49 of 88 (permalink) Old 05-15-2008, 08:35 PM
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But not necessarily. So many of those same folks, come the general election go to the booth and, if they are a registered Democrat, they hit the Democrat lever at the top of the machine [or the electronic version] much like their dad and granddad did. Same with the Republicans. They might not like Obama but, as a life long Democrat, most are sure not going to vote for a Republican.

Second most likely outcome would be to not vote. So it does not simply go from either Obama or McCain. The decision flow is Obama or Nobody or McCain.

And all of this is predicated on no third/fourth party spoilers wandering in to piss in the Cheerios.
Betcha a quarter WV goes McCain.

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post #50 of 88 (permalink) Old 05-15-2008, 08:36 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by jedlacks View Post
C'mon people... we are electing a president that is more intelligent than Bush and we are bothered about the color of his skin?
Electing a President smarter than Bush?. Which candidate on either side wasn't smarter than Bush?. If Bush is your fucking benchmark on intelligence you've got mad problems man.
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