How to make out like a bandit on the low US Dollar - Page 2 - Mercedes-Benz Forum

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post #11 of 26 (permalink) Old 11-24-2007, 03:29 PM
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Samething happened here on a more erratic scale in 97/98 the Indonesian Rupiah went from 3000 to 1 dollar up to a max of 17000 to 1 dollar and then just fluctuated between 10000 to 16000 per dollar until settling out. Was buying IDR at 15000 to 16000 and buying back USD when the IDR would strengthen to 12 to 13000 a month later. This cycle went on for a while and also bought a couple of cars here and resold them for a 200% profit a few months later.
You can in large part thank the U.S. and the World Bank for the financial crisis that erupted in E. Asia (and to a lesser degree in S. America) during 1997. That is a fine example of the negative consequences of foreign interference and an unstable financial market. The wild fluctuations of ebb and flow are a far cry from the ideal of stability, and stability is the sign of strength we should all strive for.

"If spending money you don't have is the height of stupidity, borrowing money to give it away is the height of insanity." -- anon
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post #12 of 26 (permalink) Old 11-24-2007, 03:39 PM
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You can in large part thank the U.S. and the World Bank for the financial crisis that erupted in E. Asia (and to a lesser degree in S. America) during 1997. That is a fine example of the negative consequences of foreign interference and an unstable financial market. The wild fluctuations of ebb and flow are a far cry from the ideal of stability, and stability is the sign of strength we should all strive for.
And who should we thank for the monetary, credit, and overall crisis in the US of A that is here but not yet finished? Some will cry Bush, others will cry the FED, others will cry the assholes that came up with easy credit schemes that are failing now, others will cry the American people themselves for being so greedy and others will cry others that I obviously cannot think of right now but we know they are too blame........
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post #13 of 26 (permalink) Old 11-24-2007, 04:13 PM
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During this time, however, I get to hear from those who think America is crap because we outsourced everything, our dollar sucks, and no body loves us. Well, I don't think America is in the shitter - our economy is booming, unemployment is very low, GDP is rising, and our standard of living is the highest in the world. I happen to like this country, and although a dose of criticism doesn't bother me, the loud, uninformed parrots do.

I trust that age will not wither, nor custom stale your infinite variety of the truth.
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post #14 of 26 (permalink) Old 11-24-2007, 04:27 PM
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^True
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post #15 of 26 (permalink) Old 11-25-2007, 03:06 AM
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During this time, however, I get to hear from those who think America is crap because we outsourced everything, our dollar sucks, and no body loves us. Well, I don't think America is in the shitter - our economy is booming, unemployment is very low, GDP is rising, and our standard of living is the highest in the world. I happen to like this country, and although a dose of criticism doesn't bother me, the loud, uninformed parrots do.
I trust that age will not wither, nor custom stale your infinite variety of the truth.
Von, when did you get the Big Eagle passport?
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post #16 of 26 (permalink) Old 12-03-2007, 12:24 AM
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post #17 of 26 (permalink) Old 12-03-2007, 01:19 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Von Vorschlag View Post
During this time, however, I get to hear from those who think America is crap because we outsourced everything, our dollar sucks, and no body loves us. Well, I don't think America is in the shitter - our economy is booming, unemployment is very low, GDP is rising, and our standard of living is the highest in the world. I happen to like this country, and although a dose of criticism doesn't bother me, the loud, uninformed parrots do.

I trust that age will not wither, nor custom stale your infinite variety of the truth.
Standard of living in the United States
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Median gross annual household and personal income in 2005.[1][2][3]
Median household income and GDP per capita levels in selected developed nations.The standard of living in the United States is one of the top 15 in the world by the standard economist measure of standard of living. Per capita income is high but also less evenly distributed than in most other developed countries; as a result, the United States fares particularly well in measures of average material well being that do not place weight on equality aspects.

On comprehensive measures such as the UN Human Development Index the United States is always in the top ten, currently ranking number eight. Scandinavian countries, Ireland, Belgium, Canada, Australia, and (until recently) Japan; Canada and Norway have alternately held the top spot for some time. On the Human Poverty Index the United States ranked 16th, one rank below the United Kingdom and one rank above Ireland.[4] On the Economist's quality-of-life index the United States ranked 13, in between Finland and Canada, scoring 7.6 out of a possible 10. The highest given score of 8.3 was applied to Ireland. This particular index takes into account a variety of socio-economic variables ranging from GDP per capita and life expectancy to political stability and unemployment.[5]

The homeownership rate is relatively high compared to other post-industrial nations. In 2005, 69% of Americans resided in their own homes, roughly the same percentage as in the United Kingdom, Belgium, Israel and Canada.[6] [7] [8] Residents of the United States also enjoy a high access to consumer goods. Americans enjoy more radios per capita than any other nation [9] and more televisions and personal computers per capita than any other large nation.[10] [11]

The median income is $43,318 per household ($26,000 per household member)[1] with 42% of households having two income earners.[12] Meanwhile, the median income of the average American age 25+ was roughly $32,000[2] ($39,000 if only counting those employed full-time between the ages of 25 to 64) in 2005.[3] According to the CIA the gini index which measures income inequality (the higher the less equal the income distribution) was clocked at 45.0 in 2005,[13] compared to 32.0 in the European Union[14] and 28.3 in Germany.[15]

“ The US has... a per capita GDP [PPP] of $42,000... The [recent] onrush of technology largely explains the gradual development of a "two-tier labor market"... Since 1975, practically all the gains in household income have gone to the top 20% of households... The rise in GDP in 2004 and 2005 was undergirded by substantial gains in labor productivity... Long-term problems include inadequate investment in economic infrastructure, rapidly rising medical and pension costs of an aging population, sizable trade and budget deficits, and stagnation of family income in the lower economic groups. -CIA factbook on the US economy, 2005.[13]


The United States has one of the widest rich-poor gap of any high-income nation today, and that gap continues to grow.[16] In recent times, some prominent economists including Alan Greenspan have warned that the widening rich-poor gap in the U.S. population is a problem that could undermine and destabilize the country's economy and standard of living.[
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post #18 of 26 (permalink) Old 12-03-2007, 02:24 AM
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More on that other respected measure of national well-being, the HDI, Human Development Index. The US is not in the top ten.

The HDI measures the average achievements in a country in three basic dimensions of human development:

* A long and healthy life, as measured by life expectancy at birth.

* Knowledge and Education, as measured by the adult literacy rate (with two-thirds weighting) and the combined primary, secondary, and tertiary gross enrollment ratio (with one-third weighting).

* A decent standard of living, as measured by the log of gross domestic product (GDP) per capita at purchasing power parity (PPP)

You will see the usual suspects at the top of this list. (The second list shows past leaders)

Top thirty countries in 2007 (HDI range from 0.968 down to 0.894)

1. - Iceland 0.968
2. - Norway 0.968
3. - Australia 0.962
4. - Canada 0.961
5. - Ireland 0.959
6. - Sweden 0.956
7. - Switzerland 0.955
8. - Japan 0.953
9. - Netherlands 0.953
10. - France 0.952

11. - Finland 0.952
12. - United States 0.951
13. - Spain 0.949
14. - Denmark 0.949
15. - Austria 0.948
16. - United Kingdom 0.946
17. - Belgium 0.946
18. - Luxembourg 0.944
19. - New Zealand 0.943
20. - Italy 0.941

21. - Hong Kong 0.937
22. - Germany 0.935
23. - Israel 0.932
24. - Greece 0.926
25. - Singapore 0.922
26. - South Korea 0.921
27. - Slovenia 0.917
28. - Portugal 0.904
29. - Cyprus 0.903
30. - Brunei 0.894


Following: The number one ranked country in each year of the index. Canada has been the highest ranked country ten times, followed by Norway, which stayed at the top six times. Japan has been ranked highest twice and Switzerland and Iceland once.

* 2007 – Iceland
* 2006 – Norway
* 2005 – Norway
* 2004 – Norway
* 2003 – Norway
* 2002 – Norway
* 2001 – Norway
* 2000 – Canada
* 1999 – Canada
* 1998 – Canada
* 1997 – Canada
* 1996 – Canada
* 1995 – Canada
* 1994 – Canada
* 1993 – Japan
* 1992 – Canada
* 1991 – Japan
* 1990 – Canada
* 1985 – Canada
* 1980 – Switzerland

Human Development Index - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Last edited by Marsden; 12-03-2007 at 02:29 AM.
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post #19 of 26 (permalink) Old 12-03-2007, 02:25 AM
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Oh, and if anyone has good ideas about how to make out like a bandit on the low US Dollar, please let me know.
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post #20 of 26 (permalink) Old 12-03-2007, 05:47 AM
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Could one of you financial guys explain to me how this is- The Chinese RMB is revalued upward and yet everytime this happens Sterling is worth more to the RMB. ie before revaluation pound sterling is 100 pounds to 1256 RMB and after revaluation 100 is 1356 (these figures are just an example). Does this mean revaluation actually makes the RMB weaker to the pound?
PS You can see im not a financial wiz kid

ERIC.

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